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Association of chronic mucus hypersecretion with FEV1 decline and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease morbidity. Copenhagen City Heart Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67664
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 May;153(5):1530-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
J. Vestbo
E. Prescott
P. Lange
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen City Heart Study, Epidemiological Research Unit, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 May;153(5):1530-5
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Lung - secretion
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mucus - secretion
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Spirometry
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between chronic mucus hypersecretion, and FEV1 decline, and subsequent hospitalization from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We used data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study on 5,354 women and 4,081 men 30 to 79 yr of age with assessment of smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, and spirometry at two surveys 5 yr apart. Information on COPD hospitalization during 8 to 10 yr of subsequent follow-up was obtained from a nationwide register. Chronic mucus hypersecretion was significantly associated with FEV1 decline; the effect was most prominent among men, where chronic mucus hypersecretion at both surveys was associated with an excess FEV1 decline of 22.8 ml/yr (95% confidence interval, 8.2 to 37.4) compared with men without mucus hypersecretion, after adjusting for age, height, weight change, and smoking; in women, the excess decline was 12.6 ml/yr (0.7-24.6). Chronic mucus hypersecretion was associated with subsequent hospitalization due to COPD after adjusting for age and smoking; relative risk was 5.3 (2.9 to 9.6) among men and 5.1 (2.5 to 10.3) among women. After further adjusting for FEV1 at the second survey, the relative risk was reduced to 2.4 (1.3 to 4.5) for men and 2.6 (1.2 to 5.3) for women. Chronic mucus hypersecretion was significantly and consistently associated with both an excess FEV1 decline and an increased risk of subsequent hospitalization because of COPD.
PubMed ID
8630597 View in PubMed
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Changes in smoking habits and risk of asthma: a longitudinal population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15453
Source
Eur Respir J. 2001 Sep;18(3):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
N S Godtfredsen
P. Lange
E. Prescott
M. Osler
J. Vestbo
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2001 Sep;18(3):549-54
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology
Causality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Selection Bias
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
A common statement from exsmokers is that symptoms of asthma develop shortly after smoking cessation. This study, therefore, investigated the relationship between smoking cessation and development of asthma in a large cohort from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS). The CCHS is a longitudinal, epidemiological study of the general population from the capital of Denmark, conducted between 1976 and 1994. The study population involved the 10,200 subjects who provided information on self-reported asthma and smoking habits from the first two examinations (baseline and 5-yr follow-up), and the 6,814 subjects who also attended the third and last examination (10-yr follow-up). The point-prevalence of smoking cessation as well as the asthma incidence between examinations was estimated, and a multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine the relationship between changes in smoking habits and development of asthma. During the study period, asthma incidence increased from 1.2-4.2%. Between examinations 1,316 subjects quit smoking. Smoking cessation between examinations was significantly related to reported asthma at follow-up. With never-smokers as the reference group and following adjustment for sex, age, chronic bronchitis, level of forced expiratory volume in one second and pack-yrs of smoking, the odds ratio (OR) for developing asthma when quitting smoking between examinations was 3.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-8.2) from baseline to first follow-up and 3.1 (95% CI 1.9-5.1) from first to second follow-up. Continuing smoking also increased the risk of asthma significantly (OR 2.6 and 2.0, respectively). The results indicate that exsmokers have a higher incidence of self-reported asthma than never-smokers. It is likely that subjects perceive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as asthma, hence the relationship between smoking cessation and asthma might be due to misclassification rather than causality.
PubMed ID
11589354 View in PubMed
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Chronic obstructive lung disease in Copenhagen: cross-sectional epidemiological aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12315
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jul;226(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
P. Lange
S. Groth
J. Nyboe
M. Appleyard
J. Mortensen
G. Jensen
P. Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen City Heart Study, Medical Department B, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jul;226(1):25-32
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Bronchi - secretion
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - physiopathology
Socioeconomic Factors
Vital Capacity
Abstract
We analysed data from the Copenhagen City Heart Study to study the prevalence, possible risk factors for, and inter-relations between bronchial hypersecretion (BH) and chronic airflow limitation. The study sample consisted of 12,698 subjects between 20 years and 90 years of age, randomly selected from the population of the city of Copenhagen. The age-adjusted overall prevalence of BH in the population of Copenhagen was estimated to be 10.1%; 12.5% in men and 8.2% in women. The overall prevalence of clinically relevant chronic airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in 1 s less than 60% of that predicted) was 3.7% and not significantly different between sexes. Both airflow limitation and BH increased with age, smoking, alcohol consumption, short education, and low income. However, the association of airflow limitation with alcohol consumption, education and income was much weaker than the association with smoking. Regardless of smoking habits, the majority of subjects with airflow limitation did not report symptoms of bronchial hypersecretion.
PubMed ID
2787829 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2001 Aug;56(4):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
C S Ulrik
P. Lange
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Respiratory Diseases, Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. csulrik@dadlnet.dk
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2001 Aug;56(4):349-53
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Abstract
Cigarette smoking is a well-know health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview concerning the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with regard to longitudinal changes in lung function and mortality for patients with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in children, especially maternal smoking, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Environmental tobacco exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms, but also with lower quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased health care utilisation for asthma, including hospital admissions. Active smoking appears not to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but it is associated with worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function and asthma-related mortality. Based on the current knowledge, it therefore seems of utmost importance to encourage patients with asthma not to smoke. In line with this, patients with asthma should be given full support in their right to a smoke-free environment.
PubMed ID
11770219 View in PubMed
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Cystic fibrosis Delta F508 heterozygotes, smoking, and reproduction: studies of 9141 individuals from a general population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33848
Source
Genomics. 1998 May 15;50(1):89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1998
Author
M. Dahl
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
H H Wittrup
P. Lange
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, DK-2730, Denmark.
