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[3 reports on population health. Who will take care of my health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 16;88(42):3443-6, 3451-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1991

12-year trends in occupational class differences in short sickness absence among young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265140
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):441-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Sumanen Hilla
Lahti Jouni
Lahelma Eero
Pietiläinen Olli
Rahkonen Ossi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):441-4
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Occupations - classification
Sick Leave - trends
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Socioeconomic differences in sickness absence are well established among middle-aged employees but poorly known among younger employees, in particular for shorter spells. We examined trends in occupational class differences in short sickness absence among young women.
The data were obtained from the registers of the City of Helsinki, Finland, and included female employees aged 18-34 years from 2002 to 2013. Self-certified (1-3 days) sickness absence spells were examined. Occupational class was classified into four hierarchical categories. Joinpoint regression models were used to identify major changes in sickness absence trends.
Short sickness absence increased until 2008, after which it decreased in all occupational classes except manual workers. Differences in sickness absence between occupational classes remained over time. Routine non-manuals had the highest amount of short sickness absence, while managers and professionals had the smallest amount. Manual workers had somewhat less short sickness absence than routine non-manuals and semi-professionals.
The socioeconomic differences in short sickness absence were clear among young women but not fully consistent as routine non-manuals tended to have more sickness absence than manual workers. Preventive measures are needed to narrow socioeconomic differences in young women's sickness absence especially among routine non-manuals.
PubMed ID
25834066 View in PubMed
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A 30-year follow-up study of a child psychiatric clientele. I. Demographic description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68611
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
F W Larsen
V. Dahl
E. Hallum
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Psychiatry
Crime
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - mortality - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Class
Abstract
A register investigation was carried out as of December 31, 1980, with the aim of giving a broad description of a child psychiatric clientele 30 years after admission to hospital. The material consists of 322 patients--189 boys (59%) and 133 girls (41%)--who were admitted during the period 1949-1951 to the only 2 child psychiatric departments at that time in Denmark. We succeeded in identifying 93% of the patients. The mean age at the time of analysis was 38.6 years (range 32-46). The material was compared with the age-related Danish population by marital status, vocational education, and socioeconomic class. A total of 115 patients (36%) had been admitted to an adult psychiatric department, and 50 patients only once. A total of 95 patients (30%) had committed criminal offences and 12 had only committed traffic offences. A total of 60 patients (19%) had obtained disability pensions. During the 30-year follow-up period, 19 patients (6%) had died. A statistically significant extra mortality was found only for women. Four patients had committed suicide. By logistic regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation was found between criminal record and admission to psychiatric department and the variables: divorce, no vocational education, and lowest socioeconomic class. About 54% had managed well, judging by the variables employed.
PubMed ID
2330827 View in PubMed
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The 1000 Canadian faces of lupus: determinants of disease outcome in a large multiethnic cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151515
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Christine A Peschken
Steven J Katz
Earl Silverman
Janet E Pope
Paul R Fortin
Christian Pineau
C Douglas Smith
Hector O Arbillaga
Dafna D Gladman
Murray Urowitz
Michel Zummer
Ann Clarke
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba Arthritis Center, RR149-800 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1M4, Canada. cpeschken@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Income
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - economics - ethnology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort.
Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores.
We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment.
There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
PubMed ID
19369456 View in PubMed
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[7000 AID treatments, 660 pregnancies in 5 years in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65845
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Sep 17;77(38):3229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1980

Absences for sickness among children in day care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36550
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
M. Möttönen
M. Uhari
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child Day Care Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Finland - epidemiology
Food Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hygiene
Infant
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Social Class
Abstract
The number of days of absence because of sickness, recorded for all children in one city in Finland, cared for in municipal day care over a period of 2.5 years, was collected from the monthly figures kept by the city council office for accounting purposes. The average number of days of absence per child was 24 per year at child-care centers and 9 in family care (p
PubMed ID
1467617 View in PubMed
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Absolute rather than relative income is a better socioeconomic predictor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292715
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2017 05 04; 16(1):70
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-04-2017
Author
Sten Axelsson Fisk
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, CRC, Jan Waldeströms gata, 35, S-205 02, Malmö, Sweden. sten.axelsson_fisk@med.lu.se.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2017 05 04; 16(1):70
Date
05-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - economics - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
While psychosocial theory claims that socioeconomic status (SES), acting through social comparisons, has an important influence on susceptibility to disease, materialistic theory says that socioeconomic position (SEP) and related access to material resources matter more. However, the relative role of SEP versus SES in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk has still not been examined.
We investigated the association between SES/SEP and COPD risk among 667 094 older adults, aged 55 to 60, residing in Sweden between 2006 and 2011. Absolute income in five groups by population quintiles depicted SEP and relative income expressed as quintile groups within each absolute income group represented SES. We performed sex-stratified logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios and the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) to compare the discriminatory accuracy of SES and SEP in relation to COPD.
Even though both absolute (SEP) and relative income (SES) were associated with COPD risk, only absolute income (SEP) presented a clear gradient, so the poorest had a three-fold higher COPD risk than the richest individuals. While the AUC for a model including only age was 0.54 and 0.55 when including relative income (SES), it increased to 0.65 when accounting for absolute income (SEP). SEP rather than SES demonstrated a consistent association with COPD.
Our study supports the materialistic theory. Access to material resources seems more relevant to COPD risk than the consequences of low relative income.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28472960 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect of older persons in seven cities in seven countries in Europe: a cross-sectional community study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121931
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Feb;58(1):121-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Jutta Lindert
Juan de Luna
Francisco Torres-Gonzales
Henrique Barros
Elisabeth Ioannidi-Kopolou
Maria Gabriella Melchiorre
Mindaugas Stankunas
Gloria Macassa
Joaquim F J Soares
Author Affiliation
Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany. mail@jlindert.de
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Feb;58(1):121-32
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - classification
Female
Germany
Greece
Humans
Italy
Lithuania
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Portugal
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Social Class
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the prevalence rate of abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial, neglect) of older persons (AO) in seven cities from seven countries in Europe (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Sweden), and to assess factors potentially associated with AO.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 (n = 4,467, aged 60-84). Potentially associated factors were grouped into domains (domain 1: age, gender, migration history; domain 2: education, occupation; domain 3: marital status, living situation; domain 4: habitation, income, financial strain). We calculated odds ratios (OR) with their respective 95 % confidence intervals (CI).
Psychological AO was the most common form of AO, ranging from 10.4 % (95 % CI 8.1-13.0) in Italy to 29.7 % (95 % CI 26.2-33.5) in Sweden. Second most common form was financial AO, ranging from 1.8 % (95 % CI 0.9-3.2) in Sweden to 7.8 % (95 % CI 5.8-10.1) in Portugal. Less common was physical AO, ranging from 1.0 % (95 % CI 0.4-2.1) in Italy to 4.0 % (95 % CI 2.6-5.8 %) in Sweden. Sexual AO was least common, ranging from 0.3 (95 % CI 0.0-1.1) in Italy and Spain to 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.7-2.8) in Greece. Being from Germany (AOR 3.25, 95 % CI 2.34-4.51), Sweden (OR 3.16, 95 % CI 2.28-4.39) or Lithuania (AOR 2.45, 95 % CI 1.75-3.43) was associated with increased prevalence rates of AO.
Country of residence of older people is independent from the four assessed domains associated with AO. Life course perspectives on AO are highly needed to get better insight, and to develop and implement prevention strategies targeted at decreasing prevalence rates of AO.
PubMed ID
22864651 View in PubMed
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2729 records – page 1 of 273.