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2736 records – page 1 of 274.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 10;115(12):1545
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1995
Author
C D Jacobsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 10;115(12):1545
Date
May-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health status
Humans
Morbidity
Norway
Prejudice
Social Class
PubMed ID
7770867 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Social inequality and health--and so what?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206084
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1088-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
A K Jenum
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1088-9
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health status
Humans
Norway
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
9531836 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current trends in health of Russia's population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200546
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1999;(9):7-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
V I Starodubov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1999;(9):7-11
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Public Health - trends
Russia
Social Class
PubMed ID
10523974 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social class differences in infant mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59530
Source
BMJ. 1993 Jan 16;306(6871):211
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-1993
Author
D. Vågerö
D. Leon
Source
BMJ. 1993 Jan 16;306(6871):211
Date
Jan-16-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Great Britain
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Social Class
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 1992 Nov 14;305(6863):1227-81298260
Comment On: BMJ. 1992 Nov 14;305(6863):12281467743
PubMed ID
8443511 View in PubMed
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The relationship to alcoholism of occupation, class and employment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245396
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Oct;22(10):657-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1980
Author
L. Ojesjö
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Oct;22(10):657-66
Date
Oct-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Employment
Humans
Male
Occupations
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
The status of the labor market is of importance in the employment of alcoholic persons, but is usually neglected in medical reports. The aim of the present paper is to assess the prevalence of alcoholism among men in different occupations and classes within as well as outside of the labor force. The data were taken from a Swedish general population study, the now twice-resurveyed Lundby 1947 cohort (N = 952). Information was collected through field interviews conducted independently of the administrative recording, but was checked afterwards against documentary records. Occupation, class and employment were independent variables; alcoholism was a dependent variable. It was found that alcoholism was most prevalent among workers (11.1%), among small scale entrepreneurs (13.7%) and among groups outside of the labor force (13.9%), particularly the subgroup early retired and unemployed (29.6%). The findings suggest a relation to current crisis tendencies in the Swedish "welfare"society.
PubMed ID
7431134 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of Norwegian 18-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122878
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aida Mulic
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. aida.mulic@odont.uio.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):475-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Social Class
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to study prevalence, distribution and severity of erosive wear in a group of 18-year-olds.
A total of 1456 adolescents were screened for erosive wear as part of their regular visit at the Public Dental Health Service (PDHS) clinics in Oslo. Of 554 (38%) registered with erosive wear, 267 accepted a second examination to record lesion distribution and severity, performed by one previously calibrated clinician. A tested erosive wear system (VEDE) was used. Occlusal surfaces of the first and second molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index surfaces.
Of the 267 individuals with erosive wear, 13.5% were without lesions, 54.3% had erosive wear in enamel only, whereas 32.2% had at least one lesion extending into dentine. The upper central incisors (46%) and first lower molars (44%) were the most affected teeth with the highest presence on the palatal surfaces. Cuppings were registered in 62% of the individuals, usually in addition to erosive lesions on other surfaces. Eighty-five per cent of the cuppings were on first molars and 34% on the mesio-buccal cusp. Males had significantly more lesions into dentine compared with females (p = 0.03). There was a significant association between presence of erosive lesions and DMFT (p
PubMed ID
22762481 View in PubMed
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Choice of measure matters: A study of the relationship between socioeconomic status and psychosocial resources in a middle-aged normal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286510
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0178929
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Karin Festin
Kristin Thomas
Joakim Ekberg
Margareta Kristenson
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0178929
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Psychosocial resources may serve as an important link to explain socioeconomic differences in health. Earlier studies have demonstrated that education, income and occupational status cannot be used interchangeably as indicators of a hypothetical latent social dimension. In the same manner, it is important to disentangle the effect of measuring different constructs of psychosocial resources. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse if associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and psychosocial resources differ depending on the measures used. A cross-sectional population-based study of a random sample (n = 1007) of middle-aged individuals (45-69 years old, 50% women) in Sweden was performed using questionnaire and register data. SES was measured as education, occupation, household income and self-rated economy. Psychosocial resources were measured as social integration, social support, mastery, self-esteem, sense of coherence (SOC) and trust. Logistic regression models were applied to analyse the relationships controlling for the effects of possible confounders. The measures of SES were low or moderately correlated to each other as were the measures of psychosocial resources. After controlling for age, sex, country of birth and employment status, household income and self-rated economy were associated with all six psychosocial resources; occupation was associated with three (social integration, self-esteem and trust) and education with two (social integration and self-esteem). Social integration and self-esteem showed a significant and graded relationship with all SES measures; trust was associated with all SES measures except education, whereas SOC and mastery were only associated with household income and self-rated economy. After controlling for other SES measures, no associations with psychosocial resources remained for education or occupation. In conclusion, associations between SES and psychosocial resources did differ depending on the measures used. The findings illustrate the importance of the choice of measure when investigating SES as well as psychosocial resources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28832585 View in PubMed
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[Social classification. II. Stalastoga's subdivision according to social status rank and the social grouping employed by the Institute for Social Research].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246069
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Feb 18;142(8):544-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1980

Inequality and mortality: long-run evidence from a panel of countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80734
Source
J Health Econ. 2007 Jan;26(1):1-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Leigh Andrew
Jencks Christopher
Author Affiliation
Social Policy Evaluation, Analysis and Research Centre, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, Australia. andrew.leigh@anu.edu.au
Source
J Health Econ. 2007 Jan;26(1):1-24
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developed Countries
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mortality - trends
Social Class
Abstract
We investigate whether changes in economic inequality affect mortality in rich countries. To answer this question we use a new source of data on income inequality: tax data on the share of pretax income going to the richest 10% of the population in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the US between 1903 and 2003. Although this measure is not a good proxy for inequality within the bottom half of the income distribution, it is a good proxy for changes in the top half of the distribution and for the Gini coefficient. In the absence of country and year fixed effects, the income share of the top decile is negatively related to life expectancy and positively related to infant mortality. However, in our preferred fixed-effects specification these relationships are weak, statistically insignificant, and likely to change their sign. Nor do our data suggest that changes in the income share of the richest 10% affect homicide or suicide rates.
PubMed ID
16963138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Menarcheal age in Stockholm girls, 1967.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42163
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1976 Nov;3(6):587-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1976
Author
M. Furu
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1976 Nov;3(6):587-90
Date
Nov-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Humans
Menarche
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Using the status quo method on 917 girls aged 10-17 years in 1967, mean age at menarche was computed to be 13-09 +/- 0-08 years (SD 1-10). There was no difference in mean age at menarche between girls from different social groups defined by father's or mother's occupation. The menstrual periods evoked severe discomfort in 9 per cent of the individuals. These were on an average significantly younger at menarche than the other girls. The percentage of the girls feeling discomfort during the menstrual periods as well as its intensity increased with time since menarche.
PubMed ID
999234 View in PubMed
Less detail

2736 records – page 1 of 274.