Skip header and navigation

Refine By

169 records – page 1 of 17.

Alcohol and smoking behavior in chronic pain patients: the role of opioids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92152
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Ekholm Ola
Grønbaek Morten
Peuckmann Vera
Sjøgren Per
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Jul;13(6):606-12
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Complementary Therapies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - complications - drug therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate associations between chronic non-cancer pain with or without opioid treatment and the alcohol and smoking behavior. The secondary aims were to investigate self-reported quality of life, sleeping problems, oral health and the use of different health care providers. The Danish health survey of 2005 was based on a region-stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals. Data were collected via personal interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. Respondents suffering from chronic pain were identified through the question 'Do you have chronic/long-lasting pain lasting 6 months or more?' The question concerning alcohol intake assessed the frequency of alcohol intake and binge drinking. Smoking behavior assessed the daily number of cigarettes. Individuals reporting chronic pain were stratified into two groups (opioid users and non-opioid users). In all, 7275 individuals completed a personal interview and 5552 individuals completed and returned the self-administrated questionnaire. Responders with a self-reported earlier or present cancer diagnosis were excluded from the study. Hence, the final study population consisted of 5292 individuals. We found, that individuals suffering from chronic pain were less likely to drink alcohol. In opioid users alcohol consumption was further reduced. Cigarette smoking was significantly increased in individuals suffering from chronic pain and in opioid users smoking was further increased. Poor oral health, quality of life and sleep were markedly associated with chronic pain and opioid use. The use of opioids was associated with significantly more contacts to healthcare care providers.
PubMed ID
18774317 View in PubMed
Less detail

All snoring is not adenoids in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157819
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jun;72(6):879-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Katja Liukkonen
Paula Virkkula
Eeva T Aronen
Turkka Kirjavainen
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Finland. katja.liukkonen@hus.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jun;72(6):879-84
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Parents
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Snoring - epidemiology
Tonsillectomy - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of snoring in young children and to assess age, growth, previous surgery therapy, respiratory problems and sleep-related symptoms in relation to child's snoring, and to evaluate the relationship between child's snoring and parents' snoring and smoking.
A cross-sectional study evaluated 2100 children 1-6 years of age in Helsinki, Finland. Child's frequency of snoring on a five-point scale (never to every night) and age, height, weight and body mass index, previous adenotonsillectomies, tympanostomies, allergic rhinitis and respiratory infections were determined as was frequency of parental snoring and smoking. Sleep problems were determined based on Finnish or Swedish modified version of the sleep disturbance scale for Children.
Of the 2100 eligible children, 1471 (71%) returned questionnaires. Children always or often snoring numbered 92 (6.3%), sometimes snoring, 183 (12.4%), and never or occasionally snoring, 1196 (81.3%). No difference in age (p=0.06) or gender (p=0.39) existed between snorers and non-snorers. History of previous adenotonsillectomies (p
PubMed ID
18400311 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological study of REM latency and psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46638
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
H G Lund
P. Bech
L. Eplov
P. Jennum
G. Wildschiødtz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep, REM
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In an epidemiological population study 87 subjects were studied with home sleep recordings. Nineteen subjects had minor psychiatric disorders: six subjects had a minor depression, six subjects had a generalized anxiety disorder, and seven subjects had a mild vegetative discomfort syndrome. Syndrome profiles of the three groups, using the AMDP system, showed a significantly higher degree of insomnia in the anxiety group than in the depressive group. The mean rapid eye movement (REM) latency in the anxiety group was significantly longer than in the other groups, including normals. The study showed a slight tendency towards a reduced REM latency in the minor depressives, but no statistical significance was obtained.
PubMed ID
1774425 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiologic longitudinal study of sleeping problems and feeding experience of preterm and term children in southern Finland: comparison with a southern German population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204793
Source
J Pediatr. 1998 Aug;133(2):224-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
D. Wolke
B. Söhne
K. Riegel
B. Ohrt
K. Osterlund
Author Affiliation
University of Hertfordshire, Department of Psychology, Hatfield, Great Britain.
