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270 records – page 1 of 27.

Defend or repair? Explaining responses to in-group moral failure by disentangling feelings of shame, rejection, and inferiority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126815
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 May;102(5):941-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Nicolay Gausel
Colin Wayne Leach
Vivian L Vignoles
Rupert Brown
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Centre for Emotion Research, Østfold University College, Norway. nicolay.gausel@hiof.no
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 May;102(5):941-60
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Compensation and Redress
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Models, Psychological
Morals
Motivation
Norway
Prejudice
Psychology, Social
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Shame
Social Distance
Social Identification
Abstract
Research on shame about in-group moral failure has yielded paradoxical results. In some studies, shame predicts self-defensive motivations to withdraw. In other studies, shame predicts pro-social motivations, such as restitution. We think that this paradox can be explained by disentangling the numerous appraisals and feelings subsumed under the label "shame." In 2 studies, we asked community samples of Norwegians about their in-group's discrimination against the Tater minority. Confirmatory factor analysis validated the measures of the appraisals and feelings used in Study 1 (N = 206) and Study 2 (N = 173). In both studies, an appraisal of the in-group as suffering a moral defect best predicted felt shame, whereas an appraisal of concern for condemnation of the in-group best predicted felt rejection. In both studies, felt rejection best predicted self-defensive motivation, whereas felt shame best predicted pro-social motivation. Implications for conceptualizing and studying shame are discussed.
PubMed ID
22352324 View in PubMed
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Becoming normal: a grounded theory study on the emotional process of stroke recovery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126955
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2011;33(3):24-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Patti Gallagher
Author Affiliation
Horizon Health Zone 2, New Brunswick. patti.gallagher@horizonNB.ca
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2011;33(3):24-32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Emotions
Humans
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Motivation
Narration
Recovery of Function
Social Identification
Stroke - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this grounded theory study was to examine the emotional process of stroke recovery, personally experienced by stroke survivors. Nine stroke survivors living in Atlantic Canada participated in this study. Data collection came from formal unstructured interviews and one group interview. The central problem experienced by these stroke survivors was being less than 100%. The basic social process used to address this problem was becoming normal, which is composed of three stages: recognizing stroke will not go away, choosing to work on recovery, and working on being normal. Each stage has several phases. Being less than 100% is the emotional result of being unable to do certain things that serve to form individuals' identities. A critical finding was that physical and emotional recovery is inseparable, and recovery is directed towards regaining the ability to perform these certain things. Becoming normal was influenced both positively and negatively by the following conditions: personal strengths and attributes, past history, family support, professional support, faith and comparing self to peers. The results of this study have implications for nursing practice, nursing education and nursing research. It adds to nursing knowledge by illuminating the close relationship between physical and emotional recovery, the duration of the stroke recovery process, and the necessity for survivors to make a deliberate choice to recover.
PubMed ID
22338210 View in PubMed
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The role of peer groups in male and female adolescents' task values and physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134929
Source
Psychol Rep. 2011 Feb;108(1):75-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Sami Yli-Piipari
Timo Jaakkola
Jarmo Liukkonen
Noona Kiuru
Anthony Watt
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27420-6170, USA. srylipii@ucng.edu
Source
Psychol Rep. 2011 Feb;108(1):75-93
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Motor Activity
Peer Group
Physical Education and Training
Sex Factors
Social Facilitation
Social Identification
Social Values
Abstract
The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of peer groups and sex in adolescents' task values and physical activity. The participants were 330 Finnish Grade 6 students (173 girls, 157 boys), who responded to questionnaires that assessed physical education task values during the spring semester (Time 1). Students' physical activity was assessed one year later (Time 2). The results indicated that adolescent peer groups were moderately homogeneous in terms of task values toward physical education and physical activity. Girls' peer groups were more homogeneous than those of boys in regards to utility and attainment values. Furthermore, the results for both girls and boys showed that particularly intrinsic task value typical for the peer group predicted group members' physical activity. The findings highlight the important role of peer group membership as a determinant of future physical activity.
