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Alcohol, smoking, and drug use among Inuit women of childbearing age during pregnancy and the risk to children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136911
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1081-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Gina Muckle
Dominique Laflamme
Jocelyne Gagnon
Olivier Boucher
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Research Center, Quebec City, QC, Canada. gina.muckle@psy.ulaval.ca
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1081-91
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - ethnology
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - ethnology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - ethnology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol consumption during pregnancy, a known teratogen often associated with drug use and smoking is a well-known public health concern.
This study provides prevalence data for alcohol, smoking, and illicit drug use before, during, and after pregnancy among Inuit. Factors associated with alcohol use are also identified.
Two hundred and eight Inuit women from Arctic Quebec were interviewed at mid-pregnancy, and at 1 and 11 months postpartum to provide descriptive data on smoking, alcohol, and drug use during pregnancy, and the year before and after pregnancy. Sociodemographic and family characteristics potentially associated with alcohol use were documented.
Ninety-two percent of the women reported smoking and 61% reported drinking during pregnancy. Episodes of binging during pregnancy were reported by 62% of the alcohol users, which correspond to 38% of pregnant women. Thirty-six percent of the participants reported using marijuana during pregnancy. Alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy were more likely to be reported by women who lived in less crowded houses, had a better knowledge of a second language, drank alcohol more often and in larger amounts prior to pregnancy, and used illicit drugs. Binge drinkers were more likely to be single women and to have had fewer previous pregnancies. Postpartum distress and violence were more likely to be experienced by women who used alcohol during pregnancy. Binge drinking during pregnancy was best predicted by drinking habits before pregnancy, maternal symptoms of depression, the use of illicit drugs during pregnancy, and the number of young children living with the mother.
These results confirm that alcohol is a major risk factor to maternal and child health in this population, underscoring the need for culturally relevant and effective prevention programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21332531 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure among the Inuit (Eskimo) populations in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3453
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Peter Bjerregaard
Eric Dewailly
T Kue Young
Carole Blanchet
Robert A Hegele
Sven E O Ebbesson
Patricia M Risica
Gert Mulvad
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Svanemollevej 25, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. p.bjerregaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):92-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - ethnology - physiopathology
Inuits - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
World Health
Abstract
AIMS: Studies of blood pressure among various Inuit (Eskimo) populations in the Arctic have given inconsistent results. Most studies reported lower blood pressure among the Inuit as compared with the predominantly white national populations. This has been attributed to traditional subsistence practices and lifestyle. This study compared the blood pressure among the major Inuit population groups with other populations and examined the associations with factors like age, gender, obesity and smoking. METHODS: The study comprised four Inuit populations from Alaska, Canada, and Greenland with participation rates ranging from 51% to 73%. In a cross-sectional design, 2,509 randomly selected adults from 31 villages were examined. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, smoking, and medication were recorded. RESULTS: Mean systolic blood pressures ranged from 116 to 124 mm Hg among men and 110 to 118 among women in the four populations. Mean diastolic blood pressures ranged from 75 to 78 mm Hg among men and from 71 to 73 among women. Systolic blood pressure increased with age. Male gender, obesity, being a non-smoker, and being on anti-hypertensive treatment were associated with high systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, and anti-hypertensive treatment, blood pressure differed among the populations (p
PubMed ID
12745758 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular burden and related risk factors among Nunavik (Quebec) Inuit: insights from baseline findings in the circumpolar Inuit health in transition cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96676
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Jun;26(6):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat
Eric Dewailly
Rabia Louchini
Emilie Counil
Martin Noël
Annie Ferland
Michel Lucas
Béatriz Valera
Jean-Marie Ekoé
Robert Ladouceur
S. Déry
Grace Egeland
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Jun;26(6):190-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Transition
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Life Style
Male
Obesity - complications - ethnology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Inuit are commonly portrayed to be somehow protected from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through their traditional lifestyle and diet. However, actual sociocultural transition and related major, modifiable risk factors have scarcely been quantified in the Inuit population. Such knowledge is extremely valuable in terms of public health intervention.METHODS: A total of 887 Inuit residents from Nunavik, Quebec, participated in a cohort study. The estimates presented were derived from anthropometric and biological measurements gathered at the time of recruitment and enhanced by information collected in the medical file of each participant. All estimates were corrected for a complex sampling strategy and bootstrapped to ensure the representativeness of the general Nunavik population.RESULTS: Overall, 19% of Inuit had a disease of the circulatory system according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision. Among all disorders, peripheral circulatory system disease was the most prevalent (9%). Prevalences of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were of similar magnitude (2.5%). No significant difference in disease prevalence was noted between sexes. The major modifiable CVD risk factors were smoking (84%), obesity (49%) (body mass index of greater than 30 kgm2) and elevated blood pressure (13085 mmHg or greater) (18%). Prevalences were globally higher among women.CONCLUSION: The current belief that the Inuit are protected from CVD is seriously questioned by the results of the present study. Considering the extremely high prevalence of CVD risk factors, a population-based intervention reinforced for women is urgently needed to reduce their risk.
