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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Adolescent smoking: effect of school and community characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139245
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Chris Y Lovato
Cornelia Zeisser
H Sharon Campbell
Allison W Watts
Peter Halpin
Mary Thompson
John Eyles
Edward Adlaf
K Stephen Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. chris.lovato@ubc.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Organizational Policy
Residence Characteristics
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A substantial challenge in addressing adolescent tobacco use is that smoking behaviors occur in complex environments that involve the school setting and larger community context.
This study provides an integrated description of factors from the school and community environment that affect youth smoking and explains variation in individual smoking behaviors both within and across schools/communities.
Data were collected from 82 randomly sampled secondary schools in five Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, and Labrador) during the 2003-2004 school year. Cross-sectional data were obtained from students; school administrators (school-based tobacco control policies and programs); and from observations in the community. In 2009, hierarchic logistic regression was used to model the role of individual, school, and community variables in predicting student smoking outcomes.
Students who attended a school with a focus on tobacco prevention (OR=0.87, 95% CI=0.81, 0.94) and stronger policies prohibiting tobacco use (OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.88, 0.97) were less likely to smoke than students who attended a school without these characteristics. A student was more likely to smoke if a greater number of students smoked on the school periphery (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.07, 1.47). Within the community, price per cigarette (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.84, 0.99) and immigrants (OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.98, 0.99) were inversely related to students' smoking status.
The results suggest that school and community characteristics account for variation in smoking levels across schools. Based on the current findings, the ideal school setting that supports low student smoking levels is located in a neighborhood where the cost of cigarettes is high, provides tobacco prevention education, and has a policy prohibiting smoking.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):609-1021084083
PubMed ID
21084070 View in PubMed
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Adolescent's perceptions and expectations of parental action on children's smoking and snus use; national cross sectional data from three decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89775
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nilsson Maria
Weinehall Lars
Bergström Erik
Stenlund Hans
Janlert Urban
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden. maria.nilsson@epiph.umu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:74
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Parenting
Parents
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Parents play a vital role as children develop tobacco behaviours. Many parents feel unsure about their possibility to influence their teenager's lifestyle. Knowledge about young people's acceptance for parental intervention could increase parental involvement. The overall objective of this study was to explore adolescents' perceptions and expectations of parental action regarding children's smoking and snus use, and whether they have changed over time. To see if there were differences whether the adolescent was a tobacco user or not the adolescents' tobacco use was followed; and described to put the findings on their perceptions and expectations of parental action in a context. METHODS: The study used a repeated cross-sectional design, reporting Swedish national data from three decades. Data were collected in 1987, 1994 and 2003 by a questionnaire mailed to homes, in total to 13500 persons. The annual samples, which were random and national representative, consisted of 4500 young people aged 13, 15 and 17 yr, 1500 individuals per age group. The sampling and data collection procedures were done the same way during each survey. Chi2- tests were used to evaluate differences in distributions. RESULTS: Adolescents in all age groups became more positive toward parental action over time. In 2003, more then 86% of the adolescents, including both smokers and non-smokers, strongly supported parental action on their children's smoking by trying to persuade them not to smoke (94%), by not smoking themselves (87%) and by not allowing their children to smoke at home (86%). Both non-smokers and smokers supported the idea of parental action in a similar way. Reduced pocket money had a weak support (42%), especially from girls. Eighty-nine percent of the adolescents expected their parents to act against smoking and 85% against snus use.Smoking was stable at 8% in 1987 and 1994 but decreased to 4% in 2003. In 1987 the snus use prevalence was 4% and in 2003 it was 3%. Snus users were mostly boys while few girls had done more than tried snus. More young people in all age groups had never tried smoking compared to the previous studies. In 2003 57% stated that they had never tried smoking. CONCLUSION: Adolescent smoking in Sweden has decreased and the proportion who never tried smoking has increased. The results of this study show that a growing majority of adolescents support strong parental intervention to help them refrain from tobacco, but preferably not in a punitive manner. This finding dismisses the notion that adolescents ignore or even disdain parental practices concerning tobacco. Prevention strategies and interventions addressing adolescent tobacco use that involve parents can be improved by using these findings to encourage parents to intervene against their children's tobacco use.
PubMed ID
19261172 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the smoking prevention and cessation needs of Canadian student nurses & registered nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226546
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1991 Apr;2(1):22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
M B Harrison
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1991 Apr;2(1):22
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Smoking is still a problem, particularly among diploma student nurses. Strategies aimed at prevention and cessation need to be developed with emphasis on the motivation to quit rather than new cessation techniques. School curricula should address not only knowledge, but also attitudes and skills required to assist in the tobacco reduction effort.
