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Aging in rural Canada: a retrospective and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132883
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Norah Keating
Jennifer Swindle
Stephanie Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta. Norah.keating@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Family
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Research
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Social Participation
Social Support
Work
Abstract
Research on rural aging has developed considerably since publication of the book Aging in Rural Canada (Butterworths, 1991). The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a retrospective on issues in rural aging from this book, and to review Canadian literature on rural aging since its publication. The review highlights new directions in conceptual definitions of rural, and in issues of social engagement, independence, family and social networks, and rural services and health. Two main research lenses are evident. The marginalization lens focuses on rural seniors with health problems, but has not included those marginalized by poverty or gender. The aging-well lens focuses on contributions and engagement, but has omitted research on social relationships and quality of family interaction. The report includes a call for interrogation about interaction between people and place, and for understanding issues of rural diversity and processes of rural aging.
PubMed ID
21767464 View in PubMed
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Association between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations after stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285730
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Sep;24(5):339-348
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Aileen Bergström
Susanne Guidetti
Kerstin Tham
Gunilla Eriksson
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Sep;24(5):339-348
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Occupational therapy
Personal Satisfaction
Social Participation
Stroke rehabilitation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Within occupational therapy, it is assumed that individuals are satisfied when participating in everyday occupations that they want to do. However, there is little empirical evidence to show this.
The aim of this study is to explore and describe the relation between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations in a Swedish cohort, 5 years post stroke.
Sixty-nine persons responded to the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). The questionnaire measures subjective restrictions in participation, i.e. the discrepancy between doing and wanting to do 30 different occupations in everyday life, and satisfaction per activity. Results were analysed with McNemar/chi-square.
Seventy percent of the persons perceived participation restrictions. Individuals that did not perceive restrictions in their participation had a significantly higher level of satisfaction (p?=?.002) compared to those that had restrictions. Participants that performed activities that they wanted to do report between 79 and 100% satisfaction per activity.
In this cohort, there was a significant association between satisfaction and participating in everyday occupations one wants to do, showing that satisfaction is an important aspect of participation and substantiates a basic assumption within occupational therapy. The complexity of measuring satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations is discussed.
PubMed ID
27774829 View in PubMed
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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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Cites: Aging Ment Health. 2007 Mar;11(2):119-3017453545
PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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Being in a Bubble: the experience of loneliness among frail older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277468
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2016 Mar;72(3):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Elin Taube
Ulf Jakobsson
Patrik Midlöv
Jimmie Kristensson
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2016 Mar;72(3):631-40
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Social Isolation - psychology
Social Participation - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the experience of loneliness among frail older people living at home.
Loneliness is a threat to the physical and psychological well-being with serious consequences if left unattended. There are associations between frailty and poor psychological well-being, implying that frail older people who experience loneliness are vulnerable.
Qualitative content analysis, focusing on both latent and manifest content.
Frail older people (65+ years), living at home and who have experienced various levels in intensity of loneliness, were purposively selected from a larger interventional study (N = 12). For this study, 'frail' means being dependent in activities of daily life and having repeated contacts with healthcare services. Data were collected between December 2009-August 2011. Semi-structured interviews were performed, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim.
The analysis resulted in the overall theme 'Being in a Bubble', which illustrates an experience of living in an ongoing world, but excluded because of the participants' social surroundings and the impossibility to regain losses. The theme 'Barriers' was interpreted as facing physical, psychological and social barriers for overcoming loneliness. The theme 'Hopelessness' reveals the experience when not succeeding in overcoming these barriers, including seeing loneliness as a constant state. A positive co-existing dimension of loneliness, offering independence, was reflected in the theme 'Freedom'.
The findings suggest that future strategies for intervening should target the frail older persons' individual barriers and promoting the positive co-existing dimension of loneliness. When caring, a person centred approach, encompassing knowledge regarding physical and psychological aspects, including loneliness, is recommended.