PubMed ID
20548980 View in PubMed
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Exposure of the Inuit population of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec) to lead and mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3471
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Dewailly
P. Ayotte
S. Bruneau
G. Lebel
P. Levallois
J P Weber
Author Affiliation
Unité de Recherche en Santé Publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Ducks
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Geese
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lead - blood
Lead Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Mercury Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seafood - analysis
Seals, Earless
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Whales
Abstract
The authors conducted a survey during 1992 to evaluate blood levels of lead and mercury in Inuit adults of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec, Canada). Blood samples obtained from 492 participants (209 males and 283 females; mean age = 35 yr) were analyzed for lead and total mercury; mean (geometric) concentrations were 0.42 micromol/l (range = 0.04-2.28 micromol/l) and 79.6 nmol/l (range = 4-560 nmol/l), respectively. Concentrations of omega-3 fatty acid in plasma phospholipids--a biomarker of marine food consumption--were correlated with mercury (r = .56, p
PubMed ID
11572279 View in PubMed
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Exposure to nicotine and carcinogens among Southwestern Alaskan Native cigarette smokers and smokeless tobacco users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125353
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Jun;21(6):934-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Neal L Benowitz
Caroline C Renner
Anne P Lanier
Rachel F Tyndale
Dorothy K Hatsukami
Bruce Lindgren
Irina Stepanov
Clifford H Watson
Connie S Sosnoff
Peyton Jacob
Author Affiliation
University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. NBenowitz@MedSFGH.ucsf.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Jun;21(6):934-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Carcinogens - metabolism
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Nicotine - metabolism
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology - metabolism
Tobacco
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects - metabolism
Abstract
The prevalence of tobacco use, both cigarette smoking and smokeless, including iqmik (homemade smokeless tobacco prepared with dried tobacco leaves mixed with alkaline ash), and of tobacco-related cancer is high in Alaskan Native people (AN). To investigate possible mechanisms of increased cancer risk we studied levels of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA) in tobacco products and biomarkers of tobacco toxicant exposure in Southwestern AN people.
Participants included 163 cigarette smokers, 76 commercial smokeless tobacco, 20 iqmik, 31 dual cigarette smokers and smokeless tobacco, and 110 nontobacco users. Tobacco use history, samples of tobacco products used, and blood and urine samples were collected.
Nicotine concentrations were highest in cigarette tobacco and TSNAs highest in commercial smokeless tobacco products. The AN participants smoked on average 7.8 cigarettes per day. Nicotine exposure, assessed by several biomarker measures, was highest in iqmik users, and similar in smokeless tobacco and cigarette smokers. TSNA exposure was highest in smokeless tobacco users, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure was highest in cigarette smokers.
Despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day, AN cigarette smokers had similar daily intake of nicotine compared to the general U.S. population. Nicotine exposure was greatest from iqmik, likely related to its high pH due to preparation with ash, suggesting high addiction potential compared to other smokeless tobacco products. TSNA exposure was much higher with smokeless tobacco than other product use, possibly contributing to the high rates of oral cancer.
