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1738 records – page 1 of 174.

A 25-year follow-up study of drug addicts hospitalised for acute hepatitis: present and past morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7324
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanne Rogne Gjeruldsen
Bjørn Myrvang
Stein Opjordsmoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. s.m.r.gieruldsen@iwoks.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Environment
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate present and past morbidity in drug addicts, 25 years after hospitalisation for acute hepatitis B or hepatitis nonA-nonB. The hospital records for 214 consecutively admitted patients were analysed, and a follow-up study on 66 of the 144 patients still alive was performed. At follow-up, 1 of 54 (1.8%) hepatitis B patients was still HBsAg positive. Twelve patients originally diagnosed as hepatitis nonA-nonB were all among 54 found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) positive, and the total anti-HCV prevalence was 81.8%. Twelve (22.2%) of the HCV cases were unknown before the follow-up examination. Four (6.1%) participants were anti-human immunodeficiency virus positive, only 1 was on antiretroviral therapy, and none had developed AIDS. Other chronic somatic diseases were a minor problem, whereas drug users reported skin infections as a frequent complication. Forty-three patients (65%) had abandoned addictive drugs since the hospital stay. Serious mental disorders were reported by 19 patients (28.8%), and 17 (25.8%) regarded themselves as present (9) and former (8) compulsive alcohol drinkers. A large proportion of the participants were granted disability pension (39%), a majority because of psychiatric disorders, drug and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
12644734 View in PubMed
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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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The 120-S minute: using analysis of work activity to prevent psychological distress among elementary school teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209722
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Messing
A M Seifert
E. Escalona
Author Affiliation
Centre Pour l'Etude des Interactions Biologiques Entre la Santé et l'Environment (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. messing.karen@uqam.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - prevention & control
Teaching
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Primary school teachers in Québec suffer psychological distress, as shown by the Québec Health Survey (M. Gervais, 1993; Santè Québec, 1995). The authors applied and extended the French model (F. Guérin, A. Laville, F. Daniellou, J. Duraffourg, & A. Kerguelen, 1991) of analysis of work activity to observing classroom teaching (14 women in 10 classrooms for a total of 48 hr 24 min) to identify stressful elements. The authors observed a rapid sequence of actions, eye fixations of short duration, little physical or mental relaxation, multiple simultaneous activities, and uncomfortable temperature and humidity levels. Teachers use many strategies to teach, to create a learning environment, and to maintain attention in classrooms under adverse conditions. Examination of these strategies led to recommendations to improve relations between the teachers and their supervisors and to make the classroom an easier place to teach.
PubMed ID
9552279 View in PubMed
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1992 Genetics Society of Canada Award of Excellence Lecture: Genes, science, and society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220545
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
C R Scriver
Author Affiliation
DeBelle Laboratory, McGill University-Montreal Children's Hospital Research Institute, QC, Canada.
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - genetics - history
Animals
Awards and Prizes
Canada
Child
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Genetics - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mice
Rickets - genetics - history
Social Environment
Societies, Scientific
PubMed ID
8405982 View in PubMed
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Ability-based notions of health and disease in the Norwegian social security system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133644
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jun 3;131(11):1097-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-2011
Author
Hans Magnus Solli
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Vestfold Mental Health Care Trust, Norway. hmsolli@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jun 3;131(11):1097-100
Date
Jun-3-2011
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Goals
Health status
Humans
Insurance, Health
Norway
Philosophy, Medical
Social Environment
Social Security
Work Capacity Evaluation
PubMed ID
21681241 View in PubMed
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Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect experienced by aging chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130694
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - ethnology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The traditional values of Chinese culture promote care and respect toward older adults. While it appears to be ironic to discuss issues of abuse and neglect in the Chinese culture, research findings in Chinese societies do indicate the occurrences of such problems. However, little research on the abuse and neglect of older Chinese in Western societies has been available. This study aims to examine the incidence of abuse and neglect and the associated correlates based on data collected from a random sample of 2,272 aging Chinese 55 years and older in seven Canadian cities. The findings show that 4.5% of the participants reported experiencing at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect within the past year. The most common forms of neglect and abuse experienced by the aging Chinese include being scolded, yelled at, treated impolitely all the time, and ridiculed. Close family members such as spouses and sons are those that most commonly maltreat older Chinese. Those who were more likely to report at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect were older adults living with others; they tended to have no education, more access barriers, more chronic illnesses, less favorable mental health, and a higher level of identification with Chinese cultural values. The findings implied that the face value of respect and care received by older people in Chinese culture should not be taken for granted. Culturally appropriate precautionary steps are needed for prevention and early problem identification.
