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Alcohol Consumption and Long-Term Labor Market Outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291234
Source
Health Econ. 2017 Mar; 26(3):275-291
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Petri Böckerman
Ari Hyytinen
Terhi Maczulskij
Author Affiliation
Turku School of Economics, Labour Institute for Economic Research and IZA, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Health Econ. 2017 Mar; 26(3):275-291
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Self Report
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper examines whether alcohol consumption is related to long-term labor market outcomes. We use twin data for Finnish men and women matched to register-based individual information on employment and earnings. The twin data allow us to account for the shared environmental and genetic factors. The quantity of alcohol consumption was measured by weekly average consumption using self-reported data from three surveys (1975, 1981 and 1990). The average of an individual's employment months and earnings were measured in adulthood over the period 1990-2009. The models that account for the shared environmental and genetic factors reveal that former drinkers and heavy drinkers both have almost 20% lower earnings compared with moderate drinkers. On average, former drinkers work annually approx. 1 month less over the 20-year observation period. These associations are robust to the use of covariates, such as education, pre-existing health endowment and smoking. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
26634338 View in PubMed
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Association between long-term smoking and leisure-time physical inactivity: a cohort study among Finnish twins with a 35-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294221
Source
Int J Public Health. 2017 Sep; 62(7):819-829
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Maarit Piirtola
Jaakko Kaprio
Karri Silventoinen
Pia Svedberg
Tellervo Korhonen
Annina Ropponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 20/FIMM (Tukholmankatu 8, 2B), 00014, Helsinki, Finland. maarit.piirtola@helsinki.fi.
Source
Int J Public Health. 2017 Sep; 62(7):819-829
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Twins - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate longitudinal associations of smoking and a change in smoking status with leisure-time physical inactivity. In addition, to control whether familial confounding (genetics and shared environment) influences the associations.
Data were based on the population-based Finnish Adult Twin Cohort of 5254 twin individuals born in 1945-1957 (41% men) and who participated in all four surveys over a 35-year follow-up (1975-2011). Logistic and conditional logistic regression models with multiple covariates were used for analyses.
Compared to never-smokers, long-term daily smokers (1975-1990) had the highest likelihood for both long-term inactivity and to change into inactive by 2011. Recurrent smoking was associated with long-term inactivity. Instead, in comparison to persistent daily smokers, quitting smoking decreased the likelihood of becoming physically inactive at leisure time. The associations remained in the analyses which accounted for multiple covariates and/or familial confounding.
Daily smoking increases the likelihood of remaining or becoming physically inactive over the decades. Our results emphasize not only the importance of preventing smoking initiation, but also to support early smoking cessation in promotion of lifelong physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28488098 View in PubMed
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If you drink, don't smoke: Joint associations between risky health behaviors and labor market outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295488
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 06; 207:55-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
06-2018
Author
Petri Böckerman
Ari Hyytinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Terhi Maczulskij
Author Affiliation
University of Jyväskylä, School of Business and Economics, Labour Institute for Economic Research and IZA, Pitkänsillanranta 3A, FI-00530 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: petri.bockerman@labour.fi.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 06; 207:55-63
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Twins - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines the links between risky health behaviors and labor market success. We provide new evidence on the joint relationships between the most prominent forms of risky health behavior?-?alcohol consumption, smoking and physical inactivity?-?and long-term labor market outcomes. We use twin data for Finnish men and women linked to register-based individual information on earnings and labor market attachment. The twin data allow us to account for shared family and environmental factors and to measure risky health behaviors in 1975 and 1981. The long-term labor market outcomes were measured in adulthood as an average over the period 1990-2009. The sample sizes are 2156 and 2498 twins, for men and women, respectively. We find that being both a smoker and a heavy drinker in early adulthood is negatively related to long-term earnings and employment later in life, especially for men. We conclude that how and why risky health behaviors cluster and how that affects individual level outcomes call for more attention.
PubMed ID
29730550 View in PubMed
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Prospective association between tobacco smoking and death by suicide: a competing risks hazard analysis in a large twin cohort with 35-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291483
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Sep; 47(12):2143-2154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Sep-2017
Author
A E Evins
T Korhonen
T H Kinnunen
J Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Massachusetts General Hospital,Boston,MA,USA.
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Sep; 47(12):2143-2154
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between smoking and suicide remains controversial.
A total of 16 282 twin pairs born before 1958 in Finland and alive in 1974 were queried with detailed health and smoking questionnaires in 1975 and 1981, with response rates of 89% and 84%. Smoking status and dose, marital, employment, and socio-economic status, and indicators of psychiatric and somatic illness were assessed at both time points. Emergent psychiatric and medical illness and vital status, including suicide determined by forensic autopsy, were evaluated over 35-year follow-up through government registries. The association between smoking and suicide was determined in competing risks hazard models. In twin pairs discordant for smoking and suicide, the prospective association between smoking and suicide was determined using a matched case-control design.
Smokers had a higher cumulative suicide incidence than former or never smokers. Heavy smokers had significantly higher suicide risk [hazard ratio (HR) 3.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.31-5.22] than light smokers (HR 2.30, 95% CI 1.61-3.23) (p = 0.017). Compared with never smokers, smokers, but not former smokers, had increased suicide risk (HR 2.56, 95% CI 1.43-4.59), adjusting for depressive symptoms, alcohol and sedative-hypnotic use, and excluding those who developed serious somatic or psychiatric illness. In twin pairs discordant for smoking and suicide, suicide was more likely in smokers [odds ratio (OR) 6.0, 95% CI 2.06-23.8].
Adults who smoked tobacco were more likely to die by suicide, with a large, dose-dependent effect. This effect remained after consideration of many known predictors of suicide and shared familial effects, consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to tobacco smoke increases the risk of suicide.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28399944 View in PubMed
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