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Accidental falls related to shovelling snow from rooftops: analysis of injuries in an extraordinary epidemic in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259244
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M. Aulanko
L. Handolin
T. Söderlund
J. Pajarinen
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(4):271-4
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Snow
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Abstract
Exceptional amount of snow led to snow removal attempts from the rooftops resulting in a relative unique and extraordinary epidemic of accidental falls in winter of 2010.
The injury pattern, hospital care, surgical operations, and the total costs of the primary hospital stay of accidentally fallen patients treated in Helsinki University Hospital trauma unit were analyzed.
Forty-six patients were admitted to hospital during the study period of three months. Majority of the patients were males (N?=?43, 93%) with the average age of 52.9 years. Seven patients were admitted to ICU. The average length of primary hospital stay was 4.7 days with 0% mortality. Total amount of fractures was 65 (63%) of all 97 injuries. The most common injuries were fractures of upper and lower extremity, and spinal column.
Preventing similar unnecessary epidemics of accidental falls in the future it is important to have professional opinion of the need of snow removal along with understanding of the risk of injury. Wearing appropriate safety equipments, and use professional help when necessary is advisable.
PubMed ID
23238503 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban snowpack.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232700
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1988 Aug 1;74:133-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1988
Author
A. Boom
J. Marsalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Water pollution Control, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1988 Aug 1;74:133-48
Date
Aug-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Ontario
Polycyclic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Risk factors
Snow
Urban Population
Weather
Abstract
Accumulations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a snowpack were studied in an industrial urban area with numerous anthropogenic sources of PAHs. Average PAH loadings stored in the snowpack were determined, plotted on a map of the study area, and arenal distribution approximated by isoloading contours. The loading contours exhibited a marked elongation in the direction of prevailing winds. The unit-area deposition rates observed in the study area exceeded the typical rates reported for other urban areas, and were the highest immediately downwind of a steel plant. PAH levels in snowmelt were well below the freshwater aquatic life toxicity criteria, but exceeded both the WHO drinking water standard and the U.S. EPA carcinogenic criteria at the 10(-5) risk level.
PubMed ID
3222690 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction after manual or automated snow removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53923
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2001 Jun 1;87(11):1282-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
B A Franklin
P. George
R. Henry
S. Gordon
G C Timmis
W W O'Neill
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology (Cardiac Rehabilitation), William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. bfranklin@beaumont.edu
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2001 Jun 1;87(11):1282-3
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exertion
Humans
Male
Michigan - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Snow
PubMed ID
11377355 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute myocardial infarction after snow removal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175912
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(2):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Aerodynamic drag is not the major determinant of performance during giant slalom skiing at the elite level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119255
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M. Supej
L. Saetran
L. Oggiano
G. Ettema
N. Ĺ arabon
B. Nemec
H-C Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Performance - physiology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Friction
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Skiing - physiology
Snow
Sweden
Time Factors
Wind
Young Adult
Abstract
This investigation was designed to (a) develop an individualized mechanical model for measuring aerodynamic drag (F(d) ) while ski racing through multiple gates, (b) estimate energy dissipation (E(d) ) caused by F(d) and compare this to the total energy loss (E(t) ), and (c) investigate the relative contribution of E(d) /E(t) to performance during giant slalom skiing (GS). Nine elite skiers were monitored in different positions and with different wind velocities in a wind tunnel, as well as during GS and straight downhill skiing employing a Global Navigation Satellite System. On the basis of the wind tunnel measurements, a linear regression model of drag coefficient multiplied by cross-sectional area as a function of shoulder height was established for each skier (r > 0.94, all P
PubMed ID
23121340 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244607
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
G J Johnson
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Corneal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Humidity
Ice
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Snow
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Wind
Abstract
To determine the aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea (Labrador keratopathy), total population surveys were conducted in 5 communities in coastal Labrador and northern Newfoundland. For 4 years records were also kept on all clinic patients aged 40 or more throughout the region. Both methods gave a peak prevalence at latitudes 55 degrees--56 degrees north. The greatest severity and earliest age of onset occurred around the same latitudes. Of the proposed environmental causative agents only ultraviolet radiation, reflected from ice and snow, explains the distribution of the disease. The high cumulative UV dosage is due to the unique geographical and climatic features of the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7236572 View in PubMed
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Airborne biogenic particles in the snow of the cities of the Russian Far East as potential allergic compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262711
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kirill S Golokhvast
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Far East
Humans
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Russia
Snow
Abstract
This paper presents an analysis of airborne biogenic particles (1 mkm-1 mm) found in the snow in several cities of the Russian Far East during 2010-2013. The most common was vegetational terraneous detritus (fragments of tree and grass leaves) followed by animal hair, small insects and their fragments, microorganisms of aeroplankton, and equivocal biological garbage. Specific components were found in samples from locations close to bodies of water such as fragments of algae and mollusc shells and, marine invertebrates (needles of sea urchins and shell debris of arthropods). In most locations across the Far East (Vladivostok, Khabarovsk, Blagoveshchensk, and Ussuriysk), the content of biogenic particles collected in the winter did not exceed 10% of the total particulate matter, with the exception of Birobidzhan and the nature reserve Bastak, where it made up to 20%. Most of all biogenic compounds should be allergic: hair, fragments of tree and grass leaves, insects, and microorganisms.