PubMed ID
26568280 View in PubMed
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Being part of an enacted togetherness: narratives of elderly people with depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121099
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):410-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anneli Nyman
Staffan Josephsson
Gunilla Isaksson
Author Affiliation
Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. anneli.nyman@ltu.se
Source
J Aging Stud. 2012 Dec;26(4):410-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Friends - psychology
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Narration
Residence Characteristics
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Social Identification
Social Participation - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Widowhood - psychology
Abstract
In this article, we explored how five elderly persons with depression engaged in everyday activities with others, over time, and how this was related to their experience of meaning. Repeated interviews and participant observations generated data that was analysed using a narrative approach. Analysis identified togetherness as an acted relation, "enacted togetherness", emphasising how the act of doing everyday activities with someone created togetherness and belonging, and being part of an enacted togetherness seemed to be a way for the participants to negotiate and construct meaning. Opportunities for doing things together with someone were closely associated to the place where the participants lived. Furthermore, engagement in activities together with others created hope and expectations of future acting. Findings from this research can extend our understanding of how participating in everyday activities is experienced as a social process including change over time, presenting the perspective of elderly people themselves. In light of these findings, we highlight the need to consider how opportunities to become part of an enacted togetherness can be created. Also, we aspire to contribute to the debate on how to understand the complexity related to social aspects of ageing and add to the emerging understanding of everyday activities as transactional, incorporating people and the environment in a dynamic process that goes beyond the individual.
PubMed ID
22939537 View in PubMed
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Changes from 1986 to 2006 in reasons for liking leisure-time physical activity among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281776
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Aug;26(8):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
B. Wold
H. Littlecott
J. Tynjälä
O. Samdal
L. Moore
C. Roberts
L. Kannas
J. Villberg
L E Aarø
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Aug;26(8):951-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Motivation
Norway
Social Participation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wales
Abstract
Reasons for participating in physical activity (PA) may have changed in accordance with the general modernization of society. The aim is to examine changes in self-reported reasons for liking leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and their association with self-reported LTPA over a 20-year period. Data were collected among nationally representative samples of 13-year-olds in Finland, Norway, and Wales in 1986 and 2006 (N?=?9252) as part of the WHO cross-national Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Univariate ANOVAs to establish differences according to gender, year, and country were conducted. In all countries, 13-year-olds in 2006 tended to report higher importance in terms of achievement and social reasons than their counterparts in 1986, while changes in health reasons were minor. These reasons were associated with LTPA in a similar way at both time points. Health reasons for liking LTPA were considered most important, and were the strongest predictor of LTPA. The findings seem robust as they were consistent across countries and genders. Health education constitutes the most viable strategy for promoting adolescents' motivation for PA, and interventions and educational efforts could be improved by an increased focus on LTPA and sport as a social activity.
PubMed ID
26220306 View in PubMed
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Changes in access to structural social capital and its influence on self-rated health over time for middle-aged men and women: a longitudinal study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268751
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Apr;130:250-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Malin Eriksson
Nawi Ng
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Apr;130:250-8
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aging
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sex Factors
Social capital
Social Participation
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Until recently, most studies on social capital and health have been cross-sectional making it difficult to draw causal conclusions. This longitudinal study used data from 33,621 individuals (15,822 men and 17,799 women) from the Västerbotten Intervention Program, to analyse how changes in access to individual social capital influence self-rated health (SRH) over time. Two forms of structural social capital, i.e. informal socializing and social participation, were measured. Age, sex, education, marital status, smoking, snuff, physical activity, alcohol consumption, high blood pressure, and body mass index were analysed as potential confounders. The association between changes in access to structural social capital and SRH in the follow-up was adjusted for SRH at baseline, as well as for changes in the socio-demographic and health-risk variables over time. The results support that changes in access to structural social capital over time impact on SRH. Remaining with no/low level of informal socializing over time increased the odds ratio for poor SRH for both men and women (OR of 1.45; 95%CI = 1.22-1.73 among men and OR of 1.56; 95%CI = 1.33-1.84 among women). Remaining with no/low levels of social participation was also detrimental to SRH in men and women (OR 1.14; 95%CI = 1.03-1.26 among men and OR 1.18; 95%CI = 1.08-1.29 among women). A decrease in informal socializing over time was associated with poor SRH for women and men (OR of 1.35; 95%CI = 1.16-1.58 among men and OR of 1.57; 95%CI = 1.36-1.82 among women). A loss of social participation had a negative effect on SRH among men and women (OR of 1.16; 95%CI = 1.03-1.30 among men and OR of 1.15; 95%CI = 1.04-1.27 among women). Gaining access to social participation was harmful for SRH for women (OR 1.17; 95%CI = 1.05-1.31). Structural social capital has complex and gendered effects on SRH and interventions aiming to use social capital for health promotion purposes require an awareness of its gendered nature.