Our data contribute to an understanding of the high addiction risk of iqmik use and of the cancer-causing potential of various forms of tobacco use among AN people.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22490317 View in PubMed
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The impact of smoking on adherence to treatment for latent tuberculosis infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170263
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mélanie Lavigne
Isabelle Rocher
Colin Steensma
Paul Brassard
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada. mel_lavigne@hotmail.com
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:66
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa, Northern - epidemiology
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
India - epidemiology
Isoniazid - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - prevention & control
Abstract
Studies have shown an association between smoking and tuberculosis (TB) infection, disease and TB-related mortality. We hypothesized that smokers with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are less likely to comply with their LTBI treatment regimen, thus increasing their risk of developing active disease. We thus documented the impact of smoking on adherence to LTBI treatment.
Between 1998 and 2000, a convenience sample of patients undergoing treatment for LTBI completed a questionnaire on smoking status. Level of adherence to LTBI treatment was tested for associations with socio-demographic profile, and smoking status
320 patients were recruited, and 302 (94%) completed the questionnaire. Smoking prevalence was 21%. 72% of patients were adherent to LTBI treatment. Women (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.2-3.3) and non-smokers (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.0-3.3) were associated with adherence to LTBI treatment. Only gender was found as an independent predictor of adherence after adjusting for age and smoking status (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.06-3.3).
Males and smokers need to have extra supervision to ensure compliance with LTBI treatment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16536868 View in PubMed
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Maternal smokeless tobacco use in Alaska Native women and singleton infant birth size.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131472
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jan;91(1):93-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Lucinda J England
Shin Y Kim
Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza
Hoyt G Wilson
Juliette S Kendrick
Glen A Satten
Claire A Lewis
Persenia Whittern
Myra J Tucker
William M Callaghan
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30030, USA. lbe9@cdc.gov
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jan;91(1):93-103
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Height - drug effects
Cephalometry
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
To examine the effects of maternal prenatal smokeless tobacco use on infant birth size.
A retrospective medical record review of 502 randomly selected deliveries.
Singleton deliveries to Alaska Native women residing in a defined geographical region in western Alaska, 1997-2005.
A regional medical center's electronic records were used to identify singleton deliveries. Data on maternal tobacco exposure and pregnancy outcomes were abstracted from medical records. Logistic models were used to estimate adjusted mean birthweight, length and head circumference for deliveries to women who used no tobacco (n=121), used smokeless tobacco (n=237) or smoked cigarettes (n=59). Differences in mean birthweight, length and head circumference, 95% confidence intervals and p-values were calculated using non-users as the reference group.
Infant birthweight, crown-heel length and head circumference.
After adjustment for gestational age and other potential confounders, the mean birthweight of infants of smokeless tobacco users was reduced by 78 g compared with that of infants of non-users (p=0.18) and by 331 g in infants of smokers (p
PubMed ID
21902677 View in PubMed
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Mitochondrial DNA mutations in respiratory complex-I in never-smoker lung cancer patients contribute to lung cancer progression and associated with EGFR gene mutation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132313
Source
J Cell Physiol. 2012 Jun;227(6):2451-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Santanu Dasgupta
Ethan Soudry
Nitai Mukhopadhyay
Chunbo Shao
John Yee
Stephan Lam
Wan Lam
Wei Zhang
Adi F Gazdar
Paul B Fisher
David Sidransky
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. sdasgupta@vcu.edu
Source
J Cell Physiol. 2012 Jun;227(6):2451-60
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Movement
Cell Proliferation
Chi-Square Distribution
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA, Mitochondrial
Disease Progression
Electron Transport Complex I - genetics - metabolism
Exons
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Linear Models
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Mutation
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Phenotype
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - genetics
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor - genetics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Superoxides - metabolism
Transfection
