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[A government survey and program of the medical society: tobacco policy in the 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67907
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 26;87(39):3041-2, 3047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1990

An examination of the relationship between municipal smoke-free bylaw strength and the odds of being a former smoker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176394
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah M Viehbeck
Paul W McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1. smviehbe@ahsmail.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):42-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Constitution and Bylaws
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Policy
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between municipal no-smoking bylaw strength and the odds of being a former smoker.
Data from Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 1.1, 2001) and a validated bylaw scoring scheme (2001) were linked and analyzed to determine whether the odds of being a former smoker were related to the strength of no-smoking bylaws in municipalities that had been matched for potentially confounding factors. The sample consisted of ever smokers (current and former smokers) from Ontario municipalities that did not have a no-smoking bylaw, or had a fully implemented no-smoking bylaw before September 2000. Data were analyzed using a Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square test and a logistic regression.
The results from the Mantel-Haenszel (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.80-1.12) and logistic regression analyses (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.82-1.11) did not find support for the hypothesis that living in a municipality with a strong no-smoking bylaw would increase the odds of being a former smoker.
Findings were inconsistent with previous studies that have found no-smoking restrictions in homes, workplaces and public places increase the odds that smokers attempt and succeed in quitting smoking. However, results from this study must be interpreted with caution because of the cross-sectional design and limited control of potentially important covariates.
PubMed ID
15682693 View in PubMed
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Association between tobacco vendor non-compliance with youth access and point of sale restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146713
Source
Tob Control. 2010 Apr;19(2):171
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010

Canadian campus smoking policies: investigating the gap between intent and outcome from a student perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137167
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2011;59(4):260-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lynne Baillie
Doris Callaghan
Michelle L Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Prevention, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. lbaillie@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2011;59(4):260-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Organizational Policy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Perception
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - psychology
Students - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Tape Recording
Universities - legislation & jurisprudence
Young Adult
Abstract
Young adults remain the earliest legal target for the tobacco industry. Against this, the existence of smoking policies would appear to offer some protection to students on campus. However, little research has been conducted into the outcomes of such policies from a student perspective.
The authors conducted 8 focus groups at 4 selected Canadian undergraduate campuses to investigate student perceptions and behaviors resulting from campus smoking policies.
Results indicated that student smoking behaviors are minimally impacted by campus smoking policies due to seriously compromised implementation and enforcement.
These findings imply that the presence of campus smoking policies and claims of "smoke-free" campuses should not be misinterpreted as achievement and without renewed focus and adequate tobacco control infrastructure, it will remain possible for young adults to initiate and maintain tobacco smoking on campus.
PubMed ID
21308585 View in PubMed
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Cannabis use in Canada: the need for a 'public health' approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147893
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):101-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Jürgen Rehm
Wayne Hall
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addictions (CARMHA), Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada. bfischer@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):101-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Public Health
Public Health Practice
Public Policy
Street Drugs - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug in Canada, used by 1 in 7 adults and 1 in 4 students. Other forms of drug use (e.g., alcohol or injection drug use) are increasingly approached within a public health policy framework that focuses on reducing harms rather than use per se. Cannabis, by contrast, remains formally controlled by a criminal justice approach that focuses on enforcing abstinence. Its use is associated with a variety of possible acute or chronic health problems that include cognitive and respiratory impairment, psychotic episodes, dependence and injury risk. The incidence of these outcomes, however, is predicted by early onset and a high frequency and length of use that only apply to a minority of users. In a public health framework, cannabis use - especially in young populations - should be systematically monitored and high-risk patterns of use screened for in appropriate settings, e.g., schools and GP offices. Evidence-based primary and secondary prevention, treatment and enforcement need to be targeted at these high-risk patterns of use. Given the large cannabis user population, especially among young people, and the failure of the criminalization approach to discourage use, a public health framework for cannabis use is urgently needed in Canada.
