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506 records – page 1 of 51.

[Abilities and social conditions in an elderly Danish population. From the 80-year-old subjects Glostrup study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74438
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 16;142(25):1639-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-1980
Source
Katilolehti. 1982 Aug;87(7-8):227-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
R. Peltonen
Source
Katilolehti. 1982 Aug;87(7-8):227-31
Date
Aug-1982
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adult
Crime
Female
Finland
Human Rights
Humans
Pregnancy
Social Conditions
Statistics as Topic
PubMed ID
6923052 View in PubMed
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[Abortion is an expensive contraceptive]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66469
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 31;70(5):343
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1973

Academic performance and mental health in university students. A two-year follow-up study of a sample of first-year students at the University of Uppsala 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66502
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1973;239:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Academic stream and tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use among Ontario high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223837
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
K R Allison
Author Affiliation
North York Community Health Promotion Research Unit, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Competency-Based Education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology
Probability
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Conditions
Students
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between academic stream and cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use among 2,543 high school students as part of the Ontario Student Drug Survey (1987). Students in basic and general academic streams were found to have significantly higher levels of cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use compared to advanced level students. The effects of academic stream remain significant (except for alcohol use) when gender, grade average, drug education lessons, and pressure to use these substances are included in multiple regression analysis. The findings indicate that the process of academic streaming needs to be further examined as a possible precipitating factor in drug use.
PubMed ID
1601538 View in PubMed
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The acceptance of the cervical cytology screening programme in the province of British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111163
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Br Commonw. 1967 Aug;74(4):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1967
Source
Can Hosp. 1971 Mar;48(3):7 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1971
Author
B L Brosseau
Source
Can Hosp. 1971 Mar;48(3):7 passim
Date
Mar-1971
Language
Multiple languages
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug and Narcotic Control
Hospitals
Humans
Social Conditions
Substance-Related Disorders - therapy
PubMed ID
5547033 View in PubMed
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Acute illnesses in children. A description and analysis of the cumulative incidence proportion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36143
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of General Practice, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Models, Statistical
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Conditions
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To describe parent-reported morbidity in relation to the psycho-social conditions of the families and to characterize families whose children are frequently ill. DESIGN--The parent-reported morbidity in a two-month prospective period, and the psychosocial conditions of the families were registered by means of a questionnaire. The conditioned probability of parents' reporting an episode of illness was estimated by means of logistic regression analysis, taking the psycho-social conditions into consideration. SETTING--18,949 families with at least one child under the age of 8 years, resident in the County of Ringkjøbing in western Denmark at 1 March 1988. SUBJECTS--An age-stratified random sample of 1982 families was entered in the study. 1588 (82%) families returned the questionnaire. RESULTS--The parents reported considerable morbidity in their children. The cumulative incidence proportion (CIP) for the period was 48%. The multivariate analysis of the parent-reported morbidity led to the following main results: 1) the morbidity was greatest for children aged 6 to 18 months, after which it decreased with age, 2) there was interaction between the care conditions and the child's age--CIP for children up to two years was largest for the children who were cared for in daycare, while the CIP for the older children was largest for the children who were cared for at home, 3) if the parents reported that the child's siblings suffered from chronic or frequently recurring morbidity, the child's morbidity rate was significantly increased, 4) mothers with higher education reported more morbidity in their children than mothers without this education, and 5) parents with a high perception of the general health threat ("worried" parents) reported more morbidity than did parents with a low perception. CONCLUSIONS--The results made it possible to characterize families whose children were frequently reported ill.
PubMed ID
8272653 View in PubMed
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Adaptive comanagement for building resilience in social-ecological systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50613
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Per Olsson
Carl Folke
Fikret Berkes
Author Affiliation
Department of Systems Ecology and Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. potto@system.ecology.su.se
Source
Environ Manage. 2004 Jul;34(1):75-90
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecology
Ecosystem
Humans
Information Services
Knowledge
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Conditions
Sweden
Abstract
Ecosystems are complex adaptive systems that require flexible governance with the ability to respond to environmental feedback. We present, through examples from Sweden and Canada, the development of adaptive comanagement systems, showing how local groups self-organize, learn, and actively adapt to and shape change with social networks that connect institutions and organizations across levels and scales and that facilitate information flows. The development took place through a sequence of responses to environmental events that widened the scope of local management from a particular issue or resource to a broad set of issues related to ecosystem processes across scales and from individual actors, to group of actors to multiple-actor processes. The results suggest that the institutional and organizational landscapes should be approached as carefully as the ecological in order to clarify features that contribute to the resilience of social-ecological systems. These include the following: vision, leadership, and trust; enabling legislation that creates social space for ecosystem management; funds for responding to environmental change and for remedial action; capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental feedback; information flow through social networks; the combination of various sources of information and knowledge; and sense-making and arenas of collaborative learning for ecosystem management. We propose that the self-organizing process of adaptive comanagement development, facilitated by rules and incentives of higher levels, has the potential to expand desirable stability domains of a region and make social-ecological systems more robust to change.
PubMed ID
15383875 View in PubMed
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506 records – page 1 of 51.