PubMed ID
21978291 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect of American Indian children: findings from a survey of federal providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5117
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J M Piasecki
S M Manson
M P Biernoff
A B Hiat
S S Taylor
D W Bechtold
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Child abuse and neglect is of growing concern in many American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The present paper represents one attempt to add to the existing, albeit sparse, knowledge base concerning the abuse and neglect of American Indian children. It reports the results of a survey of federal human service providers in which the subject of child abuse and neglect in Indian communities figured prominently. The study took place at several locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Data were obtained using the key-informant method from 55 federal service providers who identified 1,155 children, from birth to 21 years for inclusion in the survey. Children were included if they were currently in mental health treatment, if they were in need of mental health treatment, or if they were known to have been abused or neglected. Particular emphasis was given in the data collection to abuse- and neglect-related factors such as living arrangements, familial disruption, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, and school adjustment. The patterns evident in this sample closely resemble those trends identified among abused and/or neglected children in the general population. Sixty-seven percent of the sample was described as neglected or abused. The presence of abuse and/or neglect was strongly related to severe levels of chaos in the family. Children who were described as both abused and neglected had more psychiatric symptoms, greater frequency of having run away or been expelled, and greater frequency of drug use.
PubMed ID
2490293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abusers of alcohol immediately prior to pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12864
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
M. Elton
J O Hörnquist
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jul;68(1):44-54
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Brain Damage, Chronic - chemically induced
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In the granting of a disability pension to an alcohol abuser society is taking a somewhat controversial step. In order to elucidate the overall situation of these abusers, the quality of life of 61 abusing applicants was examined. The sample represents all 78 first-time applicants during an 18-month period in a geographically defined region in the county of Ostergötland in Sweden. As expected, apart from their extensive abuse, the applicants were in bad psychiatric-psychological condition and demonstrated severe neuro-psychological and biochemical disturbances. In addition, their social network was somewhat restricted and also otherwise rather problematic. These deviations were evident in relation to a matched group of newly pensioned non-abusers. In comparison with another more closely matched group of abusers undergoing rehabilitation, the differences appeared mainly within the psychiatric-psychological sphere. This is a report in a series from the research project "Abuse of alcohol - Disability pension - Quality of life".
PubMed ID
6613619 View in PubMed
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Academic self-efficacy mediates the effects of school psychological climate on academic achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277760
Source
Sch Psychol Q. 2015 Mar;30(1):64-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Rune Høigaard
Velibor Bobo Kovac
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Tommy Haugen
Source
Sch Psychol Q. 2015 Mar;30(1):64-74
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Norway
Schools
Self Efficacy
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth- and tenth- grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic achievement. The results of a bootstrapping technique used to analyze relationships between the constructs indicated that school-goal orientations and organizational citizenship predicted academic self-efficacy. Furthermore, school-goal orientation, organizational citizenship, and academic self-efficacy explained 46% of the variance in academic achievement. Mediation analyses revealed that academic self-efficacy mediated the effects of perceived task goal structure, perceived ability structure, civic virtue, and sportsmanship on adolescents' academic achievements. The results are discussed in reference to current scholarship, including theories underlying our hypothesis. Practical implications and directions for future research are suggested.
PubMed ID
24708286 View in PubMed
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1738 records – page 1 of 174.