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ABCC2 transporter gene polymorphisms, diet and risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126046
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 May;47(5):572-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012

The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of the smoking cessation intervention in a large population-based study: the Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67180
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Charlotta Pisinger
Jørgen Vestbo
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Troels Thomsen
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Nordre Ringvej, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. chpi@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Potential exists for improving the impact of quit-smoking programmes, by recruiting smokers in early motivational stages, by using active recruitment strategies, and by offering professional assistance to quit. METHODS: This was a randomized population-based intervention study, in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 2,408 daily smokers in all motivational stages were included. All participants completed a questionnaire, and underwent a health examination and a lifestyle consultation. Smokers in the high-intensity intervention were offered assistance to quit smoking in smoking cessation groups. RESULTS: Before the lifestyle consultation only 11% of the smokers stated that they planned to quit within one month. After the lifestyle consultation 27% accepted smoking cessation in groups and an additional 12% planned to quit without assistance. Of the smokers who accepted smoking cessation groups 23% had not been planning to quit before the lifestyle consultation. Being a woman, having high tobacco consumption, having a long smoking history, having tried to quit within the previous year, and having a higher motivation to quit predicted participation in smoking cessation groups. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to recruit a large number of smokers in early motivational stages by using active recruitment strategies and by offering assistance to quit. Lifestyle consultations markedly increased the number of smokers willing to try to quit. Smokers preferred assistance to quit in a smoking cessation group to quitting on their own; therefore, it is important to improve recruitment strategies for smoking cessation programmes.
PubMed ID
15823975 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of lifestyle and psychosocial problems and persistence of adverse lifestyle over two-year follow-up among Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265971
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Eveliina Heikkala
Jouko Remes
Markus Paananen
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity
Questionnaires
Smoking
Abstract
Adolescent'psychosocial problems associate with unhealthy behaviors, but data on co-occurring patterns is sparse. We investigated 1) whether adolescents could be categorized into meaningful subgroups with respect to psychosocial and lifestyle factors, 2) whether the prevalence of physical inactivity, overweight and smoking vary within the subgroups and 3) whether these unhealthy behaviors persist in a two-year follow-up.
The study was based on a subgroup of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort, which consisted of adolescents who replied to a postal questionnaire at 16 years (n?=?6792) and a subgroup of this sample at 18 years (n?=?1552). Latent class analysis (LCA) was performed to establish clusters at 16 years.
Smoking co-existed with emotional and behavioral problems in both genders. Boys with the most inactive lifestyle slept poorly, whereas multiple problems co-occurred among girls. Those with a high body mass index (BMI) separated as groups of their own. Different combinations of adverse lifestyle and emotional and behavioral problems were relatively common in both sexes as only 51% of boys and 67% of girls belonged to the reference cluster with low probability for these findings. Physical inactivity, high BMI and smoking tended to persist over the two-year follow-up.
It seems that lifestyle and psychosocial factors divide adolescents into distinct subgroups in which unhealthy lifestyle patterns remain between the ages of 16 and 18. This may indicate problems in other life areas and expose them to an increased risk of future health problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884444 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of material and lifestyle problems among daily smokers in Norway 1999 to 2013 - a cross-sectional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285121
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 12;16:781
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2016
Author
Gunnar Sæbø
Elisabeth Kvaavik
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 12;16:781
Date
Aug-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - trends
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - trends
Smoking Cessation
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
International studies have found that smoking is increasingly concentrated among lesser-privileged individuals and marginalised groups, indicating a possible rise in daily smokers' accumulated problem burden. The study asks whether material shortages and occurrence of behaviours related to poor health are increasing among daily smokers in Norway, and whether the time trends differ between daily smokers on the one hand, and occasional and non-smokers on the other.
The study used data acquired by biennial cross-sectional surveys from 1999 to 2013 of the adult (i.e. over 15) Norwegian population. Time trends in individual and accumulated material and lifestyle problems among daily smokers and non-daily and non-smokers combined were assessed using logistic regression analyses for men and women separately.
The accumulation of problems in any isolated survey is higher among daily smokers than other respondents. Over the longer term, however, there are few signs of decline in any group, except in regards to frequent alcohol drinking, which increased in all studied groups. The only problem factor differentiating daily smokers from occasional smokers/non-smokers that did change during the period was quality of diet. While problem accumulation declined in all but one group, i.e., male daily smokers, the difference between them and the group of occasional smokers and non-smokers was not significant.
Daily smokers are generally worse off than occasional smokers and non-smokers combined. However, the accumulation of material problems and health-risk behaviours by daily smokers and occasional smokers/non-smokers did not change significantly and all groups had fewer problems in 2013 than in 1999.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27519316 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of psychosocial and lifestyle factors and risk of low back pain in adolescence: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276396
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Paula Mikkonen
Eveliina Heikkala
Markus Paananen
Jouko Remes
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Life Style
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Low back pain (LBP) is common already in adolescence, and many risk indicators including both psychosocial and lifestyle factors have been recognized. Our purpose was to assess whether the co-occurrence of psychosocial (externalizing and internalizing) problems and lifestyle factors (leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, smoking, and overweight/obesity) associate with LBP at 16 years cross-sectionally or with new LBP at 18-year follow-up.