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1995 Oct;75(4):325-307583847
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1995 Oct;96(4):449-567560654
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Cites: Trop Biomed. 2005 Dec;22(2):171-716883284
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Aug;118(2):521-216890781
Cites: J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2007;17(1):39-4717323862
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Cites: Respir Care. 2008 May;53(5):602-15; discussion 616-718426614
Cites: Environ Health. 2008;7:2818538018
Cites: Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2012 Jan;18(1):29-3422081090
Cites: Clin Dev Immunol. 2012;2012:56376022272212
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Jan 15;443:559-6523220389
Cites: Arh Hig Rada Toksikol. 2013;64(1):115-2223705203
Cites: Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2003 Aug;23(3):469-8114524386
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001 Jan;107(1):48-5411149990
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Cites: Adv Exp Med Biol. 1996;409:225-309095246
PubMed ID
25140327 View in PubMed
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Among unknown Eskimo; an account of twelve years intimate relations with the primitive Eskimo of ice-bound Baffin Land, with a description of their ways of living, hunting customs & beliefs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286
Source
Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA. 280 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1923
Author
Bilby, J.W.
Source
Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA. 280 pp.
Date
1923
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Stature
Population
Violence
Frostbite
Drowning
Cannibalism
Tattoos
Elderly, care of
STD
Infanticide
Senilicide
Blindness
Snow blindness
Taboos
Personal hygiene
Childbirth
Shaman
Labor
Fertility
Shamanic healing
Traditional healing
Starvation
Animal attack
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 417.
UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection E99.E7 B55 1923
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Analysis of precipitation-related motor vehicle collision and injury risk using insurance and police record information for Winnipeg, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129552
Source
J Safety Res. 2011 Oct;42(5):383-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Brian N Mills
Jean Andrey
Derrick Hambly
Author Affiliation
Adaptation and Impacts Research Section, Environment Canada, c/o Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Safety Res. 2011 Oct;42(5):383-90
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - economics - statistics & numerical data
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Automobiles - economics - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Insurance, Accident - economics - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba - epidemiology
Police - statistics & numerical data
Rain
Risk
Risk Assessment - methods
Snow
Visual Perception - physiology
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
Police records are the most common source of data used to estimate motor-vehicle collision risks, understand causal or contributing factors, and evaluate the efficacy of interventions. The literature notes concerns about this information citing discrepancies between police reports and other sources of injury occurrence and severity data. The primary objective of the analysis was to assess the adequacy of police reports for an examination of weather-related injury collision risk.
Analyses of relative risk were carried out using both police records and comprehensive insurance claim data for Winnipeg, Canada over the period 1999-2001.
Both data sets yielded very similar results-precipitation substantially increases the risk of injury collision (police records: RR 1.76, CI 1.55-2.00; insurance: RR 1.80, CI 1.62-1.99) and risk of injury (police records, RR 1.74, CI 1.55-1.96; insurance, RR 1.69, CI 1.55-1.85) relative to corresponding dry weather control periods. Both rainfall and snowfall were associated with large increases in collisions and injuries.
While relative risks are almost identical, over 64% more injury collisions and 74% more injuries were identified using the insurance data, which is an important difference for evaluating absolute risk and exposure.
PubMed ID
22093573 View in PubMed
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And then there was snow in Alaska: a sharing of experience with Allan Wicker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230079
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 1989 Oct;17(5):571-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
R B Bechtel
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 1989 Oct;17(5):571-4
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude
Behavior
Ecology
Humans
Research Design - methods
Snow
Weather
Abstract
A perennial problem with theorizing is the improper context which experiments and correlational studies assume without understanding first the environmental levels of correspondence at which variables operate in nature. Ecological studies show variables can operate within separate contexts in such a way as to cancel the influence if too large or too small a context is chosen. One must first determine the proper level of correspondence before investigating the causal relationship. An example of the variable of snow in Alaska is explored and different levels of correspondence cited in attitude studies and economics. Only when levels of correspondence are understood does the true causal relationship permit measurement and interpretation.
Notes
Comment On: Am J Community Psychol. 1989 Oct;17(5):531-472627017
PubMed ID
2627022 View in PubMed
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271 records – page 1 of 28.