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The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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Analysis of cigarette smoking habits of cancer patients referred to the Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183537
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Rajiv S Samant
Tara L Tucker
Author Affiliation
Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Road,Ottawa, ON, Canada. rajiv.samant@orcc.on.ca
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(3):157-60
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cancer Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To review cigarette smoking among patients referred to the Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NEORCC).
Database analysis of the smoking history information for patients referred to the NEORCC from 1991-1999 was performed.
Data was available for 15,850 patients and 72.7% reported being either current or previous smokers. Approximately 24.5% of patients were still smoking and 7.8% had quit within the last year. Smoking rates and total consumption were highest among those patients with cancers arising in the lung, bladder, esophagus and head & neck regions. The percentage of patients reporting a history of smoking remained consistently high over the time period studied.
Cigarette smoking rates are high among NEORCC patients and strategies to improve the situation are required.
PubMed ID
14512263 View in PubMed
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An assessment of US and Canadian smoking reduction objectives for the year 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204593
Source
Am J Public Health. 1998 Sep;88(9):1362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
C. Pechmann
P. Dixon
N. Layne
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Management, University of California, Irvine 92697, USA. cpechman@uci.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 1998 Sep;88(9):1362-7
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Goals
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Probability
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology - trends
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Stochastic Processes
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This study assessed whether US and Canadian smoking reduction objectives for the year 2000 are attainable. The United States seeks to cut smoking in its population to 15%; the Canadian goal is 24%.
Smoking data were obtained for the United States (1974-1994) and Canada (1970-1995) for the overall populations and several age-sex subpopulations. Analyses estimated trends, future prevalences, and the likelihood of goal attainment. Structural time-series models were used because of their ability to fit a variety of trends.
The findings indicate that smoking has been declining steadily since the 1970s, by approximately 0.7 percentage points a year, in both countries. Extrapolating these trends to the year 2000, the US prevalence will be 21% and the Canadian prevalence 24%.
If the current trends continue, the Canadian goal seems attainable, but the US goal does not. The US goal is reachable only for 65-to 80-year-olds, who already have low smoking prevalences. It appears that both countries must increase their commitment to population-based tobacco control.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jan 6;261(1):49-552908994
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jan 6;261(1):61-52908996
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1992 Nov-Dec;83(6):404-61286438
Cites: Prev Med. 1990 Sep;19(5):552-612235922
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 1992 Mar;76(2):289-3031548962
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Nov 1;143(9):905-62224718
PubMed ID
9736877 View in PubMed
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An examination of the relationship between municipal smoke-free bylaw strength and the odds of being a former smoker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176394
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah M Viehbeck
Paul W McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1. smviehbe@ahsmail.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):42-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Constitution and Bylaws
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Policy
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between municipal no-smoking bylaw strength and the odds of being a former smoker.
Data from Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 1.1, 2001) and a validated bylaw scoring scheme (2001) were linked and analyzed to determine whether the odds of being a former smoker were related to the strength of no-smoking bylaws in municipalities that had been matched for potentially confounding factors. The sample consisted of ever smokers (current and former smokers) from Ontario municipalities that did not have a no-smoking bylaw, or had a fully implemented no-smoking bylaw before September 2000. Data were analyzed using a Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square test and a logistic regression.
The results from the Mantel-Haenszel (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.80-1.12) and logistic regression analyses (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.82-1.11) did not find support for the hypothesis that living in a municipality with a strong no-smoking bylaw would increase the odds of being a former smoker.
Findings were inconsistent with previous studies that have found no-smoking restrictions in homes, workplaces and public places increase the odds that smokers attempt and succeed in quitting smoking. However, results from this study must be interpreted with caution because of the cross-sectional design and limited control of potentially important covariates.
PubMed ID
15682693 View in PubMed
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Association Between Distance From Home to Tobacco Outlet and Smoking Cessation and Relapse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282305
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Anna Pulakka
Jaana I Halonen
Ichiro Kawachi
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Markus Jokela
Ilkka Kaate
Markku Koskenvuo
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Commerce
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Products
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Reduced availability of tobacco outlets is hypothesized to reduce smoking, but longitudinal evidence on this issue is scarce.
To examine whether changes in distance from home to tobacco outlet are associated with changes in smoking behaviors.
The data from 2 prospective cohort studies included geocoded residential addresses, addresses of tobacco outlets, and responses to smoking surveys in 2008 and 2012 (the Finnish Public Sector [FPS] study, n?=?53?755) or 2003 and 2012 (the Health and Social Support [HeSSup] study, n?=?11?924). All participants were smokers or ex-smokers at baseline. We used logistic regression in between-individual analyses and conditional logistic regression in case-crossover design analyses to examine change in walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet as a predictor of quitting smoking in smokers and smoking relapse in ex-smokers. Study-specific estimates were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis.
Walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet.
Quitting smoking and smoking relapse as indicated by self-reported current and previous smoking at baseline and follow-up.
Overall, 20?729 men and women (age range 18-75 years) were recruited. Of the 6259 and 2090 baseline current smokers, 1744 (28%) and 818 (39%) quit, and of the 8959 and 3421 baseline ex-smokers, 617 (7%) and 205 (6%) relapsed in the FPS and HeSSup studies, respectively. Among the baseline smokers, a 500-m increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet was associated with a 16% increase in odds of quitting smoking in the between-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.28) and 57% increase in within-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.32-1.86), after adjusting for changes in self-reported marital and working status, substantial worsening of financial situation, illness in the family, and own health status. Increase in distance to the nearest tobacco outlet was not associated with smoking relapse among the ex-smokers.
These data suggest that increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet may increase quitting among smokers. No effect of change in distance on relapse in ex-smokers was observed.