Source
Genomics. 1998 May 15;50(1):89-96
Date
May-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology - genetics
Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Gene Frequency
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Reproduction - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasian populations. It remains a puzzle how this disease is maintained at such a remarkably high incidence, however, it could be due to a reproductive advantage in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. We tested this hypothesis. An adult Danish general population sample of 9141 individuals was screened for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes; 250 carriers of this mutation were identified (2.7%). In the total sample DeltaF508 heterozygotes did not have more children than noncarriers; however, smoking interacted with genotype in predicting number of children (ANOVA: P
PubMed ID
9628826 View in PubMed
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Decline of lung function in adults with bronchial asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15945
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Sep;150(3):629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
C S Ulrik
P. Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Medicine P, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Sep;150(3):629-34
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate the annual decline of lung function in subjects with self-reported asthma, we analyzed data from a longitudinal epidemiologic study. The Copenhagen City Heart Study. The study sample consisted of 10,952 subjects (4,824 men), 20 to 90 yr of age, randomly selected from the city of Copenhagen followed over a 5-yr period. The overall prevalence of asthma was 3.7% (n = 177) in men and 3.6% (n = 219) in women. Subjects who reported asthma at the first examination had, in general, lower values for lung function than did nonasthmatic subjects, which was also the case for subjects who developed asthma during follow-up (new asthma). The annual loss of FEV1 increased with age among both asthmatics and nonasthmatics. Multiple regression analysis showed a higher decline of FEV1 in subjects with new asthma. The excess decline was, on average, 39 ml/yr in men (p = 0.002) and 11 ml/yr in women (NS), respectively, compared with that in nonasthmatic subjects. In subjects with chronic asthma, the decline was not increased compared with that in nonasthmatic subjects. Separate analyses of lifelong nonsmokers revealed that the excess decline of FEV1 in subjects with new asthma was, on average, 33 ml/yr, whereas it was not significantly increased in subjects with chronic asthma. In conclusion, this study of a large sample from the general population showed that the rate of decline of FEV1 is increased in subjects with new asthma, whereas in subjects with chronic asthma the decline of FEV1 did not differ significantly from the decline in the nonasthmatic subjects.
PubMed ID
8087330 View in PubMed
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Development and prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with special reference to the role of tobacco smoking. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67833
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Feb;39(1):30-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
P. Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Chest Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Feb;39(1):30-48
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Smoking - adverse effects
PubMed ID
1563294 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Does smoking increase the degree of wrinkles on the face? The Osterbro study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67881
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 25;153(9):660-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-1991
Author
P. Schnohr
P. Lange
J. Nyboe
M. Appleyard
G. Jensen
Author Affiliation
Osterbro-undersøgelsen/medicinsk afdeling B, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 25;153(9):660-2
Date
Feb-25-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Skin Aging - physiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In order to illustrate whether there is a connection between smoking and the degree of wrinkles on the face, the authors investigated an age-stratified random sample of 4,485 women and 2,485 men aged 40-69 years. The degree of wrinkles lateral to the canthus of the right eye was described without the investigator being aware of the smoking habits of the individual concerned. For both sexes, the prevalence of deep wrinkles increased with increasing age and with decreasing household income but no significant association with body mass index was demonstrated. In men, a significant association was demonstrated between the cumulated cigarette consumption and the degree of deep wrinkles while this was not the case in women. No definite explanation of this difference between the sexes could be found but a difference in exposure to sunlight and use of face cream may be the reasons.
PubMed ID
2008761 View in PubMed
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Effects of smoking and changes in smoking habits on the decline of FEV1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67944
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Oct;2(9):811-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
P. Lange
S. Groth
G J Nyboe
J. Mortensen
M. Appleyard
G. Jensen
P. Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen City Heart Study, Medical Dept B, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Oct;2(9):811-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cigarette smoking and changes in smoking habits on the decline of forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1). We studied 7,764 men and women for 5 yrs. The subjects were grouped according to self-reported smoking habits during the observation period. We found that persistent cigarette smoking, in particular heavy smoking, accelerated the decline in FEV1. In 310 subjects who quitted smoking during the observation period, the decline of FEV1 was less pronounced than the decline observed in persistent smokers. In subjects younger than 55 yrs of age, smoking reduction was associated with a less pronounced FEV1 decline, while in the elderly subjects smoking reduction had no effect on the FEV1 decline. An increase in the number of cigarettes smoked was generally associated with a more rapid decline of FEV1, while the beginning of smoking during the 5 yrs of observation did not seem to influence the decline of FEV1. We conclude that smoking cessation or reduction may lead to a demonstrable beneficial effect on the FEV1 decline within a few years.
PubMed ID
2806504 View in PubMed
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Elevated plasma fibrinogen associated with reduced pulmonary function and increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67411
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Sep 15;164(6):1008-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2001
Author
M. Dahl
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
J. Vestbo
P. Lange
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Sep 15;164(6):1008-11
Date
Sep-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Bronchitis - complications - physiopathology
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinogen - analysis
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitalization
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - blood - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - physiopathology
Abstract
We tested whether increased concentrations of the acute-phase reactant fibrinogen correlate with pulmonary function and rate of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) hospitalization. We measured plasma fibrinogen and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), and assessed prospectively COPD hospitalizations in 8,955 adults from the Danish general population. Smokers with plasma fibrinogen in the upper and middle tertile (> 3.3 and 2.7-3.3 g/L) had 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5-8%) and 2% (0-3%) lower percentage predicted FEV(1) than smokers with fibrinogen in the lower tertile (
PubMed ID
11587987 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.