ras Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were reported in different cancers. However, the nature and role of mtDNA mutation in never-smoker lung cancer patients including patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and KRAS gene mutation are unknown. In the present study, we sequenced entire mitochondrial genome (16.5?kb) in matched normal and tumors obtained from 30 never-smoker and 30 current-smoker lung cancer patients, and determined the mtDNA content. All the patients' samples were sequenced for KRAS (exon 2) and EGFR (exon 19 and 21) gene mutation. The impact of forced overexpression of a respiratory complex-I gene mutation was evaluated in a lung cancer cell line. We observed significantly higher (P?=?0.006) mtDNA mutation in the never-smokers compared to the current-smoker lung cancer patients. MtDNA mutation was significantly higher (P?=?0.026) in the never-smoker Asian compared to the current-smoker Caucasian patients' population. MtDNA mutation was significantly (P?=?0.007) associated with EGFR gene mutation in the never-smoker patients. We also observed a significant increase (P?=?0.037) in mtDNA content among the never-smoker lung cancer patients. The majority of the coding mtDNA mutations targeted respiratory complex-I and forced overexpression of one of these mutations resulted in increased in vitro proliferation, invasion, and superoxide production in lung cancer cells. We observed a higher prevalence and new relationship between mtDNA alterations among never-smoker lung cancer patients and EGFR gene mutation. Moreover, a representative mutation produced strong growth effects after forced overexpression in lung cancer cells. Signature mtDNA mutations provide a basis to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for never-smoker lung cancer patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21830212 View in PubMed
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Racial/ethnic disparities in coronary heart disease risk factors among WISEWOMAN enrollees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3097
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):503-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Eric A Finkelstein
Olga A Khavjou
Lee R Mobley
Dawn M Haney
Julie C Will
Author Affiliation
RTI International, Health, Social and Economics Research, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. finkelse@rti.org
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):503-18
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Indicators
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypertension - complications - ethnology
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Medically Uninsured - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - complications - ethnology
Prevalence
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We used the baseline data collected for the Well-integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) participants to provide a snapshot of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on enrollment and to address racial/ethnic disparities in the following CVD risk factors: body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total cholesterol, diabetes and smoking prevalence, 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, and treatment and awareness of high cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. METHODS: We used linear regression analysis to (1) assess the presence of racial/ethnic disparities and test whether existing disparities can be explained by (2) differences in individual characteristics or by (3) differences in individual and community characteristics. RESULTS: Our results reveal a high degree of CVD risk among the WISEWOMAN participants and statistically significant racial/ethnic disparities in risk factors. Black participants were at the greatest risk of CVD, and Hispanic and Alaska Native participants were healthier in terms of CVD risk than white participants. Some racial/ethnic disparities were explained by differences in individual and community characteristics, but other disparities persisted even after controlling for these factors. CONCLUSIONS: Because differences in community characteristics explain many of the racial/ethnic disparities in CVD risk factors, eliminating disparities may require community-wide interventions. Successful WISEWOMAN projects are likely to not only reduce CVD risk factors overall but also to lessen racial/ethnic disparities in these risk factors.
PubMed ID
15257843 View in PubMed
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Taking a life course perspective on cardiovascular disease and diabetes in First Nations peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154575
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Sep;40(3):58-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Andrew Kmetic
Jeffrey Reading
Elizabeth Estey
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Human and Social Development, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. akmetic@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Sep;40(3):58-78
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Breast Feeding - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Child
Cost of Illness
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Food Habits - ethnology
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Hypertension - complications - ethnology
Indians, North American - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Obesity - complications - ethnology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Abstract
The burden of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and associated risk factors, such as obesity, smoking, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, and dietary factors, present a mix of factors that are detrimental to the immediate and long-term health of First Nations peoples in Canada. The authors use a life course perspective to examine the long-term effects of risk factors that are prevalent during gestation, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, and adult life on developmental health and later disease risk. The resultant broader perspective may generate innovative approaches to addressing chronic disease in Canada's Aboriginal population.
PubMed ID
18947092 View in PubMed
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