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A 10-week randomized trial comparing eccentric vs. concentric hamstring strength training in well-trained soccer players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49656
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Roald Mjølsnes
Arni Arnason
Tor Østhagen
Truls Raastad
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Humans
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscles - physiology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soccer
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of a 10-week training program with two different exercises -- traditional hamstring curl (HC) and Nordic hamstrings (NH), a partner exercise focusing the eccentric phase -- on muscle strength among male soccer players. METHODS: Subjects were 21 well-trained players who were randomized to NH training (n = 11) or HC training (n = 10). The programs were similar, with a gradual increase in the number of repetitions from two sets of six reps to three sets of eight to 12 reps over 4 weeks, and then increasing load during the final 6 weeks of training. Strength was measured as maximal torque on a Cybex dynamometer before and after the training period. RESULTS: In the NH group, there was an 11% increase in eccentric hamstring torque measured at 60 degrees s(-1), as well as a 7% increase in isometric hamstring strength at 90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. Since there was no effect on concentric quadriceps strength, there was a significant increase in the hamstrings:quadriceps ratio from 0.89 +/- 0.12 to 0.98 +/- 0.17 (11%) in the NH group. No changes were observed in the HC group. CONCLUSION: NH training for 10 weeks more effectively develops maximal eccentric hamstring strength in well-trained soccer players than a comparable program based on traditional HC.
PubMed ID
15387805 View in PubMed
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2018 FIFA World Cup: isolating Russia could harm global health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261158
Source
Lancet. 2015 Feb 28;385(9970):749-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2015
Author
Sven Daniel Wolfe
Source
Lancet. 2015 Feb 28;385(9970):749-50
Date
Feb-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Global health
Humans
International Cooperation
Politics
Public Health
Russia
Soccer
PubMed ID
25752158 View in PubMed
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Acceleration and sprint profiles of a professional elite football team in match play.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267270
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jørgen Ingebrigtsen
Terje Dalen
Geir Håvard Hjelde
Barry Drust
Ulrik Wisløff
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acceleration
Athletic Performance
Football
Humans
Movement
Norway
Physical Exertion
Running
Soccer
Walking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterise the acceleration and sprint profiles of elite football match play in one Norwegian elite football team (Rosenborg FC). Fifteen professional players in five playing positions took part in the study (n = 101 observations). Player movement was recorded during every domestic home game of one full season (n = 15) by an automatic tracking system based on microwave technology. Each player performed 91 ± 21 accelerations per match, with a lower number in the second compared with the first half (47 ± 12 vs. 44 ± 12). Players in lateral positions accelerated more often compared to players in central positions (98.3 ± 20.5 vs. 85.3 ± 19.5, p
PubMed ID
25005777 View in PubMed
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Activity profile and physiological response to football training for untrained males and females, elderly and youngsters: influence of the number of players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100640
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
M B Randers
L. Nybo
J. Petersen
J J Nielsen
L. Christiansen
M. Bendiksen
J. Brito
J. Bangsbo
P. Krustrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. pkrustrup@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Soccer - physiology
Time and Motion Studies
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the activity profile, heart rate and metabolic response of small-sided football games for untrained males (UM, n=26) and females (UF, n=21) and investigated the influence of the number of players (UM: 1v1, 3v3, 7v7; UF: 2v2, 4v4 and 7v7). Moreover, heart rate response to small-sided games was studied for children aged 9 and 12 years (C9+C12, n=75), as well as homeless (HM, n=15), middle-aged (MM, n=9) and elderly (EM, n=11) men. During 7v7, muscle glycogen decreased more for UM than UF (28 +/- 6 vs 11 +/- 5%; P90% of HR(max) ranged from 147 +/- 4 (EM) to 162 +/- 2 (UM) b.p.m. and 10.8 +/- 1.5 (UF) to 47.8 +/- 5.8% (EM). Time >90% of HR(max) (UM: 16-17%; UF: 8-13%) and time spent with high speed running (4.1-5.1%) was similar for training with 2-14 players, but more high-intensity runs were performed with few players (UM 1v1: 140 +/- 17; UM 7v7: 97 +/- 5; P
PubMed ID
20149143 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class association football referees in relation to performance in selected physical tests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163966
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Javier Mallo
Enrique Navarro
José-María García-Aranda
Bart Gilis
Werner Helsen
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte--INEF--Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fatigue
Finland
Humans
Locomotion - physiology
Male
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness
Soccer
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The aims of the present study were (1) to analyse the physical demands of top-class referees and (2) to compare their official FIFA fitness test results with physical performance during a match. The work rate profiles of 11 international referees were assessed during 12 competitive matches at the 2003 FIFA Under-17 World Cup and then analysed using a bi-dimensional photogrammetric video analysis system based on direct lineal transformation (DLT) algorithms. In the first 15 min of matches, the referees were more active, performing more high-intensity exercise (P