PubMed ID
19839283 View in PubMed
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Changes in retail tobacco promotions in a cohort of stores before, during, and after a tobacco product display ban.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132020
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Oct;101(10):1879-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Joanna E Cohen
Lynn Planinac
Anne Lavack
Daniel Robinson
Shawn O'Connor
Joanne DiNardo
Author Affiliation
Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, University ofToronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jocohen@jhsph.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Oct;101(10):1879-81
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Humans
Marketing - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco
Abstract
We used a longitudinal design to investigate the impact of a government policy banning the display of tobacco products at the point of sale. The extent of tobacco promotions in 481 randomly selected stores was documented at 4 points in time (2005-2009). Tobacco promotions were greatly reduced after implementation of the display ban. A ban on the display of tobacco products and other signage and promotions at retail is a critical tobacco-control policy to reduce people's exposure to tobacco marketing.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Dec;94(12):2081-315569957
Cites: Prev Med. 2005 Jan;40(1):16-2215530576
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):265-7017896733
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):5-6; author reply 6-718048773
Cites: Addiction. 2008 Feb;103(2):322-818042190
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 May-Jun;99(3):166-7118615934
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Aug;10(8):1347-5418686182
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009 May;20(2):489-50619395844
Cites: Tob Control. 2009 Jun;18(3):218-2119264731
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):109-1219839285
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Aug;126(2):232-820643725
Cites: Tob Control. 2011 Mar;20(2):137-4321088060
Cites: Prev Med. 2000 Apr;30(4):320-710731461
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Jun;10(2):184-811387542
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 May;22(4):228-3311988378
Cites: Tob Control. 2002 Sep;11(3):191-412198267
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):511-59480360
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 May;161(5):440-517485618
PubMed ID
21852644 View in PubMed
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Changes in smoking among restaurant and bar employees following Norway's comprehensive smoking ban.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93831
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Mar;23(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Braverman Marc T
Aarø Leif Edvard
Hetland Jørn
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, Oregon State University, 161 Milam Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. marc.braverman@oregonstate.edu
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Mar;23(1):5-15
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Restaurants - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Norway implemented a nationwide ban on indoor smoking in June 2004. This study documents the smoking patterns of Norway's restaurant and bar workers before and after the ban, to determine changes in smoking prevalence and explore which individual and environmental characteristics were related to cessation. A national sample of food service workers was surveyed by telephone or Internet immediately before the ban and at 4 and 11 months post-implementation. Results showed that between baseline measurement and 4 months post-implementation, there were significant declines in prevalence of daily smoking (-3.6% points, p
PubMed ID
18089625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Compliance for Kids: a community-based tobacco prevention project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218757
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;85(2):82-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T J Abernathy
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;85(2):82-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alberta - epidemiology
Commerce
Consumer Participation
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Patient compliance
Plants, Toxic
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Tobacco
Abstract
This article reports on the findings of a pre-test/post-test evaluation of the Compliance for Kids program carried out in three different communities. It demonstrates that it is indeed possible for a locally directed program to influence community standards of behaviour. It also suggests that in larger areas, such programs might better be implemented at the neighbourhood than at the city-wide level; and that merchants are influenced more by threat of enforcement than knowledge of laws. Such findings reinforce the need both for continued community programming and comprehensive legislation and enforcement.
PubMed ID
8012922 View in PubMed
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The control of environmental tobacco smoke: a policy review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89029
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Feb;6(2):741-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
McNabola Aonghus
Gill Laurence William
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Ireland. amcnabol@tcd.ie
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Feb;6(2):741-58
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants
Environmental Exposure
Health Policy
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco
World Health Organization
Abstract
According to World Health Organisation figures, 30% of all cancer deaths, 20% of all coronary heart diseases and strokes and 80% of all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are caused by cigarette smoking. Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) exposure has also been shown to be associated with disease and premature death in non-smokers. In response to this environmental health issue, several countries have brought about a smoking ban policy in public places and in the workplace. Countries such as the U.S., France, Italy, Ireland, Malta, the Netherlands, Sweden, Scotland, Spain, and England have all introduced policies aimed at reducing the population exposure to ETS. Several investigations have monitored the effectiveness of these smoking ban policies in terms of ETS concentrations, human health and smoking prevalence, while others have also investigated a number of alternatives to smoking ban policy measures. This paper reviews the state of the art in research, carried out in the field of ETS, smoking bans and Tobacco Control to date and highlights the need for future research in the area.
PubMed ID
19440413 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.