Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1059 records – page 1 of 106.

A 2-year self-help smoking cessation manual intervention among middle-aged Finnish men: an application of the transtheoretical model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217852
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
U E Pallonen
L. Leskinen
J O Prochaska
C J Willey
R. Kääriäinen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Research Center, University of Rhode Island, Kingston 02881.
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manuals as Topic
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Self Care
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
A 2-year self-help manual smoking cessation intervention was conducted among a panel of middle-aged Finnish men (n = 265) who were recruited proactively in a longitudinal cardiovascular risk factor surveillance study.
Intervention utilized the stages of change concept of the transtheoretical model. The stages were assessed in the treatment condition at baseline of the cessation study and after that by mail every sixth month. Assessments were followed by an immediate mailing of a stage-based self-help manual matching the stage of change at that time. A usual care group was assessed annually but received no treatment.
A significant time x intervention effect (P
PubMed ID
7971879 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
Less detail

[28-year follow up of smoking habits of Swedish physicians. Reduced number of smokers but increased number of snuff-users]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67649
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Nov 27;93(48):4437-40, 4443-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1996

The 2005 British Columbia smoking cessation mass media campaign and short-term changes in smokers attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158616
Source
J Health Commun. 2008 Mar;13(2):125-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2008 Mar;13(2):125-48
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Female
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Program Development
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Risk-Taking
Smoking
Smoking Cessation - methods
Social Marketing
Time Factors
Abstract
The effect of the 2005 British Columbia (BC) smoking cessation mass media campaign on a panel (N = 1,341) of 20-30-year-old smokers' attitudes is evaluated. The 5-week campaign consisted of posters, television, and radio ads about the health benefits of cessation. Small impacts on the panel's attitudes toward the adverse impacts of smoking were found, with greater impacts found for those who had no plans to quit smoking at the initial interview. As smokers with no plans to quit increasingly recognized the adverse impacts of smoking, they also increasingly agreed that they use smoking as a coping mechanism. Smokers with plans to quit at the initial interview already were well aware of smoking's adverse impacts. Respondents recalling the campaign poster, which presented a healthy alternative to smoking, decreased their perception of smoking as a coping mechanism and devalued their attachment to smoking. Evidence was found that media ad recall mediates unobserved predictors of attitudes toward smoking.
PubMed ID
18300065 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Feb;8(2):388-41021556193
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:327-4721219157
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2000 Aug;23(4):334-4010940958
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2001 May;11(3):291-211339074
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Apr;26(2):120-412054329
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Oct;26(5):426-3112413286
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S101-1714668090
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Jan-Feb;95(1):45-914768741
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1997 Dec;21(7):789-919489201
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1998 Oct;22(6):648-529848957
Cites: Br Med J. 1950 Sep 30;2(4682):739-4814772469
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):329-3615415260
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):336-815415261
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 May 15;184(10):529-3016719758
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):888-90116585055
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Apr;31(2):174-617461010
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2008;29:325-5018173388
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2008 Apr;32(2):110-618412679
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(11):2378-8918313186
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1708-1618938006
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;38(2):470-719047078
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2010 Feb;33(1):77-8420014004
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2010;6:2620831827
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011 Feb;35(1):47-5321299700
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:10222533609
PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal users of Canadian quitlines: an exploratory analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160066
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Lynda M Hayward
H Sharon Campbell
Carol Sutherland-Brown
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S Hallman Institute, Room 1717A, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1. lhayward@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Counseling - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hotlines - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Patient satisfaction
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To conduct an exploratory, comparative study of the utilisation and effectiveness of tobacco cessation quitlines among aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian smokers.
Population based quitlines that provide free cessation information, advice and counselling to Canadian smokers.
First time quitline callers, age 18 years of age and over, who called the quitline between August 2001 and December 2005 and who completed the evaluation and provided data on their ethnic status (n = 7082).
Demographic characteristics and tobacco behaviours of participants at intake and follow-up; reasons for calling; actions taken toward quitting, and 6-month follow-up quit rates.
7% of evaluation participants in the time period reported aboriginal origins. Aboriginal participants were younger than non-aboriginals but had similar smoking status and level of addiction at intake. Concern about future health and current health problems were the most common reasons aboriginal participants called. Six months after intake aboriginals and non-aboriginals had taken similar actions with 57% making a 24-hour quit attempt. Quit rates were higher for aboriginals than non-aboriginals, particularly for men. The 6-month prolonged abstinence rate for aboriginal men was 16.7% compared with 7.2% for aboriginal women and 9.4% and 8.3% for non-aboriginal men and women, respectively.
This exploratory analysis showed that even without targeted promotion, aboriginal smokers do call Canadian quitlines, primarily for health related reasons. We also showed that the quitlines are effective at helping them to quit. As a population focused intervention, quitlines can reach a large proportion of smokers in a cost efficient manner. In aboriginal communities where smoking rates exceed 50% and multiple health risks and chronic diseases already exist, eliminating non-ceremonial tobacco use must be a priority. Our results, although exploratory, suggest quitlines can be an effective addition to aboriginal tobacco cessation strategies.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Oct 3;347(14):1087-9312362011
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Feb;5(1):13-2512745503
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Sep;86(9):1119-271932883
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i3-818048627
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Sep;89(9):1322-710474547
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2005 Nov 11;54(44):1121-416280969
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i16-2018048624
Cites: Health Rep. 1992;4(1):7-241391655
PubMed ID
18048634 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of the smoking cessation intervention in a large population-based study: the Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67180
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Charlotta Pisinger
Jørgen Vestbo
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Troels Thomsen
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Nordre Ringvej, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. chpi@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Potential exists for improving the impact of quit-smoking programmes, by recruiting smokers in early motivational stages, by using active recruitment strategies, and by offering professional assistance to quit. METHODS: This was a randomized population-based intervention study, in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 2,408 daily smokers in all motivational stages were included. All participants completed a questionnaire, and underwent a health examination and a lifestyle consultation. Smokers in the high-intensity intervention were offered assistance to quit smoking in smoking cessation groups. RESULTS: Before the lifestyle consultation only 11% of the smokers stated that they planned to quit within one month. After the lifestyle consultation 27% accepted smoking cessation in groups and an additional 12% planned to quit without assistance. Of the smokers who accepted smoking cessation groups 23% had not been planning to quit before the lifestyle consultation. Being a woman, having high tobacco consumption, having a long smoking history, having tried to quit within the previous year, and having a higher motivation to quit predicted participation in smoking cessation groups. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to recruit a large number of smokers in early motivational stages by using active recruitment strategies and by offering assistance to quit. Lifestyle consultations markedly increased the number of smokers willing to try to quit. Smokers preferred assistance to quit in a smoking cessation group to quitting on their own; therefore, it is important to improve recruitment strategies for smoking cessation programmes.
PubMed ID
15823975 View in PubMed
Less detail

1059 records – page 1 of 106.