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The 2005 British Columbia smoking cessation mass media campaign and short-term changes in smokers attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158616
Source
J Health Commun. 2008 Mar;13(2):125-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2008 Mar;13(2):125-48
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Female
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Program Development
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Risk-Taking
Smoking
Smoking Cessation - methods
Social Marketing
Time Factors
Abstract
The effect of the 2005 British Columbia (BC) smoking cessation mass media campaign on a panel (N = 1,341) of 20-30-year-old smokers' attitudes is evaluated. The 5-week campaign consisted of posters, television, and radio ads about the health benefits of cessation. Small impacts on the panel's attitudes toward the adverse impacts of smoking were found, with greater impacts found for those who had no plans to quit smoking at the initial interview. As smokers with no plans to quit increasingly recognized the adverse impacts of smoking, they also increasingly agreed that they use smoking as a coping mechanism. Smokers with plans to quit at the initial interview already were well aware of smoking's adverse impacts. Respondents recalling the campaign poster, which presented a healthy alternative to smoking, decreased their perception of smoking as a coping mechanism and devalued their attachment to smoking. Evidence was found that media ad recall mediates unobserved predictors of attitudes toward smoking.
PubMed ID
18300065 View in PubMed
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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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Action schools! BC--Healthy Eating: effects of a whole-school model to modifying eating behaviours of elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155339
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Meghan E Day
Karen S Strange
Heather A McKay
Patti-Jean Naylor
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):328-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Feasibility Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Focus Groups
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The rate of obesity and associated risk factors in Canadian youth is increasing at an alarming rate. Nutrition plays an important role in weight maintenance. This study reports the effectiveness of Action Schools! BC---Healthy Eating, a school-based fruit and vegetable (FV) intervention, in effecting change in: 1) students' intake of FV, 2) students' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding FV, and 3) students' willingness to try new FV.
Five schools that represented geographic, socio-economic and size variation were recruited as Action Schools! BC--Healthy Eating intervention schools. A second set of five schools were selected as matched healthy eating usual practice schools. Student outcomes were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up using self-report questionnaires. Classroom logs and progress reports were used to assess implementation dose and fidelity. The intervention included school-wide activities based on individualized Action Plans addressing goals across six Action Zones.
Significant differences were found between conditions over time while controlling for baseline levels. Fruit servings, FV servings, FV variety, and percent of FV tried from a fixed list increased in intervention schools. Teachers implemented a mean of 64% of requested classroom dose, and school Action Teams implemented activities across 80% of the whole-school model.
A whole-school framework can impact FV intake, but results were modest due to implementation issues. Further implementation and evaluation are necessary to fully understand the effectiveness of this initiative.
PubMed ID
18767281 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the Healthy Heart Kit by Alberta family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147884
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Raphaël Bize
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Shannon D Scott
Nandini Karunamuni
Wendy Rodgers
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Abstract
The Healthy Heart Kit (HHK) is a risk management and patient education kit for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the promotion of CV health. There are currently no published data examining predictors of HHK use by physicians. The main objective of this study was to examine the association between physicians' characteristics (socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural) and the use of the HHK.
All registered family physicians in Alberta (n=3068) were invited to participate in the "Healthy Heart Kit" Study. Consenting physicians (n=153) received the Kit and were requested to use it for two months. At the end of this period, a questionnaire collected data on the frequency of Kit use by physicians, as well as socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural variables pertaining to the physicians.
The questionnaire was returned by 115 physicians (follow-up rate = 75%). On a scale ranging from 0 to 100, the mean score of Kit use was 61 [SD=26]. A multiple linear regression showed that "agreement with the Kit" and the degree of "confidence in using the Kit" was strongly associated with Kit use, explaining 46% of the variability for Kit use. Time since graduation was inversely associated with Kit use, and a trend was observed for smaller practices to be associated with lower use.
Given these findings, future research and practice should explore innovative strategies to gain initial agreement among physicians to employ such clinical tools. Participation of older physicians and solo-practitioners in this process should be emphasized.
PubMed ID
19839292 View in PubMed
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Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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Advertising strategies to increase public knowledge of the warning signs of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184513
Source
Stroke. 2003 Aug;34(8):1965-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Frank L Silver
Frank Rubini
Diane Black
Corinne S Hodgson
Author Affiliation
Stroke Investigation Unit, University Health Network, Toronto Western Division, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Stroke. 2003 Aug;34(8):1965-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - methods
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Data Collection
Educational Status
Female
Great Britain
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Program Evaluation - statistics & numerical data
Public Opinion
Sex Factors
Social Marketing
Stroke - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
Public awareness of the warning signs of stroke is important. As part of an educational campaign using mass media, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario conducted public opinion polling in 4 communities to track the level of awareness of the warning signs of stroke and to determine the impact of different media strategies.
