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450K epigenome-wide scan identifies differential DNA methylation in newborns related to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122072
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Bonnie R Joubert
Siri E Håberg
Roy M Nilsen
Xuting Wang
Stein E Vollset
Susan K Murphy
Zhiqing Huang
Cathrine Hoyo
Øivind Midttun
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Per M Ueland
Michael C Wu
Wenche Nystad
Douglas A Bell
Shyamal D Peddada
Stephanie J London
Author Affiliation
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - blood
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
DNA Methylation
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Fetal Blood
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear.
We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy.
We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K).
We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):a40223026408
Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):A455
PubMed ID
22851337 View in PubMed
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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper in maternal blood and developmental placental tissue: differences between Finland, Estonia, and St. Petersburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198281
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Kantola
R. Purkunen
P. Kröger
A. Tooming
J. Juravskaja
M. Pasanen
S. Saarikoski
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Finland. marjatta.kantola@uku.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
7-Alkoxycoumarin O-Dealkylase - metabolism
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cadmium - analysis - blood
Copper - analysis - blood
Drug Interactions
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Placenta - chemistry - enzymology
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Regression Analysis
Russia
Smoking - blood - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - blood
Abstract
Cadmium, zinc, and copper from placental tissue and blood samples at the first trimester (n = 64) and at term (n = 152) were analyzed; the welfare of newborns and placental 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities in vitro were determined. The study material was collected from Finland, Estonia, and Russia. The results demonstrate that Cd starts to accumulate in the placenta during the first trimester and that Zn and Cu contents were significantly higher at the first trimester than at term. Among nonsmokers a negative correlation was found between placental Cu content and birth weight of neonates. Among smokers a positive correlation between placental Zn content and birth weight and ECOD activity was found. The birth weights correlated inversely with the length of time the mothers smoked. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in the samples collected from St. Petersburg. The data demonstrate an inverse accumulation of Zn and Cd throughout the pregnancy in the placenta and maternal blood samples. Zn may act as a positive marker or even an enzymatic enhancement for the human placental vital functions. Smoking, parity, age, and especially the place of residence affect the Cd, Zn, and Cu contents and ratios in placenta and mother's blood.
PubMed ID
10845782 View in PubMed
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Adolescent pregnancy outcomes in the province of Ontario: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115757
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Nathalie Fleming
Natalia Ng
Christine Osborne
Shawna Biederman
Abdool Shafaaz Yasseen
Jessica Dy
Ruth Rennicks White
Mark Walker
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Newborn Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few Canadian studies have examined the association between adolescent pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this cohort study was to characterize the association between adolescent pregnancy and specific adverse maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal outcomes, as well as maternal health behaviours.
We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of all singleton births in Ontario between January 2006 and December 2010, using the Better Outcomes Registry and Network database. Outcomes for pregnant women
PubMed ID
23470111 View in PubMed
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Adolescents born extremely preterm: behavioral outcomes and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138950
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anne-Li Hallin
Karin Stjernqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anne-li.hallin@psychology.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Aspirations (Psychology)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Internal-External Control
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Fifty-two extremely premature born and 54 full-term controls were assessed regarding behavioral outcomes, risk-taking and self-perceived quality of life. Behavioral outcomes were assessed with the Achenbach Youth Self Report; risk-taking was estimated regarding alcohol and nicotine use; self-perceived quality of life and future expectations were rated; and attention and hyperactivity problems were surveyed retrospectively with the Wender Utah Rating Scale. The prematurely born reported fewer problems than full-term born on the externalizing scale (delinquent behavior and aggressive behaviour); and they reported less alcohol consumption. No difference was observed between the two groups concerning nicotine use, views about quality of life and expectations for the future or in the retrospective assessment of attention and hyper-activity problems. Conclusively, the prematurely born adolescents described a quality of life and future expectations comparable to full-term born controls. They also reported fewer behavioral problems and less risk-taking behavior.
PubMed ID
21121924 View in PubMed
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Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296661
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-03-2018
Author
Anna A Usynina
Vitaly Postoev
Jon Øyvind Odland
Andrej M Grjibovski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø 9037, Norway. perinat@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Date
02-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Body Weight
Delivery, Obstetric
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive Tract Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012-2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (
PubMed ID
29401677 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes related to advanced maternal age compared with smoking and being overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105162
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ulla Waldenström
Vigdis Aasheim
Anne Britt Vika Nilsen
Svein Rasmussen
Hans Järnbert Pettersson
Erica Schytt
Erica Shytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, and the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; and the Center for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bergen University College, and the Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes and to compare the risks related to advanced maternal age with those related to smoking and being overweight or obese.
A population-based register study including all nulliparous women aged 25 years and older with singleton pregnancies at 22 weeks of gestation or greater who gave birth in Sweden and Norway from 1990 to 2010; 955,804 women were analyzed. In each national sample, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of very preterm birth, moderately preterm birth, small for gestational age, low Apgar score, fetal death, and neonatal death in women aged 30-34 years (n=319,057), 35-39 years (n=94,789), and 40 years or older (n=15,413) were compared with those of women aged 25-29 years (n=526,545). In the Swedish sample, the number of additional cases of each outcome associated with maternal age 30 years or older, smoking, and overweight or obesity, respectively, was estimated in relation to a low-risk group of nonsmokers of normal weight and aged 25-29 years.