PubMed ID
27533777 View in PubMed
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Association between smoking cessation and short-term health-care use: results from an international prospective cohort study (ATTEMPT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112813
Source
Addiction. 2013 Nov;108(11):1979-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Emma Beard
Lion Shahab
Susan J Curry
Robert West
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
Source
Addiction. 2013 Nov;108(11):1979-88
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
France - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Spain - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have found that smoking cessation is associated with a short-term increase in health-care use. This may be because 'sicker' smokers are more likely to stop smoking. The current study assessed the association between smoking cessation and health-care use, adjusting for pre-cessation physical and mental health conditions.
Data came from the ATTEMPT cohort, a multi-national prospective survey of smokers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France and Spain, that lasted 18 months (with follow-ups every 3 months).
A total of 3645 smokers completed the baseline questionnaire. All participants smoked at least five cigarettes per day, intended to quit smoking within the next 3 months and were between 35 and 65 years of age.
Participants were asked questions about their socio-demographic and smoking characteristics, as well previous smoking-related morbidities. Participants were also asked to report their health-care use in the previous 3 months i.e. emergency room (ER) visits, hospitalization, whether hospitalization required surgery, and health-care appointments.
A total of 8252, 4779 and 1954 baseline episodes of smoking were available for 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Of these, 2.8% (n = 230), 0.9% (n = 40) and 0.7% (n = 14) were followed by 3, 6 and 12 months of abstinence. No significant differences were found among 3, 6 or 12 months of abstinence and ER visits, hospitalization and whether hospitalization required surgery or health-care visits. However, 6-month smoking cessation episodes were associated with higher odds of reporting an appointment with a dietician.
Smoking cessation does not appear to be associated with a substantial short-term increase or decrease in health-care use after adjusting for pre-cessation morbidities.
PubMed ID
23795578 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and behaviours in smoking cessation among general practitioners in Finland 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171284
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):355-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Noël C Barengo
H Patrick Sandström
Vesa J Jormanainen
Markku T Myllykangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland. noel.barengo@uku.fi
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):355-60
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
World Health Organization
Abstract
To investigate whether smoking by general practitioners (GPs) and gender influence smoking cessation advice.
A self-administered questionnaire, originally developed by the WHO and modified according to the Finnish health care system was sent by mail to physicians who were members of the Finnish Medical Association (FMA). Participants were restricted to those who were living in Finland and were younger than 65 years. Numbers of participants was 3,057 and the response rate 69%.
Smoking male GPs gave less smoking cessation advice only to patients with a stomach ulcer or patients using oral contraceptive pills compared with their non-smoking colleagues. Male GPs gave less smoking cessation advice to pregnant patients or patients using contraceptive pills than female GPs. Female smoking GPs less likely advised patients who were pregnant or who were using oral contraceptive pills to stop smoking than non-smoking female GPs (p
PubMed ID
16398097 View in PubMed
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Can young adult smoking status be predicted from concern about body weight and self-reported BMI among adolescents? Results from a ten-year cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154106
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Sep;10(9):1449-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
John J Koval
Linda L Pederson
Xiaohe Zhang
Paul Mowery
Mary McKenna
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. jkoval@biostats.uwo.ca
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Sep;10(9):1449-55
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Peer Group
Self Concept
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Young Adult
Abstract
We sought to evaluate the relationship between the perception of being overweight and BMI (body mass index) when participants were adolescents and their cigarette smoking as young adults. In 1993, 1598 students in grade 6 from 107 schools in Scarborough (Ontario) completed the base line questionnaire. Of these, 1,543, 1,455 and 1,254 responded at follow-ups in grades 8 and 11, and as young adults (in 2002), respectively. Reported smoking behavior was used to categorize people as current and never smokers. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Girls who thought themselves overweight in grades 8 and 11 were more likely to be smoking as young adults (odds ratios of 1.778 and 1.627, respectively). Boys with higher self-reported BMIs in grades 8 and 11 were more likely to be smokers as young adults (odds ratios of 1.115 and 1.095, respectively). These findings provide evidence of the longitudinal effect of perception of being overweight as an adolescent on smoking as a young adult and suggest possible ways of averting smoking behavior.
PubMed ID
19023836 View in PubMed
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Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67356
Source
Stroke. 2002 Sep;33(9):2263-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Søren Bak
Søren Hein Sindrup
Torben Alslev
Ole Kristensen
Kaare Christensen
David Gaist
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark. sbak@health.sdu.dk
Source
Stroke. 2002 Sep;33(9):2263-9
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular accident - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cessation of smoking is widely recommended in patients with stroke to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke, but little is known regarding how patients modify their smoking habits after a stroke. We used data from a prospective follow-up study to assess modification of smoking habits and to identify predictors of persistent smoking after first-ever stroke. METHODS: All patients admitted to the only neurology department of Funen County (465 000 inhabitants) with first-ever stroke from August 1, 1999, to January 31, 2001, were prospectively identified. A comprehensive structured interview was completed both during hospitalization and at 6-month follow-up. The interview comprised questions on education, occupation, marital status, lifestyle, concomitant diseases, and functional disability. We estimated the relative risk of persistent smoking at follow-up using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 734 patients with a first-ever stroke in the study period. One hundred three patients (14%) died in the 6-month period after their admission. A total of 511 patients (81%) who participated in the interview both on admission and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7%) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7%) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more efficient antismoking counseling is required to reduce the proportion of persistent smokers after stroke. This counseling should take into account the increased risk of persistent smoking in men, patients with no disability, blue-collar workers, and patients living alone.
PubMed ID
12215597 View in PubMed
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132 records – page 1 of 14.