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518 records – page 1 of 52.

2020 healthcare management in Canada: a new model home next door.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184152
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
D Wayne Taylor
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Date
2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Sharing
Efficiency
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Reform
Health Expenditures - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Models, organizational
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration - trends
Politics
Population Dynamics
Social Change
Social Values
Taxes - trends
Abstract
The Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada asked whether Medicare is sustainable in its present form. Well, Medicare is not sustainable for at least six reasons. Given a long list of factors, such as Canada's changing dependency ratio, the phenomenon of diminishing returns from increased taxation, competing provincial expenditure needs, low labour and technological productivity in government-funded healthcare, the expectations held by baby boomers, and the evolving value sets of Canadians--Medicare will impoverish Canada within the next couple of decades if not seriously recast. As distasteful as parallel private-pay, private-choice healthcare may be to some policy makers and providers who grew up in the 1960s, the reality of the 2020s will dictate its necessity as a pragmatic solution to a systemic problem.
PubMed ID
12908160 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and family structure in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31283
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Dawn Griesbach
Amanda Amos
Candace Currie
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit (CAHRU), Department of PE, Sport and Leisure Studies, University of Edinburgh, St. Leonard's Land, Holyrood Road, EH8 8AQ, Edinburgh, UK. dawn.griesbach@isd.csa.scot.nhs.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Austria - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Family - ethnology
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Income
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Smoking - ethnology
Social Change
Social Class
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between family structure and smoking among 15-year-old adolescents in seven European countries. It also investigates the association between family structure and a number of known smoking risk factors including family socio-economic status, the adolescent's disposable income, parental smoking and the presence of other smokers in the adolescent's home. Findings are based on 1998 survey data from a cross-national study of health behaviours among children and adolescents. Family structure was found to be significantly associated with smoking among 15-year-olds in all countries, with smoking prevalence lowest among adolescents in intact families and highest among adolescents in stepfamilies. Multivariate analysis showed that several risk factors were associated with higher smoking prevalences in all countries, but that even after these other factors were taken into account, there was an increased likelihood of smoking among adolescents in stepfamilies. Further research is needed to determine the possible reasons for this association.
PubMed ID
12435550 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of oral health and influencing factors: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52248
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Anna-Lena Ostberg
Kristina Jarkman
Ulf Lindblad
Arne Halling
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Services and Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden. anna-lena.ostberg@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):167-73
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Care
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews
Life Style
Male
Motivation
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Social Change
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Accounts of self-perceptions of oral health have hitherto been rare, although they are of great interest for strategies in health promotion. The objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of adolescents' perceptions of oral health and influencing factors. Semi-structured interviews of 17 Swedish adolescents were performed. Criteria for strategic sampling were age (15, 18 years), gender (male, female), and dental health (healthy, unhealthy). Data were analyzed according to the constant comparative method. Areas of focus were general oral health, personal oral health, dental care, and life-style issues. Oral health awareness was generally low among the informants. Two categories of oral health were identified: action (the physical things we do to effect the condition of our mouths) and condition (the physical status of the mouth). Conditional aspects were most frequent in evaluations of personal oral health. The informants considered their possibilities to influence oral health limited. Perceptions of influences on oral health were related to personal and professional care, social support and impact, and external factors. 'Concern for oral health' was derived as the core category in perceived influence on oral health. The study indicates that it is important to find factors that enhance adolescents' awareness of their own resources and to seek mechanisms that govern internalization. There is a need to find strategies to convey such knowledge to the intermediaries: dental personnel and parents.
PubMed ID
12166911 View in PubMed
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Advocacy oral history: a research methodology for social activism in nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207189
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
A R Rafael
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feminism
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Nursing Research - methods
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Public health nursing
Reproducibility of Results
Social Change
Social Justice
Abstract
The reinstatement of social activism as a central feature of nursing practice has been advocated by nursing scholars and is consistent with contemporary conceptualizations of primary health care and health promotion that are rooted in critical social theory's concept of empowerment. Advocacy oral history from a feminist postmodern perspective offers a method of research that has the potential and purpose to empower participants to transform their political and social realities and may, therefore, be considered social activism. A recent study of public health nurses who had experienced significant distress through the reduction and redirection of their practice is provided as an exemplar of advocacy oral history. Philosophies underpinning the research method and characteristics of feminist postmodern research are reviewed and implications for the use of this methodology for social activism in nursing are drawn.
PubMed ID
9398937 View in PubMed
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518 records – page 1 of 52.