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458 records – page 1 of 46.

Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Mar 5;16(5):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1992
Author
K. Nyman
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Mar 5;16(5):3
Date
Mar-5-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Pensions
Retirement
Social Justice
Sweden
PubMed ID
1636316 View in PubMed
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Enviro-Health Links - Environmental Justice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288463
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Publications
Other Publications Databases
Social Justice
Environment
Abstract
This National Library of Medicine (NLM) Enviro-Health Links site provides links and descriptions to environmental justice sites.
Online Resources
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'We don't want to manage poverty': community groups politicise food insecurity and charitable food donations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167514
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(1):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Melanie Rock
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Department of Community Health Sciences, Health Sciences Centre, Canada. mrock@ucalgary.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(1):36-41
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Charities
Food Supply
Humans
Poverty
Social Justice
Abstract
Charitable assistance is a common response to food insecurity in many affluent countries. The coalition featured in this case study is explicitly concerned with social justice, mitigating the potential for charitable assistance to mask the extent of food insecurity, its root causes and its long-term consequences. The coalition structure has assisted community workers in transcending day-to-day routines, so as to reflect on the politics of food insecurity and institutionalised responses to this problem. Coalition members have defined food security as an objective whose achievement will entail comprehensive reform. One noteworthy outcome has been to recommend that member groups not redistribute a number of foodstuffs commonly donated by individuals and corporations. In grappling with a tension between responding to immediate needs for food and addressing the root causes of these needs, community workers have paid attention to public health.
PubMed ID
16970003 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gilles Paradis
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Public Health
Social Justice
PubMed ID
23618632 View in PubMed
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Using the table in the Swedish review on shaken baby syndrome will not help courts deliver justice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295650
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 07; 106(7):1043-1045
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
07-2017
Author
Robert A C Bilo
Sibylle Banaschak
Bernd Herrmann
Wouter A Karst
Bela Kubat
Hubert G T Nijs
Rick R van Rijn
Jan Sperhake
Arne Stray-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Section on Forensic Pediatrics, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 07; 106(7):1043-1045
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Child Abuse
Humans
Infant
Shaken Baby Syndrome
Social Justice
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul;106(7):1021-1027 PMID 28130787
CommentIn: Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul;106(7):1046 PMID 28440883
PubMed ID
28374456 View in PubMed
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Health-care access as a social determinant of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154706
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Elizabeth McGibbon
Josephine Etowa
Charmaine McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish , Nova Scotia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Nursing
Social Justice
Abstract
The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as important indicators of health and well-being. Health-care services (primary, secondary, tertiary care) have not until recently been considered an SDH. Inequities in access to health care are changing this view. These inequities include barriers faced by certain population groups at point of care, such as the lack of cultural competence of health-care providers. The authors show how a social justice perspective can help nurses understand how to link inequities in access to poorer health outcomes, and they call on nurses to break the cycle of oppression that contributes to these inequities.
PubMed ID
18856224 View in PubMed
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[Take sides against injustice. Interview by Siv Barstad.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49153
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Nov 2;81(18):12-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1993
Author
O. Aschjem
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Nov 2;81(18):12-3
Date
Nov-2-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Domestic Violence
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing
Social Justice
PubMed ID
8024885 View in PubMed
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Mainstreaming social justice: human rights and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176396
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Madine VanderPlaat
Nair Teles
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Criminology, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3. madine.vanderplaat@smu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):34-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Human Rights
Humans
Public Health - ethics
Social Justice
Abstract
Our interest in a human rights and health discourse emerges from our efforts as social scientists to bring a meaningful social justice perspective to the realm of public health. In Canada, as in many countries, "health" is still firmly within the domain of the biomedical and the clinical. While considerable effort has been made to include more social, economic, and cultural perspectives, efforts to frame these issues as political phenomena have tended to be polarized into either a rich body of theoretical literature or case studies of interventions which have in varying degrees incorporated a social justice approach. What is still missing is a framework of discourse that allows various concepts of social justice to inform policy, intervention strategies, evaluation and evidence-based measures of effectiveness. This commentary examines the human rights discourse as conceptual space from which to build this framework.
PubMed ID
15682691 View in PubMed
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American International Health Alliance joins Medical Advocates for Social Justice to launch HIV/AIDS Russian language Internet partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195703
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):90-1
Publication Type
Article
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):90-1
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
HIV Infections
Humans
International Cooperation
Internet
Language
Russia
Social Justice
United States
PubMed ID
11211677 View in PubMed
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The white (male) effect and risk perception: can equality make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137919
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jun;31(6):1016-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anna Olofsson
Saman Rashid
Author Affiliation
Risk and Crisis Research Center, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden. anna.olofsson@miun.se
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jun;31(6):1016-32
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Male
Risk
Social Justice
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Previous research has shown that white males have a relatively low perception of risks, known as the "white male effect" (WME). Many of the explanations of this effect refer to the privileged position of this particular demographic group in society, adducing white males' socio-economic resources, sense of control, worldviews, etc. It can thus be argued that inequality leads women and ethnic minorities to have higher risk perception than men and the ethnic majority. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the WME in a gender-equal country, Sweden, to see if the pattern is similar to previous studies from the comparably less gender-equal United States. The empirical analyses are based on a national survey (n= 1,472) on the perception of risk conducted in Sweden in the winter of 2005. The results show that in Sweden there is no significant difference between men and women in risk perception, while people with foreign backgrounds perceive risks higher than native people. The chief finding is that there is no WME in Sweden, which we concluded results from the relative equality between the sexes in the country. On the other hand, ethnicity serves as a marker of inequality and discrimination in Sweden. Consequently, ethnicity, in terms of foreign background, mediates inequality, resulting in high risk perception. Equality therefore seems to be a fruitful concept with which to examine differences in risk perception between groups in society, and we propose that the "societal inequality effect" is a more proper description than the "WME."
PubMed ID
21232063 View in PubMed
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458 records – page 1 of 46.