Source
J Pediatr. 1998 Aug;133(2):224-31
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Circadian Rhythm
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
To determine the influence of breast-feeding on the prevalence and persistence of sleeping problems in southern Finland (SF) and southern Germany (SG).
Prospective binational population study of infants admitted to special care units (SCUs) in geographically defined areas in SF and SG.
In SF, the number of SCU infants was 1057 (very preterm, 47; preterm, 258; term, 752); 485 term infants were control subjects. In SG, the number of SCU infants was 4427 (very preterm, 284; preterm, 1419; term, 2724).
Parent reports of child sleeping problems at 5, 20, and 56 months of age.
Night waking at 5 months of age was less frequent for SCU very preterm (25.5%), preterm (40.6%), and term infants (48%) than for term control subjects (56.7% to 59.9%) in SF. No differences in sleeping behavior according to gestation were found at 20 and 56 months. Sleeping problems were greater in SF infants (25.5% to 48%) than in SG infants (15.1% to 19.1%) at 5 months of age and were explained by a higher rate of breast-feeding in SF. Breast-feeding had no long-term effects on night waking or on co-sleeping in SF. In contrast, breast-fed infants continued to wake more often in SG.
Breast-feeding rather than gestational age is strongly related to night waking. More support for dealing with night waking might prevent early termination of breast-feeding.
PubMed ID
9709710 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between self-reported lack of sleep, low vitality and impaired glucose tolerance: a Swedish cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256577
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:700
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Susanne Andersson
Inger Ekman
Febe Friberg
Erik Bøg-Hansen
Ulf Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy of the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:700
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Report
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The increased incidence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), are serious public health issues, and several studies link sleeping disorders with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance (IR). This study explore how self-reported lack of sleep and low vitality, are associated with IGT in a representative Swedish population.
A cross-sectional survey conducted in two municipalities in South-western Sweden. Participants aged 30-75 were randomly selected from the population in strata by sex and age. Altogether, 2,816 participants were surveyed with a participation rates at 76%. Participants with normal glucose tolerance (n=2,314), and those with IGT (n=213) were retained for analyses. The participants answered a questionnaire before the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Associations for questions concerning sleeping disorders, vitality and IGT were analysed using logistic regression and were expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI.
In men a statistically significant age-adjusted association was found between self-reported lack of sleep and IGT: OR 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.4). It did not weaken after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI), smoking, education, and leisure time physical activity 2.3 (1.0-5.5, p=0.044). No such associations were found in females. Corresponding age-adjusted associations between low vitality and IGT in both men 2.8 (1.3-5.8), and women 2.0 (1.2-3.4) were successively lost with increasing adjustment.
Insufficient sleep seems independently associated with IGT in men, while low vitality was not independently associated with IGT neither in men nor women, when multiple confounders are considered. IGT should be considered in patients presenting these symptoms, and underlying mechanisms further explored.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 3;344(18):1343-5011333990
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Mar 1;165(5):677-8211874813
Cites: Diabet Med. 2002 Sep;19(9):708-2312207806
Cites: Sleep. 2002 Dec15;25(8):889-9312489896
Cites: Sleep Med Rev. 2003 Aug;7(4):297-31014505597
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2004 Apr 15;69(8):1961-815117017
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1989 May;28(2):193-2132748771
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jul 18;305(6846):160-41285753
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Oct 17;340(8825):925-91357346
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Nov;55(6):695-7007861798
Cites: Sleep. 1995 Dec;18(10):908-118746400
Cites: Diabet Med. 1998 Jul;15(7):539-539686693
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Aug 21;354(9179):622-510466662
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Apr 25;165(8):863-715851636
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005 Oct;99(4):1592-916160020
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Nov;28(11):2739-4416249549
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Mar;29(3):657-6116505522
Cites: Heart. 2007 Jan;93(1):72-716905628
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2008 May;31(5):1001-618268072
Cites: Diabetes Obes Metab. 2008 Jun;10(6):468-7517419721
Cites: Ups J Med Sci. 2008;113(2):131-4218509808
