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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and behaviours in smoking cessation among general practitioners in Finland 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171284
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):355-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Noël C Barengo
H Patrick Sandström
Vesa J Jormanainen
Markku T Myllykangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland. noel.barengo@uku.fi
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):355-60
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
World Health Organization
Abstract
To investigate whether smoking by general practitioners (GPs) and gender influence smoking cessation advice.
A self-administered questionnaire, originally developed by the WHO and modified according to the Finnish health care system was sent by mail to physicians who were members of the Finnish Medical Association (FMA). Participants were restricted to those who were living in Finland and were younger than 65 years. Numbers of participants was 3,057 and the response rate 69%.
Smoking male GPs gave less smoking cessation advice only to patients with a stomach ulcer or patients using oral contraceptive pills compared with their non-smoking colleagues. Male GPs gave less smoking cessation advice to pregnant patients or patients using contraceptive pills than female GPs. Female smoking GPs less likely advised patients who were pregnant or who were using oral contraceptive pills to stop smoking than non-smoking female GPs (p
PubMed ID
16398097 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280830
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2016;12:219-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Morten Krogh Christiansen
Jesper Møller Jensen
Anders Krogh Brøndberg
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Kjærulf Jensen
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2016;12:219-27
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Lipase - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Overweight - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prevalence
Registries
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Secondary Prevention - methods
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients.
We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology.
The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets.
Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27307744 View in PubMed
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Change in smoking habits after having been screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103005
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Aug;48(2):138-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
S. Bohlin
C. Fröjd
A. Wanhainen
M. Björck
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Aug;48(2):138-43
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Counseling
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Mass Screening
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study smoking habits among men with abdominal aortic aneurysm at screening at 65 years of age, and during follow-up, as a base-line study to evaluate future interventions.
Nested case-control study.
Between 2006 and 2011, 8150 65-year-old men (compliance 85%) were screened for AAA in Uppsala County, Sweden. Among 292 men with an aortic diameter of at least 25 mm, 77 were active smokers at the time of screening. At follow-up of smoking habits in 2012, 53 men (69%) participated in this study, 28 had an AAA of at least 30 mm and 25 a sub-aneurysmal aorta (SAA) 25-29 mm at baseline. For each case, one control was randomly selected, all active smokers with aortic diameter less than 25 mm at baseline, matched for age and year of screening. Telephone interviews were performed at a median 34 months (range: 4-67) after screening.
Men with AAA had hypertension more often than controls (68% vs. 23%, p
PubMed ID
24878236 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of pregnant women who engage in binge alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209012
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):789-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1997
Author
J. Gladstone
M. Levy
I. Nulman
G. Koren
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology/Toxicology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):789-94
Date
Mar-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cocaine
Counseling
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To characterize pregnant women who engage in binge drinking and to identify other risk behaviour that these women engage in.
Observational study based on retrospective review of records.
A telephone and outpatient counselling service in Toronto that advises pregnant women about exposure to drugs, chemicals, radiation and infections during pregnancy and lactation.
All pregnant women who sought counselling concerning fetal risk of exposure to binge drinking from 1985 to 1994 as well as those counselled by telephone from 1993 to 1994, and an equal number of control women who sought counselling.
Information about binges, demographic factors, history of elective and spontaneous abortion, and use of psychotropic drugs and cigarettes as well as marijuana, cocaine and other illicit drugs.
Of the 3800 women seen in the clinic, 119 (3.1%) reported binge drinking during pregnancy; of the 19,991 women counselled by telephone, 153 (0.8%) reported binge drinking during pregnancy. The mean number of drinks per binge was 7.2 (standard deviation 2.5). None of the women was an alcoholic; 83.1% had binged fewer than 10 times during their pregnancy. A large majority (84.0%) of the women had a binge early in the first trimester (before 6 weeks' gestation). In comparison with control women, the women who had engaged in binge drinking were significantly younger (mean 30.0 v. 27.9 years, p
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):807-89084386
PubMed ID
9084383 View in PubMed
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Comparison of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour regarding smoking among Estonian and Finnish physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171283
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):378-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kersti Pärna
Kaja Rahu
Noël C Barengo
Mati Rahu
Patrick H Sandström
Vesa J Jormanainen
Markku T Myllykangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Estonia. kersti.parna@ut.ee
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2005;50(6):378-88
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical
Estonia
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To compare smoking behaviour, attitudes and opinions towards smoking and smoking cessation among Estonian and Finnish physicians.
A cross-sectional postal survey using a self-administered questionnaire was carried out among 2,480 Estonian and 2,075 Finnish physicians.
Daily smoking prevalence was higher among Estonian physicians than among their Finnish counterparts in both male (18.6% and 6.7%) and female (6.6% and 3.6%). Compared to Estonia, physicians in Finland more often agreed that smoking is very harmful to their health, that trying to convince people to stop smoking is their responsibility and that smoking prevention should be part of the normal and special training of health professionals. In both countries, non-smoking physicians held more unfavourable attitudes towards smoking than those who were smoking.
Physicians' own smoking patterns and quitting behaviour are important because physicians serve as models for their patients and play a key role in the reinforcement of smoke-free health facilities. These results remain a challenge to medical educators, especially in Estonia. Estonia needs to improve medical education in terms of motivating physicians to ask about the smoking patterns of their patients and of training medical students and resident physicians to counsel their patients to stop smoking.
PubMed ID
16398100 View in PubMed
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A consumer evaluation of health warning labels on cigarette packages in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213668
Source
Health Mark Q. 1996;13(3):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
F G Crane
V A MacLean
Source
Health Mark Q. 1996;13(3):47-57
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Product Labeling - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reports on results of a study that examined consumers' evaluation of health warning labels on cigarette packages in Canada. Some health warning labels were rated, overall, as more effective as well as more believable, convincing and reasonable than others. Analysis of the differences in responses by smokers and non-smokers is also presented.
PubMed ID
10158488 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Danish physicians and smoking habits among the Danes. What to do?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67376
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1475
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2002
Author
Jørgen Vestbo
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1475
Date
Mar-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Physician's Role
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
PubMed ID
11924468 View in PubMed
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Decreasing prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm and changes in cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282605
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):651-658
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Sven-Erik Persson
Kurt Boman
Anders Wanhainen
Bo Carlberg
Conny Arnerlöv
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2017 Mar;65(3):651-658
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aortography - methods
Blood pressure
Computed Tomography Angiography
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lipids - blood
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Prevalence
Protective factors
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ultrasonography
Abstract
A significant reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular disease, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), has been observed in the past decades. In this study, a small but geographically well defined and carefully characterized population, previously screened for AAA and risk factors, was re-examined 11 years later. The aim was to study the reduction of AAA prevalence and associated factors.
All men and women aged 65 to 75 years living in the Norsjö municipality in northern Sweden in January 2010 were invited to an ultrasound examination of the abdominal aorta, registration of body parameters and cardiovascular risk factors, and blood sampling. An AAA was defined as an infrarenal aortic diameter =30 mm. Results were compared with a corresponding investigation conducted in 1999 in the same region.
A total of 602 subjects were invited, of whom 540 (90%) accepted. In 2010, the AAA prevalence was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8%-8.5%) among men compared with 16.9% (95% CI, 12.3%-21.6%) in 1999 (P 
PubMed ID
27793513 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.