Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

15 records – page 1 of 2.

Anencephalic infants as organ sources: should the law be changed? Yes--the law on anencephalic infants as organ sources should be changed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229854
Source
J Pediatr. 1989 Nov;115(5 Pt 1):824-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
J W Walters
Author Affiliation
Ethics Center, Loma Linda University, CA 92350.
Source
J Pediatr. 1989 Nov;115(5 Pt 1):824-8
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly
Canada
Death
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 1990 Jul;117(1 Pt 1):164-52370604
PubMed ID
2809918 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):244
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gilles Paradis
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):244
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Population Groups - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2009 Sep-Oct;100(5):39719994747
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):258-6219722337
PubMed ID
19722333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Backlash or equality?: The influence of men's and women's rights discourses on domestic violence legislation in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154186
Source
Violence Against Women. 2009 Jan;15(1):5-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
April L Girard
Author Affiliation
Queen's University.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2009 Jan;15(1):5-23
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Legislation as Topic
Male
Men's Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Problems
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence
Spouses - legislation & jurisprudence
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Through an examination of the public debates from Ontario's Bill 117, An Act to Better Protect Victims of Domestic Violence, this article explores the discourses that men's rights activists used to counter feminist constructions of domestic violence. Using a combined method, the author collapses the data into four important themes: protection, rights, and gender; funding and fairness; numerical and statistical truths; and resistance. By examining how they collectively construct the problem of domestic violence, the author exposes the ways in which men's rights advocates disqualify women's experiences and the responses to such claims.
PubMed ID
19015392 View in PubMed
Less detail

The compliant court--procedural fairness and social control in compulsory community care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265094
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):543-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liv Zetterberg
Stefan Sjöström
Urban Markström
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):543-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Dangerous Behavior
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Male
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
Abstract
Compulsory community care (CCC) was introduced in Sweden in 2008. This article investigates all written court decisions regarding CCC over a 6 month period in 2009 (N=541). The purpose is to examine how the legal rights of patients are protected and what forms of social control patients are subjected to. 51% of CCC patients are women and 84% are being treated for a psychosis-related disorder. In the court decisions, only 9% of patients are described as dangerous to themselves, while 18% are regarded a danger to others. The most common special provisions that patients are subjected to are medication (79%) and a requirement that they must maintain contact with either community mental health services (51%) or social services (27%). In the decisions, both the courts and court-appointed psychiatrists agree with treating psychiatrists in 99% of cases. Decisions lack transparency and clarity, and it is often impossible to understand the conclusions of the courts. There is considerable variation between regional courts as regards the provisions to which patients are subjected and the delegation of decision-making to psychiatrists. This means that decisions fail to demonstrate clarity, transparency, consistency and impartiality, and thus fail to meet established standards of procedural fairness. Surveillance techniques of social control are more common than techniques based on therapy or sanctions. Because of the unique role of medication, social control is primarily imposed on a physical dimension, as opposed to temporal and spatial forms. The article concludes that patients are at risk of being subjected to new forms of social control of an unclear nature without proper legal protection.
PubMed ID
24656218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences in reconciling risk management and restorative justice: how circles of support and accountability work restoratively in the risk society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128479
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2013 Mar;57(3):269-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Stacey Hannem
Author Affiliation
Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford Campus, Brantford, Ontario, Canada. shannem@wlu.ca
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2013 Mar;57(3):269-88
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Mentors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ontario
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Punishment
Risk Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Safety Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Desirability
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Volunteers
Abstract
Circles of Support and Accountability (COSA) is a restorative justice-based model that originated in Canada in the mid-1990s for the postincarceration reintegration of those who have offended sexually. Although the roots of COSA are in restorative justice philosophy, the program has also found favour, to some degree, with organisations such as police services and corrections that are traditionally concerned more with protecting community safety than with the ideals of restorative justice. Informed by the author's research and personal experience as a COSA volunteer, and analysis of recent and historical representations of COSA, this article explores theoretically how the development of the COSA initiative has been influenced by the seemingly disparate concerns of both the restorative justice and community protection movements, and examines the importance of balancing these paradigms in the everyday practices of circles.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2013 Mar;57(3):267-823439688
PubMed ID
22200602 View in PubMed
Less detail

How can forensic systems improve justice for victims of offenders found not criminally responsible?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105691
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2013;41(4):568-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jason Quinn
Alexander I F Simpson
Author Affiliation
MB, ChB, BMedSci, Unit 3, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 1001 Queen Street West, Toronto M6J 1H4, ON, Canada. sandy.simpson@camh.ca.
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2013;41(4):568-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crime Victims - psychology
Humans
Insanity Defense
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Controversy has arisen surrounding findings of not criminally responsible (NCR) or not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) in recent years. In some countries, the debate has been driven by the concerns of victims, who are seeking greater information on discharge, accountability on the part of the offender, and involvement in the disposition of NCR or NGRI perpetrators. Their demands raise questions about proportionality between the seriousness of the index offense and the disposition imposed, the place of retribution in the NCR regimen, and the ethics-related challenges that emerge from this tension. We conducted a literature review focused on the relationship of victims to NCR and NGRI processes. The literature is limited. However, theoretical reasoning suggests that interventions based on restorative justice principles reduce persistently negative feelings and increase a sense of justice for victims of criminally responsible defendants. Opportunities and problems with extending such processes into the area of mentally abnormal offenders are discussed.
PubMed ID
24335331 View in PubMed
Less detail

[International and national legal mechanisms of ensuring social justice for the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258674
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A Kh Abashidze
V S Malichenko
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Health Policy
Health Transition
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Internationality
National Health Programs
Needs Assessment
Population Dynamics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Work - organization & administration
Abstract
Increase in the proportion of older persons in the population of most countries entails a change in the scale and structure of morbidity, which requires higher expenditures on health care and social service. Maintaining health and activity of older people is an important indicator of the effectiveness of public policies in the field of health and social welfare. Under these conditions the development of effective measures to promote prosperous aging is required, which includes primarily legislative, administrative and other measures, as well as development of a strategy and action plan of socio-economic nature, taking into account the needs of older people.
PubMed ID
25306661 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.