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2008 Jul;81(1):2-1218544448
Cites: Diabet Med. 2008 Jul;25(7):834-4218513304
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):77-8119060907
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2009 Mar 1;79(5):391-619275068
Cites: Curr Diab Rep. 2009 Jun;9(3):193-919490820
Cites: Sleep Med. 2009 Sep;10(8):919-2419332380
Cites: Neuropeptides. 2009 Oct;43(5):341-5319647870
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32 Suppl 2:S189-9319875550
Cites: Drugs. 2009;69 Suppl 2:13-2720047348
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2010 Jan;87(1):4-1419896746
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):105-1821062845
Cites: Annu Rev Med. 2011;62:447-6021073334
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Feb;91(2):129-3720810183
PubMed ID
23902570 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between sleep disturbance and primary headaches: the third Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99425
Source
J Headache Pain. 2010 Jun;11(3):197-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Siv Steinsmo Ødegård
Morten Engstrøm
Trond Sand
Lars Jacob Stovner
John-Anker Zwart
Knut Hagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, MTFS, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. sivstein@stud.ntnu.no
Source
J Headache Pain. 2010 Jun;11(3):197-206
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology
Female
Headache Disorders, Primary - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Norway
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between sleep disturbance and headache type and frequency, in a random sample of participants in the third Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey. The headache diagnoses were set by neurologists using the ICHD-2 criteria performing a semi structured face-to-face interview. Sleep problems were measured by the two validated instruments Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Among 297 participants, 77 subjects were headache-free, whereas 135 were diagnosed with tension-type headache (TTH), 51 with migraine, and 34 with other headache diagnoses. In the multivariate analyses, using logistic regression, excessive daytime sleepiness, defined as ESS >or= 10, was three times more likely among migraineurs compared with headache-free individuals (OR = 3.3, 95% CI 1.0-10.2). Severe sleep disturbances, defined as KSQ score in the upper quartile, was five times more likely among migraineurs (OR = 5.4, 95% CI 2.0-15.5), and three times more likely for subjects with TTH (OR = 3.3, 1.4-7.3) compared with headache-free individuals. Subjects with chronic headache were 17 times more likely to have severe sleep disturbances (OR = 17.4, 95% CI 5.1-59.8), and the association was somewhat stronger for chronic migraine (OR = 38.9, 95% CI 3.1-485.3) than for chronic TTH (OR = 18.3, 95% CI 3.6-93.0). In conclusion, there was a significant association between severe sleep disturbances and primary headache disorders, most pronounced for those with chronic headache. Even though one cannot address causality in the present study design, the results indicate an increased awareness of sleep problems among patients with headache.
PubMed ID
20224943 View in PubMed
Less detail

Avoidant safety behaviors and catastrophizing: shared cognitive-behavioral processes and consequences in co-morbid pain and sleep disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92535
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2008;15(3):201-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
MacDonald Shane
Linton Steven J
Jansson-Frojmark Markus
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral, Social, and Legal Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. shane.macdonald@bsr.oru.se
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2008;15(3):201-10
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Avoidance Learning
Behavior
Cognition
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Research and theory suggest that the symptom pair of chronic pain and insomnia may be maintained by shared cognitive-behavioral processes and consequences. PURPOSE: This investigation describes the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to assess the way people think about symptoms of pain and poor sleep. METHOD: A pool of 12 items was generated from existing and validated measures. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on item responses from a community sample of respondents who reported having had a problem with pain or sleep (n = 1702) during the three months previous to the survey. Multinomial regression analyses (MRA) were used to describe derived subscale responses for distinct groups reporting different degrees of perceived symptom severity and overlap. RESULTS: EFA suggested the existence of three distinct dimensions: safety behaviors of behavioral orientation, safety behaviors of cognitive orientation, and catastrophizing. MRA analyses indicated that catastrophizing appears to be a shared psychological process and that both types of safety behaviors may be enhanced in co-morbid problems with persistent pain and insomnia. CONCLUSION: Cognitions pertaining to avoidant safety behaviors and catastrophizing are associated with symptom severity and overlap in co-morbid pain and sleep disorders. More research is needed to explore the importance of shared psychological processes and consequences when studying and treating ill health.