PubMed ID
21526593 View in PubMed
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Co-offending and the diversification of crime types.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134990
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2012 Aug;56(5):811-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Martin A Andresen
Marcus Felson
Author Affiliation
School of Criminology, Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. andresen@sfu.ca
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2012 Aug;56(5):811-29
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
British Columbia
Causality
Child
Crime - classification - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence
Recurrence
Risk factors
Social Facilitation
Social Identification
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There is theoretical and empirical support for co-offending being important not only for understanding current offending but also subsequent offending. The fundamental question is--why? In this article, an aggregate analysis is performed that begins to answer this question. Disaggregating solo- and co-offending by single year of age (12-29 years) and crime type in a largely metropolitan data set from British Columbia, Canada, 2002 to 2006, it is shown that the distribution of co-offences is significantly more varied than the distribution of solo offences. This more varied distribution of co-offences favors property crimes during youth but fades as offenders age.
PubMed ID
21518703 View in PubMed
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Independent and joint effects of personality on intentions to become an active participant in local union activities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104598
Source
J Psychol. 2014 Mar-Apr;148(2):145-59
Publication Type
Article
Author
Deborah M McPhee
Greg J Sears
Willi H Wiesner
Source
J Psychol. 2014 Mar-Apr;148(2):145-59
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Canada
Conscience
Consumer Participation
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Intention
Internal-External Control
Introversion (Psychology)
Labor Unions
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Personality
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Social Identification
Abstract
Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this field study (N = 282) investigates the impact of two focal personality traits, extraversion and conscientiousness, on employees' attitudes and intentions to actively participate in their local union. Consistent with the TPB, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and attitudes toward participation each explained unique variance in union participation intentions. Furthermore, results revealed that extraversion was positively related, and conscientiousness was negatively related to participation intentions, with attitudes toward participation mediating these effects. A significant interaction between extraversion and conscientiousness was also observed, such that introverted workers higher in conscientiousness were less inclined to express positive attitudes toward union participation. Overall, these results provide support for the utility of the TPB in predicting union participation intentions and highlight the vital role that personality traits may play in determining union participation attitudes and intentions.
PubMed ID
24684076 View in PubMed
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Holland in Iceland revisited: an emic approach to evaluating U.S. vocational interest models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138843
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Sif Einarsdóttir
James Rounds
Rong Su
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. sif@hi.is
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):361-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Career Choice
Character
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Iceland
Male
Models, Psychological
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Social Desirability
Social Identification
Students - psychology
United States
Vocational Guidance
Young Adult
Abstract
An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdóttir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data included an indigenous pool of occupations and work-task items representing Iceland's world of work that had been administered to a sample of 597 upper secondary school students. Multidimensional scaling analysis and property vector fitting using Prediger's (1981) work-task dimensions were applied to the item responses to test if the RIASEC model could be identified. The results indicated that a 4-dimensional solution better explains the interest space in Iceland than Holland's 2-dimensional RIASEC representation. The work-task dimension of People-Things and the Sex-Type and Prestige dimensions were located in the 1st and 2nd dimensions of the multidimensional scaling solution, but Data-Ideas, a dimension critical to the RIASEC model, was not. The 3rd and 4th dimensions did not correspond to any dimensions previously detected in structural studies in the United States and seem to be related to specific ecological, cultural, and political forces in Iceland. These results demonstrate the importance of selecting representative indigenous occupations and work tasks when evaluating the RIASEC model. The present study is an example of the next step in a comprehensive cross-cultural research program on vocational interests, an emic investigation.
PubMed ID
21133585 View in PubMed
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Peer group self-identification in samples of Russian and U.S. adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138845
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(2):203-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Steve Sussman
Meghan B Moran
Ping Sun
Pallav Pokhrel
Melissa Gunning
Louise A Rohrbach
Vadim Kniazev
Radik Masagutov
Author Affiliation
Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, University of Southern California, Alhambra, CA 91803, USA. ssussma@usc.edu
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(2):203-15
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Los Angeles
Male
Peer Group
Russia
Social Identification
United States
Abstract
Most peer group self-identification research has been conducted in the United States. This article examined the generalizability of self-identified group name research among teens in Ufa, a city in the Russian Federation. A cross-sectional, anonymous collection of data on group self-identification, drug use, addiction concern, sensation seeking, and self-rated school performance was collected from 365 10th grade youth in Ufa and 965 10th grade youth in the United States. The results supported the existence of peer group self-identification by youth in both countries and, in general, replicated the findings that youth who self-identify as a High Risk Youth, are relatively likely to use drugs, show greater concern about becoming an addict, report a greater sensation seeking preference, higher levels of depression, and poorer school performance. Implications of these results are discussed.