Telephone surveys were conducted among members of the general public in 1 control and 3 test communities before and after mass media campaigns. The main outcome measure used to determine effectiveness of the campaigns was the ability to name > or =2 warning signs of stroke.
In communities exposed to television advertising, ability to name the warning signs of stroke increased significantly. There was no significant change in the community receiving print (newspaper) advertising, and the control community experienced a decrease. Television increased the knowledge of both men and women and of people with less than a secondary school education but not of those > or =65 years of age. Intermittent, low-level television advertising was as effective as continuous, high-level television advertising.
Results of this survey can be used to guide mass media-buying strategies for public health education.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2003 Aug;34(8):1968-912869722
PubMed ID
12855823 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study: cancer risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127401
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Anne P Lanier
Diana G Redwood
Janet J Kelly
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Diet
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Self Administration
Social Marketing
Young Adult
Abstract
The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study assessed cancer risk among 3,821 Alaska Native people (AN). We present the prevalence of selected cancer risk factors and comparison with Healthy People 2010 goals. Participants completed extensive computer-assisted self-administered questionnaires on diet, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use, cancer screening, family history of cancer, and environmental exposures. Measurement data were collected on blood pressure, height, weight, waist/hip circumference, fasting serum lipids, and glucose. Cancer risk factors are high for the Alaska EARTH study population. For all risk factors studied except for vegetable consumption, Alaska EARTH Study participants did not meet Healthy People 2010 goals. This study is unique in providing questionnaire and measurement data of cancer risk factors on a larger study sample than any previous study among AN living in Alaska. Data show that the prevalence of most cancer risk factors exceeded national recommendations. Given the disease disparities that exist for the AN population, these data provide important baseline data that can be used to target health interventions and reduce health disparities.
PubMed ID
22298198 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and university student drinking--not a class act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186688
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):13-6, 35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wayne Mitic
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):13-6, 35
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Health promotion
Humans
Social Environment
Social Marketing
Students - psychology
Universities
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):17-2112583664
PubMed ID
12583663 View in PubMed
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[An accreditation process for public health. Is is possible? Is it desirable?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160449
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Martin Beaumont
Madeleine E Drew
Andre-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Author Affiliation
Conseil canadien d'agrément des services de santé, Développement des marchés nationaux et internationaux, candidat au doctorat en santé publique, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal. martin.beaumont@cchsa-ccass.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):422-6
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - methods
Canada
Feasibility Studies
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Ontario
Population Surveillance
Public Health - standards
Public Health Administration - standards
Social Marketing
Abstract
The objective of this pan-Canadian study was to evaluate the feasibility of developing a set of accreditation standards supported by an accreditation process for public health in Canada.
Twenty-four telephone interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed and analyzed.
The scope of public health implied in respondents' answers included health protection, health promotion, disease prevention and surveillance. A large majority of the experts were in favour of implementing accreditation in public health. Of these, close to two thirds answered that public health needed its own standards to address some of the current gaps. People in health systems were faster to question the relevance of separate standards for public health to avoid creating artificial barriers within the continuum of care. Respondents who opposed an accreditation process for public health cited the lack of capacity currently in the system. Yet, proponents argued that accreditation could actually be used as a capacity-building tool and assist "to fight the tyranny of the urgent". Some identified the actual process of developing accreditation standards for public health as being a valuable exercise.
It appears that public health in Canada would benefit from an accreditation process developed in consultation with the field, to enhance visibility, capacity building, and performance through pan-Canadian standards which would also have to be flexible enough to accommodate specific provincial and local contexts.
PubMed ID
17985688 View in PubMed
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An exploration of empowerment discourse within home-care nurses' accounts of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137457
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Laura M Funk
Kelli I Stajduhar
Mary Ellen Purkis
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. lmfunk@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2011 Mar;18(1):66-76
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Family Relations
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Palliative Care - methods
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Marketing
Abstract
In this study, we explore how client and family caregiver 'empowerment' is interpreted by home-care nurses talking about their practice with palliative (and to a lesser extent, non-palliative) clients and families. We draw on secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through in-person interviews with 27 home-care nurses from a western Canadian health authority. First, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'respecting autonomy and choices', can be understood as reflecting home-care nurses' needs to mitigate the emotional impact of feeling unable to effectively help palliative clients/families. Then, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'promoting independence', can be understood to accomplish the need to shift responsibility for particular care tasks to clients and family members. Lastly, home-care nurses, talk about 'promoting choices' is also investigated. 'Choice' was framed narrowly with respect to allowing palliative clients and families to determine visit time and frequency. Findings are discussed in relation to the concept of 'responsibilization'.
PubMed ID
21281397 View in PubMed
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153 records – page 1 of 16.