PubMed ID
18696314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burnout in the working population: relations to psychosocial work factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76059
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Karin M Lindblom
Steven J Linton
Cecilia Fedeli
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro Medical Center, Orebro, Sweden. karin.lindblom@orebroll.se
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):51-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Employment - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated levels of burnout in the general population irrespective of occupation and relations between burnout and psychosocial work factors. A cross-sectional survey featuring sleep problems, psychological distress, burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey), and psychosocial factors at work, was mailed to a random sample of 3,000 participants, aged 20-60. Response rate was 61%. A high level (18%), a low level (19%), and an intermediate group (63%) for burnout were constructed. The high level group was associated with those who were > 50 years old, women, those experiencing psychological distress, and those with a poor psychosocial work climate. The analyses on variables significant in previous analyses showed that the high level group was strongly related to high demands, low control, lack of social support, and disagreeing about values at the workplace even when accounting for age, gender, and psychological distress. We conclude that psychosocial work factors are important in association to burnout regardless of occupation.
PubMed ID
16503841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in sleep problems, parents distress and impact of sleep problems from infancy to preschool age for referred and unreferred children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29730
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):86-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Marga Thome
Arna Skuladottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. marga@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):86-94
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Attitude to Health
Birth Order
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Family Health
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This article compares and describes changes in sleep problems in 3- to 5-year-old Icelandic children referred and unreferred for sleep problems in infancy and explores changes in parents' distress and the impact of children's sleep problems on families over time. The sample consisted of a clinical group (n = 31) that had been referred to a sleep-disorder clinic in infancy, and a comparative group (n = 150) of age-matched unreferred community children. Self-report scales assessed infant/child sleep pattern, the impact of the sleep problem on family life and parents' distress. Results showed that about half the children in the community group have had a sleep problem in infancy. Nightwakings improved in both the referred and unreferred group over time but remained more frequent in the unreferred group. The referred group had significantly more settling problems in infancy than the other group but settling improved markedly over time. Parents of referred children were more fatigued compared with others despite improvement of children's sleep problems over time. Mothers of referred children were however, less likely to perceive the sleep problem as troublesome for family life than the others. It is concluded that parents of referred children are more fatigued than parents of unreferred children and nightwakings are more likely to persist in children who had sleep problems in infancy than in those with no such problems.
PubMed ID
15877633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes over time in occurrence, severity, and distress of common symptoms during and after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120245
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Jun;45(6):980-1006
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Kristin Hofsø
Tone Rustøen
Bruce A Cooper
Kristin Bjordal
Christine Miaskowski
Author Affiliation
Centre for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Research, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. kristin.hofso@rr-research.no
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Jun;45(6):980-1006
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology - radiotherapy
Causality
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality of Life - psychology
Radiotherapy, Conformal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little is known about changes over time in multiple dimensions of the symptom experience in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy (RT).
This study evaluated for changes in and predictors of occurrence, severity, and distress of six common symptoms (lack of energy, worrying, difficulty sleeping, feeling drowsy, sweats, and pain) during RT for breast cancer.
Patients (n = 188) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale before, during, and after the completion of RT, over a six-month period. Changes in symptom occurrence were evaluated using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Changes in severity and distress scores were evaluated using multilevel proportional odds ordinal logistic regression. The impact of five demographic and clinical characteristics (age, functional status, comorbidities, axillary lymph node dissection, and previous chemotherapy) was evaluated in these analyses.
The trajectories for occurrence, severity, and distress for the six symptoms followed similar patterns. For three of the six symptoms (lack of energy, feeling drowsy, and worrying), all three dimensions changed over time. For the other three symptoms (difficulty sleeping, sweats, and pain), no changes over time occurred for any of the symptom dimensions. The overall effect of the five covariates was to increase symptom burden across all three dimensions.
Findings from this study provide a more complete picture of the symptom experience of women who undergo RT for breast cancer. These findings can be used to identify patients at higher risk for more severe symptoms before, during, and after RT.
PubMed ID
23026547 View in PubMed
Less detail

169 records – page 1 of 17.