The adjusted OR of all outcomes increased by maternal age in a similar way in Sweden and Norway; and the risk of fetal death was increased even in the 30- to 34-year-old age group (Sweden n=826, adjusted OR 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.37; Norway n=472, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.12-1.41). Maternal age 30 years or older was associated with the same number of additional cases of fetal deaths (n=251) as overweight or obesity (n=251).
For the individual woman, the absolute risk for each of the outcomes was small, but for society, it may be significant as a result of the large number of women who give birth after the age of 30 years.
II.
Notes
Erratum In: Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):669Shytt, Erica [corrected to Schytt, Erica]
PubMed ID
24463670 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native cancer epidemiology in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3515
Source
Public Health. 1998 Jan;112(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
R J Bowerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Services, Barrow, Alaska 99723, USA.
Source
Public Health. 1998 Jan;112(1):7-13
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - etiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Cancer incidence and its possible relation to environmental contaminants, including radiation, continues to be a perceived health threat for the arctic-dwelling Alaska Native (Inupiat Eskimo) people despite the lack of a direct link to high-dose exposure. To better understand this concern, all known malignancies diagnosed in this population (n = 177) in three consecutive eight-year periods (1971-1994) were evaluated. The most recent average incidence rate (age-adjusted to world standard population) of 315 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval, CI = 248-382) represents a 33% surge (albeit non-significant) in Alaska Native cancer incidence over the initial period studied. The male rate 366 (95% CI = 266-466) for the same period exceeds the female rate 258 (95% CI = 169-347) by 42%. Two patterns of cancer incidence are seen at the village level. One, a 24 y upward trend found in the villages of Barrow, Point Hope and Kaktovik (combined rate of increase significant [P = 0.047]) associated with lung cancer; and the other, a stable trend over the past 16 y, associated with colon and rectal cancer. Lung cancer is the predominant cancer by site and is primarily a male disease. The recent male lung cancer incidence rate of 137 (95% CI = 73-201) exceeds the female rate by greater than five times. Total lung cancer cases are primarily confined to four villages where the incidence significantly (P = 0.0043) exceeds the remaining population. The major female cancers are colon/rectal and breast with cancer of the cervix virtually eliminated. Breast cancer is found primarily in two villages where its excess is significant (P = 0.025). Inupiat Eskimo cancer epidemiology is unique, differing from both the Alaska Native and other Circumpolar populations. At present, this uniqueness cannot be explained by an overt environmental contaminant exposure. Although tobacco very likely plays a central role, it by itself cannot fully explain the extremely high male lung cancer rate and why only specific villages are affected. Genetic predisposition and environmental factors may play a synergistic role as cofactors. A cooperative investigative effort with the Inupiat population is indicated and may go a long way in reducing cancer concern in the region.
PubMed ID
9490882 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking: effect on pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12867
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Jun;26(2):437-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1983
Author
King JC
Fabro S
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Jun;26(2):437-48
Date
Jun-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Alcohol Drinking
Birth weight
Counseling
Female
Fertility
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Fetal Death - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Risk
Smoking
Sudden Infant Death - etiology
Abstract
Both cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy remain an important concern for the practicing obstetrician, who should provide current information on the potential detrimental effects of these habits. There appears to be a wide spectrum of fetal phenotypic response to the effects of alcohol. This phenotypic variability may be partially explained by the dose, timing, and pattern of gestational exposure, the metabolism of mother or fetus, or other environmental and genetic factors. At the most severe end of the spectrum are infants with the unique combination of anomalies termed the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The abnormalities most typically associated with alcohol teratogenicity can be grouped into 4 categories: central nervous system (CNS) dysfunctions; growth deficiencies; a characteristic cluster of facial abnormalites, and variable major and minor malformations. To make a diagnosis of fullblown FAS, abnormalities in all 4 categories must be present. Along the continuum toward normal are infants with various combinations of FAS anomalies. One of the most common and serious defects associated with ethanol teratogenicity is mental retardation. Recent evidence supports the concept of a prenatal origin to the problem. At birth infants with FAS are deficient for both length and weight, usually at or below the 3rd percentile for both parameters. Growth and mental deficiency are seen in many conditions, but the rather striking facial appearance of children with FAS secures the diagnosis. The characteristic face in small children includes short palpebral fissures, short upturned nose, hypoplastic philtrum, hypoplastic maxilla, and thinned upper vermilion. A table lists the variety of malformations that may be found in other organ systems in patients with FAS. The likelihood of miscarriage increases directly with alcohol consumption. Risk of abortion is twice as high in women consuming 1 ounce of absolute alcohol (AA) as infrequently as twice a week. Alcohol has severe effects on a wide variety of animal species, and these effects are reviewed. FAS has been estimated to occur between 1 in 600 and 1 in 1000 live births in the US, France, and Sweden. Possible interference with placentation or implantation has been suggested by the observed increased frequency of spontaneous abortion of a chromosomally normal conceptus for women who smoke. On average, infants born to women who smoke during pregnancy are 200 gm lighter than babies born to comparable women who do not smoke. From a review of these studies, the relationship between smoking and reduced birth weight is independent of all other factors that influence birth weight. The finding of antepartum bleeding of unknown cause has consistently been found more often in smokers, compared with nonsmokers. In almost all studies, the incidence of preeclampsia has been found to be reduced in smokers. Sudden infant death syndrome has been found to be closely associated with both the frequency and level of maternal smoking during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
6851292 View in PubMed
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470 records – page 1 of 47.