PubMed ID
2069691 View in PubMed
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Association between willingness to use snus to quit smoking and perception of relative risk between snus and cigarettes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126184
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Oct;14(10):1221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Karl Erik Lund
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, P.O. Box 565 Sentrum, 0105 Oslo, Norway. kel@sirus.no
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Oct;14(10):1221-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Perception
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use Cessation Products - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Tobacco, Smokeless
Young Adult
Abstract
Smokers are often incorrect in their assessment of the relative risk of snus and cigarettes. We have studied how perception of risks of snus compared with cigarettes was associated with the willingness of trying snus as a quit-smoking method.
Fourteen thousand seven hundred and forty-four Norwegian men aged 20-50 years were selected at random from a national representative web panel and sent a questionnaire by e-mail. Of the 7,170 (48.6%) who responded, there were 1,155 former daily smokers who reported method for quitting smoking and 1,213 current daily smokers who stated their willingness to try different methods for quitting smoking. They were also asked to assess the relative risk between daily use of snus and cigarettes.
Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for reporting willingness to try snus in future quit attempts was significantly higher (AOR = 4.82, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22416114 View in PubMed
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Cessation and relapse in a year-long workplace quit-smoking contest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67915
Source
Prev Med. 1990 Jul;19(4):414-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
R P Sloan
L. Dimberg
L A Welkowitz
M A Kristiansen
Author Affiliation
Behavioral Medicine Program, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, New York 10032.
Source
Prev Med. 1990 Jul;19(4):414-23
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Occupational Health Services - methods - organization & administration - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In an attempt to increase the impact of smoking cessation activities, some recent studies have examined the use of contests and competitions. The study reported here evaluates a year-long multiple-lottery quit-smoking contest at Volvo Flygmotor, the Volvo aircraft engine manufacturing company in Trollhattan, Sweden. Lotteries were held at 1, 6, and 12 months after the contest began. By quitting for at least 1 month, enrollees were eligible to win cash prizes. Maintaining nonsmoking status from a previous lottery automatically qualified enrollees for the next one. Smoking status was established by self-report, expired carbon monoxide, and saliva cotinine. Seventy-three employees, representing approximately 10% of the company's smokers, entered the contest during the initial 2-week enrollment period. Point prevalence 1-month and 6-month cessation rates were 64.4 and 49.3%, respectively. Continuous abstinence 6-month and 1-year rates were 45.2 and 32.8% respectively. Psychological, home, work and smoking history variables generally were not related to cessation or relapse.
PubMed ID
2399223 View in PubMed
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Changing social norms: a mass media campaign for youth ages 12-18.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152235
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eileen Schmidt
Susan Mide Kiss
Wendi Lokanc-Diluzio
Author Affiliation
Health Protection, Fraser Health.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):41-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alberta
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Mental Recall
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Conformity
Social Control Policies
Social Marketing
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Urban health
Abstract
To create a mass media campaign that endeavours to a) denormalize tobacco use among youth aged 12-18, b) empower youth to stay tobacco product free, and c) increase awareness of the dangers of tobacco use, while using positive messaging.
Target age group was youth between the ages of 12 and 18 years.
The mass media campaign was developed, implemented, and evaluated within the city of Calgary.
The mass media campaign consisted of posters for schools and other venues frequented by youth (e.g., community centres, libraries, fitness centres, restaurants, movie theatres), posters for transit (e.g., bus shelters, LRT shelters, back of bus) print advertisements, television/radio public service announcements, an interactive community website for youth, a media launch event, promotional items, and organizational efforts to cross-promote the campaign. The creative concept was based on intercept interviews, focus group testing, and other research conducted by the campaign's creative team and youth volunteers in order to identify the key elements of this campaign.
A total of 149 students completed both a baseline and follow-up survey to evaluate the marketing activities of the campaign. A total of 27 youth participated in prototype testing to compare this positive-messaging campaign with negative-toned tobacco reduction campaigns. Six stakeholders/partners participated in stakeholder interviews to assess their thoughts and learnings regarding the campaign process.
The evaluation respondents viewed the campaign positively and showed strong recall of the messaging.
PubMed ID
19263982 View in PubMed
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Community smoking cessation contests: an effective public health strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218753
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;85(2):95-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
C E Leinweber
J M Macdonald
H S Campbell
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Program, Alberta Cancer Board, Calgary.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;85(2):95-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Competitive Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Abstract
This report describes the follow-up of a community-sponsored smoking cessation contest. The aims of the evaluation were to describe the characteristics of contestants and the quit rates at six weeks, six months and one year. The "Quit to Win" contest was held as part of a larger cancer prevention program in Medicine Hat, Alberta. In order to be eligible for prizes, contestants were required to be smoke-free for six weeks and have their smoking status verified by a "Buddy". Contestants were contacted by telephone at the end of the contest and again at six months and one year. Seventy-five individuals entered the contest. The quit rates, 56%, 27% and 21% at six weeks, six months and one year respectively, compare favourably with other smoking cessation interventions. This study demonstrates that a community-based program can reach a variety of smokers with a relatively simple intervention.
PubMed ID
8012926 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.