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A 10 year asthma programme in Finland: major change for the better.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168103
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
T. Haahtela
L E Tuomisto
A. Pietinalho
T. Klaukka
M. Erhola
M. Kaila
M M Nieminen
E. Kontula
L A Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P O Box 160, FIN-00029 HUS, Finland. tari.haahtela@hus.fi
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Communication
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Insurance, Disability - economics
Interprofessional Relations
National Health Programs - economics - trends
Pharmaceutical Services - standards
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A National Asthma Programme was undertaken in Finland from 1994 to 2004 to improve asthma care and prevent an increase in costs. The main goal was to lessen the burden of asthma to individuals and society.
The action programme focused on implementation of new knowledge, especially for primary care. The main premise underpinning the campaign was that asthma is an inflammatory disease and requires anti-inflammatory treatment from the outset. The key for implementation was an effective network of asthma-responsible professionals and development of a post hoc evaluation strategy. In 1997 Finnish pharmacies were included in the Pharmacy Programme and in 2002 a Childhood Asthma mini-Programme was launched.
The incidence of asthma is still increasing, but the burden of asthma has decreased considerably. The number of hospital days has fallen by 54% from 110 000 in 1993 to 51 000 in 2003, 69% in relation to the number of asthmatics (n = 135 363 and 207 757, respectively), with the trend still downwards. In 1993, 7212 patients of working age (9% of 80 133 asthmatics) received a disability pension from the Social Insurance Institution compared with 1741 in 2003 (1.5% of 116 067 asthmatics). The absolute decrease was 76%, and 83% in relation to the number of asthmatics. The increase in the cost of asthma (compensation for disability, drugs, hospital care, and outpatient doctor visits) ended: in 1993 the costs were 218 million euro which had fallen to 213.5 million euro in 2003. Costs per patient per year have decreased 36% (from 1611 euro to 1031 euro).
It is possible to reduce the morbidity of asthma and its impact on individuals as well as on society. Improvements would have taken place without the programme, but not of this magnitude.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16877690 View in PubMed
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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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The 1978 national survey of smoking habits of Canadian school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237316
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 Mar-Apr;77(2):139-46
Publication Type
Article

[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and the growth of lung function: three cross-sectional surveys of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3566
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body Height
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Inuits
Lung - growth & development - physiology
Male
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate - physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - physiology
Smoking - physiopathology
Somatotypes
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The influence of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle upon the growth and development of lung volumes has been studied in Inuit children aged 9-19 years. Surveys were conducted in the circumpolar community of Igloolik (69 degrees 40'N, 81 degrees W) in 1969/70, 1979/80 and 1989/90. Over this period, the children showed little change of height or body mass at any given age, but a progressive loss of what initially had been a high level of health-related fitness. The sample for each survey comprised about 70% of children in the chosen age range: in the most recent study 87 males and 65 females. Respiratory data included forced vital capacity, one-second forced expiratory volume, maximal mid-expiratory flow rate (second and third surveys only), smoking habits and respiratory health. In each of the 3 surveys, many of the older children in the community were regular smokers. The average cigarette consumption currently rises progressively to 13 +/- 8 cigarettes/day in 87% of males and 11 +/- 7 cigarettes/day in 95% of females over 17 years of age. Nevertheless, lung volumes show the anticipated increase as a logarithmic function of stature. Furthermore, statistically fitted curves show only minor inter-survey differences in volumes for a given standing height. We thus conclude that the deterioration in other aspects of health-related fitness has not yet influenced the growth and development of respiratory function within this Inuit population.
PubMed ID
7973102 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a smoking cessation and prevention website for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98333
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Maile Taualii
Nigel Bush
Deborah J Bowen
Ralph Forquera
Author Affiliation
Seattle Indian Health Board and the Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Alaska
Child
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods
Urban Population
Abstract
Tobacco use among American Indian youth is a disproportionately significant problem. We adapted and modified an existing web-based and youth-focused tobacco control program to make it appropriate for young urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). The results of the focus group indicate that AI/AN youth were very receptive to the use of a web-based Zine-style intervention tool. They wanted the look and feel of the website to be more oriented toward their cultural images. Future research should examine if successful programs for reducing non-ceremonial tobacco use among urban AI/AN youth can keep young irregular smokers from becoming adult smokers.
PubMed ID
20082169 View in PubMed
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ADHD after fetal exposure to maternal smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97943
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Apr;12(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Frank Lindblad
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. frank.lindblad@neuro.uu.se
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Apr;12(4):408-15
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy has been reported to be associated with a twofold to fourfold increased risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the offspring. Genetic and socioeconomic confounders may contribute to this association. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between fetal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and ADHD, taking such potential confounders into consideration. METHODS: A register study in a population of 982,856 children, 6-19 years of age, born at term, and residents in Sweden in 2006 was conducted. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) of maternal smoking habits during pregnancy on ADHD medication in the 927,007 study subjects where maternal smoking habits were available from the Medical Birth Register in the presence of socioeconomic and parental psychiatric morbidity confounders. To adjust the analysis also for genetic confounding, we used a within-mother between-pregnancy approach in offspring of 26,292 mothers with inconsistent smoking habits (smoking/non-smoking) between pregnancies. RESULTS: The OR for ADHD medication in offspring of mothers who smoked >or=10 cigarettes/day was 2.86 (2.66-3.07) in the entire study population after adjustment for sex and age, while this same exposure yielded an OR of only 1.26 (0.95-1.58) when two pregnancies of the same mother were analyzed in a within-subjects design. DISCUSSION: Smoking during pregnancy has a strong association with ADHD in the offspring in the general Swedish population, but this risk is primarily explained by genetic and socioeconomic confounding.
PubMed ID
20176681 View in PubMed
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Adolescent injuries in Canada: findings from the Canadian community health survey, 2000-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164771
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Dec;13(4):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Frank Mo
Michelle C Turner
Daniel Krewski
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5, Canada.
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2006 Dec;13(4):235-44
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
This article presents a description of injuries among 24312 Canadian adolescents, aged 12-24 years, based on the Canadian Community Health Survey, 2000-2001. A total of 3214 (25.6%) males and 2227 (16.5%) females reported having at least one serious injury in the past year. The leading causes of injury in adolescents were: falls; overexertion or strenuous movement; accidentally bumped, pushed or bitten; and accidentally struck or crushed by objects. The parts of the body most often affected were the ankles/feet, wrists/ hands and knees/lower legs. The most frequent locations of injuries were: sports or athletic areas; home; school, college or university areas; and the street, highway or pavement. Injuries were more often reported to have occurred during the summer months. Low socio-economic status was inversely associated with the occurrence of injury in the past year whereas risk-taking behaviour in the form of cigarette smoking and drinking alcohol was positively associated with injury occurrence.
PubMed ID
17345722 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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786 records – page 1 of 79.