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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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A 9-year follow-up study of participants and nonparticipants in sigmoidoscopy screening: importance of self-selection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93168
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Blom Johannes
Yin Li
Lidén Annika
Dolk Anders
Jeppsson Bengt
Påhlman Lars
Holmberg Lars
Nyrén Olof
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, K53, Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. johannes.blom@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Sigmoidoscopy - utilization
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-selection may compromise cost-effectiveness of screening programs. We hypothesized that nonparticipants have generally higher morbidity and mortality than participants. METHODS: A Swedish population-based random sample of 1,986 subjects ages 59 to 61 years was invited to sigmoidoscopy screening and followed up for 9 years by means of multiple record linkages to health and population registers. Gender-adjusted cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) and overall and disease group-specific and mortality rate ratio (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for nonparticipants relative to participants. Cancer and mortality rates were also estimated relative to the age-matched, gender-matched, and calendar period-matched Swedish population using standardized incidence ratios and standardized mortality ratios. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent participated. The incidence of colorectal cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), other gastrointestinal cancer (IRR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.6-12.8), lung cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), and smoking-related cancer overall (IRR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5) tended to be increased among nonparticipants relative to participants. Standardized incidence ratios for most of the studied cancers tended to be >1.0 among nonparticipants and
PubMed ID
18483338 View in PubMed
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The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
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The 21-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study: risk factor levels, secular trends and east-west difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180902
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Juonala
J S A Viikari
N. Hutri-Kähönen
M. Pietikäinen
E. Jokinen
L. Taittonen
J. Marniemi
T. Rönnemaa
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an on-going multicentre study of atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and young adults. We have collected risk factor data in the 21-year follow-up performed in 2001. The aims of this analysis were to examine the levels, secular trends and east-west difference in risk factors amongst young adults.
Population based follow-up study.
A total of 2283 participants aged 24-39 years in 2001 (63.5% of the original cohort).
Levels of serum lipids, apolipoproteins, blood pressure and smoking.
The mean serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in 24-39-year-old adults were 5.16, 3.27, 1.29 and 1.34 mmol L(-1), respectively. Total cholesterol (5.21 vs. 5.12 mmol L(-1), P = 0.046), HDL cholesterol (1.31 vs. 1.28 mmol L(-1), P = 0.027), systolic blood pressure (118 vs. 115 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
15049880 View in PubMed
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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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1991 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Smoking and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration: an MRI study of identical twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65039
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M C Battié
T. Videman
K. Gill
G B Moneta
R. Nyman
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Comparative Study
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine whether disc degeneration, as assessed through magnetic resonance imaging, is greater in smokers than in nonsmokers. To control for the maximum number of potentially confounding variables, pairs of identical twins highly discordant for cigarette smoking were selected as study subjects. Data analyses revealed 18% greater mean disc degeneration scores in the lumbar spines of smokers as compared with nonsmokers. The effect was present across the entire lumbar spine, implicating a mechanism acting systemically. This investigation demonstrates the efficiency of using carefully selected controls in studying conditions of multifactorial etiology, such as disc degeneration.
PubMed ID
1948392 View in PubMed
Less detail

[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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ABCC2 transporter gene polymorphisms, diet and risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126046
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 May;47(5):572-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012

Abdominal and gynoid adipose distribution and incident myocardial infarction in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143340
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
P. Wiklund
F. Toss
J-H Jansson
M. Eliasson
G. Hallmans
A. Nordström
P W Franks
P. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - radionuclide imaging
Blood Glucose - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The relationships between objectively measured abdominal and gynoid adipose mass with the prospective risk of myocardial infarction (MI) has been scarcely investigated. We aimed to investigate the associations between fat distribution and the risk of MI.
Total and regional fat mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 2336 women and 922 men, of whom 104 subsequently experienced an MI during a mean follow-up time of 7.8 years.
In women, the strongest independent predictor of MI was the ratio of abdominal to gynoid adipose mass (hazard ratio (HR)=2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-3.32 per s.d. increase in adipose mass), after adjustment for age and smoking. This ratio also showed a strong association with hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertriglyceridemia (P
PubMed ID
20498655 View in PubMed
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2510 records – page 1 of 251.