PubMed ID
21133332 View in PubMed
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The story about theater organizations, the public's approval, and the actors' identity formation in Nordic disability theater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139085
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):254-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Rikke Gürgens Gjærum
Jens Ineland
Lennart Sauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Harstad University, Harstad, Norway.
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):254-73
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autistic Disorder - rehabilitation
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Drama
Humans
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
Mass Media
Models, organizational
Norway
Public Opinion
Social Identification
Social Work - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
Nordic disability theater is a relatively new and interesting field of disability research. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the field of disability theater in a Nordic context. The article is based on a comparative analysis from 3 research projects conducted in Sweden and Norway. The projects used qualitative methods and were analyzed from different theoretical perspectives. Interviews were conducted at 4 different disability theaters involving actors with hearing impairments, intellectual disabilities, physical disabilities, and mental disabilities. The aim of this article is to illustrate how the organizational settings reflect different goals and aims at the political and artistic levels. The authors will also address the relationship between the theaters and the public opinion and media. Finally, they will illustrate in what way organization, recognition, and public approval play an important role for the actors' identity formation and sense of belonging.
PubMed ID
21104515 View in PubMed
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Giving birth. Perceptions of Finnish childbearing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195813
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2001 Jan-Feb;26(1):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
L C Callister
K. Vehvilainen-Julkunen
S. Lauri
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, Brigham Young University, 500 SWKT, P.O. Box 25532, Provo, Utah 84602, USA. Lynn_Callister@byu.edu
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2001 Jan-Feb;26(1):28-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Labor, Obstetric
Maternal-Child Nursing
Natural Childbirth
Perception
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Self Concept
Social Identification
Abstract
To describe the lived experience of childbirth with women giving birth in Finland.
Phenomenology.
Twenty Finnish women who had recently given birth were interviewed within 2 weeks following childbirth, sharing their perceptions of meaning of their childbirth experiences. Culturally appropriate strategies for qualitative data collection were employed. Trustworthiness of the data was ensured.
The richness and diversity of the childbirth experience emerged from the data. One theme identified was a sense of awe at the creation of a new life within the context of birth as a bittersweet paradox. A strong sense of maternal confidence or self-efficacy was identified, which influenced the women's perception of and management of childbirth pain. Feelings of self-actualization were articulated as Finnish women successfully negotiated a challenging life event.
Perinatal nurses should increase their sensitivity to the socio-cultural context of giving birth by acknowledging women's experiences as legitimate sources of knowledge.
PubMed ID
11198452 View in PubMed
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Gay youth in four cultures: a comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52904
Source
J Homosex. 1989;17(3-4):299-314
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M W Ross
Author Affiliation
STD Services, South Australian Health Commission, Adelaide.
Source
J Homosex. 1989;17(3-4):299-314
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Australia
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Finland
Gender Identity
Homosexuality - psychology
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Ireland
Male
Psychosexual Development
Social Identification
Sweden
Abstract
Young and older homosexual men in four countries (Sweden, Finland, Ireland, and Australia) were compared on a number of psychological, social, and psychometric indices to determine what differences existed between them, and the effect of culture on any such differences. Data show that there are greater differences between younger and older homosexual men as the culture appears more antihomosexual, and that younger homosexual men are less likely to accept their sexual orientation and more likely to accept myths surrounding homosexuality. Younger homosexual men were also more likely to have had gonorrhea (regardless of their number of sexual partners), to prefer receptive anal intercourse, and to have contacted partners by cruising. These data confirm that mental health consequences of antihomosexual environments are most negative where homosexuality is most severely stigmatized.
PubMed ID
2760454 View in PubMed
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270 records – page 1 of 27.