The study population, drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, consisted of 1625 participants (712 boys and 913 girls) who completed a questionnaire on potential explanatory factors at 16 years and on LBP at 16 and 18 years. The outcome measure was 'reporting LBP' or 'consultation for LBP' during the past 6 months. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was utilized to study the co-occurrence of the explanatory factors.
Among both genders, four clusters were found. Externalizing behaviour problems were associated with 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.5, boys 1.4, girls) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.6 for both genders) at baseline among both genders. In addition, the cluster of multiple risk behaviours was associated with both 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.3) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 2.5) and the obese cluster with 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.7) among girls. Externalizing behaviour problems at 16 years predicted 'consultation for LBP' at 18 years among girls (RR 3.6).
Our results stress the role of psychosocial factors in reporting and seeking care for adolescent LBP.
PubMed ID
26070550 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health and health behaviour as predictors of injury death. A prospective cohort follow-up of 652,530 person-years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158113
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Leena Koivusilta
Tapio Nummi
Pekka Kannus
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. ville.mattila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:90
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Injuries represent an important cause of mortality among young adults. Longitudinal studies on risk factors are scarce. We studied associations between adolescents' perceived health and health behaviour and injury death.
A prospective cohort of 57,407 Finns aged 14 to 18 years was followed for an average of 11.4 years. The end-point of study was injury death or termination of follow-up in 2001. The relationships of eight health and health behaviour characteristics with injury death were studied with adjusted Cox's proportional hazard model.
We identified 298 (0.5%) injury deaths, 232 (0.9%) in men and 66 (0.2%) in women. The mean age at death was 23.8 years. In the models adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic background, the strongest risk factors for injury death were recurring drunkenness (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.1) and daily smoking (HR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3-2.2). Poor health did not predict injury death. Unintentional and intentional injury deaths had similar health and health behavioural risk factors.
Health compromising behaviour adopted at adolescence has a clear impact on the risk of injury death in adulthood independent from socioeconomic background. On the other hand, poor health as such is not a significant predictor of injury death. Promotion of healthy lifestyle among adolescents as part of public health programmes would seem an appropriate way to contribute to adolescent injury prevention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18366651 View in PubMed
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[Adolescent social life and smoking in high schools--a dialectical perspective on health education]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67161
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 May 30;167(22):2399-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2005
Author
Liselotte Ingholt
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Institut for Psykologi. liselotte.ingholt@psy.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 May 30;167(22):2399-402
Date
May-30-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Denmark
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - psychology
PubMed ID
15987030 View in PubMed
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Adult health practices in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233140
Source
Vital Health Stat 5. 1988 May;(3):1-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
T. Stephens
C A Schoenborn
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Md.
Source
Vital Health Stat 5. 1988 May;(3):1-72
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - trends
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence levels of 12 health practices in the United States and Canada are compared in this study: smoking; drinking status; average daily alcohol consumption; physical activity; eating breakfast; use of seatbelts and child safety restraints; ownership of smoke detectors; recency of blood pressure checks, breast examinations, and Pap tests; and practice of breast self-examination. Data for two additional variables--drinking and driving and blood pressure awareness--are shown for the two countries, but the statistics cannot be strictly compared. Data are presented for four age groups by sex and for three levels of education. Trends in smoking and seatbelt use between 1979 and 1985 are also discussed.
PubMed ID
3275162 View in PubMed
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Age- and gender-specific prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in 40,102 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke: a Nationwide Danish Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139905
Source
Stroke. 2010 Dec;41(12):2768-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Klaus Kaae Andersen
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Tom Skyhøj Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Section for Statistics, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Stroke. 2010 Dec;41(12):2768-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Brain Ischemia - complications - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
We describe the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors at stroke onset in men and women of all ages.
A registry started in 2001, designed to register all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds 40,102 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. Patients underwent evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, intermittent arterial claudication, previous myocardial infarction, body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption. We estimated the independent effect of gender and age on prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and calculated age and gender-specific prevalence rates for each risk factor.
The register contained 47.9% women and 52.1% men. Men had more often diabetes mellitus, previous myocardial infarction, intermittent arterial claudication, and over the limit alcohol consumption. Women had more often hypertension and obesity. Atrial fibrillation and smoking were equally frequent in both genders. Age stratification revealed that the lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors smoking, alcohol, and obesity were more common in the younger patients with stroke ( 70 to 80 years), the decrease being generally more pronounced in men than in women.
Cardiovascular risk factors were generally more prevalent in men. Lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors were more common in the young. Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, and, in men, also atrial fibrillation go down after the age of 70 to 80 years.
PubMed ID
20966413 View in PubMed
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673 records – page 1 of 68.