PubMed ID
17454548 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class female soccer refereeing in relation to the position of the ball.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153667
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
J. Mallo
S. Veiga
C. López de Subijana
E. Navarro
Author Affiliation
Sports Biomechanics Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science, Politechnical University of Madrid, Spain. javier.mallo@upm.es
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Analysis of Variance
Athletic Performance - physiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Running - physiology
Russia
Soccer - physiology
Video Recording
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the activity profile of top-class female soccer referees during competition and to relate it to the position of the ball. Ten matches from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) under-20 female World Championships held in Russia in 2006 were filmed and the kinematical parameters of the female referees (n=10) and the ball were determined using a two-dimensional photogrammetric video system based on direct linear transformation (DLT) algorithms. Total distance covered during a match was 10 km, of which 1.3 km represented high-intensity activities (>13 km/h). The referees' highest mobility was achieved in the initial 15 min of the match, covering greater distance and performing more intense exercise (P
PubMed ID
19084474 View in PubMed
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[Acute athletic injuries. I. A 1-year material from a casualty department]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40313
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Nov 29;144(48):3603-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-1982

Acute hamstring injuries in Danish elite football: a 12-month prospective registration study among 374 players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148168
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Aug;20(4):588-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
J. Petersen
K. Thorborg
M B Nielsen
P. Hölmich
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Amager Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jesper.petersen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Aug;20(4):588-92
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes
Denmark
Humans
Leg Injuries
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - injuries
Prospective Studies
Soccer - injuries
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine the incidence rates of acute hamstring injuries in Danish elite football sustained during training or match play. Furthermore, it was our intention to document details about the recurrence, severity and the injury seasonal distribution. Hamstring injuries among 374 elite football players were registered prospectively during a 12-month period. A total of 46 first-time and eight recurrent hamstring injuries were registered. The incidence rates for incurring a first-time hamstring injury showed a significantly (P28 days from injury to injury free). Each team sustained a mean of 3.4 hamstring injuries per season, with a mean of 21.5 days missed per injury (range 3-136; median 16 days per injury). The seasonal distribution showed an accumulation of injuries in the first 2 months after a 3.5-month mid-season winter break.
PubMed ID
19804575 View in PubMed
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Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213683
Source
BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-1995
Author
U M Kujala
S. Taimela
I. Antti-Poika
S. Orava
R. Tuominen
P. Myllynen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-8
Date
Dec-2-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arm Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Basketball - injuries
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Martial Arts - injuries
Soccer - injuries
Abstract
To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports.
Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data.
Finland during 1987-91.
621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate.
Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors.
54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability.
Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8520333 View in PubMed
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Acute soccer injuries in Finland in 1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239085
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1985 Mar;19(1):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
J. Sandelin
S. Santavirta
O. Kiviluoto
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1985 Mar;19(1):30-3
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Athletic Injuries - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dislocations - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Soccer
Sports
Abstract
The present investigation analyses all the acute soccer injuries recorded in Finland during one year (1980). The mean follow-up time was 18 months. The calculated yearly injury incidence was 5.8%. No significant difference in the injury incidences between the two sexes could be detected. A major part, 64% of the injuries were located in the lower extremities. Fractures and dislocations accounted for 11% of all injuries. One quarter of the injuries were classified as mild, causing a playing disability shorter than a week. Most injuries occurred through physical contact with another player (p less than 0.001). The calculated median time of absence from practice after injury was 4 weeks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3995226 View in PubMed
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230 records – page 1 of 23.