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Building capacity for risk factor surveillance in developed countries: the need for a vision-driven approach: lessons learned from the Canadian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173944
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50 Suppl 1:S25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Reg Warren
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion, University of Toronto, Ottawa, Canada. dynamic@ca.inter.net
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50 Suppl 1:S25-30
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Education - utilization
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Resource Allocation - statistics & numerical data
Social Justice - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This paper examines the question of capacity building for risk factor surveillance in developed countries, with reference to the Canadian experience. Special attention is accorded the issue of building capacity for utilization of surveillance information. The paper describes the development, evolution and current status of risk factor surveillance in Canada. It notes that there is evidence of ongoing improvement in surveillance capacities over the past 20 years, but that there remains considerable room for improvement--particularly in relation to building capacity for the utilization of surveillance information. A vision-driven approach to capacity building is recommended and described building upon concepts and principles followed by international organizations addressing analogous issues.
PubMed ID
16003915 View in PubMed
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Does Organizational Justice Modify the Association Between Job Involvement and Retirement Intentions of Nurses in Finland?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282662
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2016 Oct;39(5):364-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Juhani Sulander
Timo Sinervo
Marko Elovainio
Tarja Heponiemi
Klaus Helkama
Anna-Mari Aalto
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2016 Oct;39(5):364-74
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Assisted Living Facilities
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Social Justice - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Given the growing aging population in Finland, retaining health staff to care for them is important. In an exploration of predictors of quitting before the typical retirement age, which ranges from 63 to 68 years in Finland, we examined whether organizational justice moderated the association between job involvement and retirement intentions among nurses 50 years and over. The sample was 446 nurses (70% practical nurses) working in 134 assisted living facilities providing 24-hour care for older residents in Finland. Job involvement was measured with the Job Involvement Questionnaire, and organizational justice with a scale that tapped its three dimensions: distributive justice, procedural justice, and interactional justice. In covariance analyses, low organizational justice and low job involvement were associated with a higher likelihood of retirement intention. Both interactional justice and procedural justice moderated the association of job involvement with retirement intentions. Among nurses with low job involvement, those who experienced unjust treatment, that is, low interactional justice, and evaluated organizational procedures as unjust had significantly stronger retirement intentions than nurses with high levels of interactional and procedural justice. Distributive justice was associated with retirement intentions in both high and low job-involved respondents. Organizational justice may act as a buffer against retirement intention as one consequence of nurses' low job involvement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
27348502 View in PubMed
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Social justice, access and quality of healthcare in an age of austerity: users' perspective from rural Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287210
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1347476
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Sonja S Gustafsdottir
Kristjana Fenger
Sigridur Halldorsdottir
Thoroddur Bjarnason
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1347476
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Equity - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland
Male
Poverty
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Justice - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Iceland is sparsely populated but social justice and equity has been emphasised within healthcare. The aim of the study is to examine healthcare services in Fjallabyggð, in rural northern Iceland, from users' perspective and evaluate social justice, access and quality of healthcare in an age of austerity. Mixed-method approach with transformative design was used. First, data were collected with questionnaires (response rate of 53% [N=732] in 2009 and 30% [N=415] in 2012), and analysed statistically, followed by 10 interviews with healthcare users (2009 and 2014). The results were integrated and interpreted within Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Model. There was significantly less satisfaction with accessibility and variety of healthcare services in 2012 after services downsizing. Solid primary healthcare, good local elderly care, some freedom in healthcare choice and reliable emergency services were considered fundamental for life in a rural area. Equal access to healthcare is part of a fundamental human right. In times of economic downturn, people in rural areas, who are already vulnerable, may become even more vulnerable and disadvantaged, seriously threatening social justice and equity. With severe cutbacks in vitally important healthcare services people may eventually choose to self-migrate.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28762300 View in PubMed
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