PubMed ID
25734610 View in PubMed
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Community integration outcomes after traumatic brain injury due to physical assault.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115028
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2013 Feb;80(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Hwan Kim
Angela Colantonio
Deirdre R Dawson
Mark T Bayley
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Daegu University, Jullyang, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea.
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2013 Feb;80(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Injuries - etiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Canada
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Recreation - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Self Concept
Social Participation - psychology
Statistics, nonparametric
Travel - psychology
Violence
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Community integration is considered an ultimate goal for rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury (TBI).
To determine (a) whether differences exist in rehabilitation outcomes between intentional and unintentional TBI populations and (b) whether TBI from assault is a predictor of community integration following inpatient rehabilitation.
Retrospective cohort study using population-based data from Canadian hospital administration records, 2001 to 2006. Outcome measure was the Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNLI).
From a sample of 243 persons, 24 (9.9%) had sustained TBI from physical assault. Persons with TBI from physical assault reported significantly lower scores on two items on the RNLI's Daily Functioning subscale: "recreation" and "family role."
These findings suggest that targeted intervention in these specific areas could be beneficial, which are often primarily addressed by occupational therapists in both inpatient rehabilitation and community settings.
PubMed ID
23550497 View in PubMed
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Community participation, supports, and barriers of school-age children with and without disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120044
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Feb;94(2):315-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Gary Bedell
Wendy Coster
Mary Law
Kendra Liljenquist
Ying-Chia Kao
Rachel Teplicky
Dana Anaby
Mary Alunkal Khetani
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA. gary.bedell@tufts.edu
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Feb;94(2):315-23
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Children
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Participation
Social Support
United States
Abstract
To examine patterns of community participation and environmental factors that affect community participation for school-age children with and without disabilities.
Cross-sectional, descriptive, and exploratory study.
Parents from the United States and Canada completed the main outcome measure online in their homes or communities.
Parents (N=576) reported on their children aged 5 to 17 years with disabilities (n=282) and without disabilities (n=294).
Not applicable.
Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth.
Group differences in summary scores and many items were significant (P
PubMed ID
23044364 View in PubMed
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A comparative ICF-CY-based analysis and cultural piloting of the assessment of preschool children's participation (APCP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265799
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2015 Feb;35(1):54-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Kløve Nina
Østensjø Sigrid
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2015 Feb;35(1):54-72
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Child
Child, Preschool
Cultural Characteristics
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Infant
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Male
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Social Participation
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess and compare the content and measurement construct of a new measure, the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP), with other participation measures that have previously been linked to the ICF-CY, and pilot the APCP item relevance in a Norwegian context.
All meaningful concepts in the APCP were linked to the ICF-CY and compared with the links of eight other preschool measures. The analysis of measurement construct was based on the attending/doing and involvement/engagement dimensions of participation. The pilot study was a survey among 36 parents of typically developing children.
Like most measures, the APCP has a relatively high content intensity on recreation and play, but differs by excluding self-care activities and including some learning activities. All instruments use objective indicators to measure participation. The APCP was not among the few that assessed subjective aspects of participation. The APCP items were found highly relevant in a Norwegian context, with the exception of a few organized activities taking place outside home environments.
Differences in content and measurement constructs and the cultural equivalence should be considered when selecting a participation instrument for use among preschool children.
PubMed ID
25231756 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.