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25 records – page 1 of 3.

A change in sleep pattern may predict Alzheimer disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264153
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;22(11):1262-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Elizabeth A Hahn
Hui-Xin Wang
Ross Andel
Laura Fratiglioni
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;22(11):1262-71
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - etiology
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sleep problems may adversely affect neuronal health. We examined a subjective report of change (reduced duration and/or depth) in sleep pattern in relation to subsequent risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) over 9 years.
This longitudinal study used data from a population-based sample of 214 Swedish adults aged 75 and over who were dementia-free both at baseline and at first follow-up (3 years later). The sample was 80% female and, on average, 83.4 years of age at baseline. All participants underwent a thorough clinical examination to ascertain all-cause dementia and AD.
Forty percent of participants reported a change in sleep duration at baseline. Between the 6th and 9th year after baseline, 28.5% were diagnosed with all-cause dementia, 22.0% of whom had AD. Reduced sleep was associated with a 75% increased all-cause dementia risk (hazard ratio: 1.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.93; Wald = 4.55, df = 1, p = 0.035) and double the risk of AD (hazard ratio: 2.01; 95% confidence interval: 1.12-3.61; Wald = 5.47, df = 1, p = 0.019) after adjusting for age, gender, and education. The results remained after adjusting for lifestyle and vascular factors but not after adjusting for depressive symptoms. No evidence supported a moderating effect of the use of sleeping pills, and the sleep-dementia relationship remained after controlling for the presence of the apolipoprotein E e4 allele.
Self-reported sleep problems may increase the risk for dementia, and depressive symptoms may explain this relationship. Future research should determine whether treatment, in particular, behavioral or nonpharmacologic treatment, may represent one avenue toward reduction of dementia risk in late life.
PubMed ID
23954041 View in PubMed
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Daytime sleepiness: a risk factor in community life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222965
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1992 Oct;86(4):337-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
K. Martikainen
J. Hasan
H. Urponen
I. Vuori
M. Partinen
Author Affiliation
Hatanpääpuisto Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1992 Oct;86(4):337-41
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Age Factors
Arousal
Attitude to Health
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Narcolepsy - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The prevalence of daytime sleepiness and background factors associated with it were investigated in a study carried out at the UKK Institute. The inquiry took the form of a questionnaire mailed to 1600 people of middle age. Daytime sleepiness was found to be associated with disturbed night sleep. Women were more tired than men, but men slept more frequently during the day. Those suffering from tiredness complained of poor health more than other respondents. Traffic accidents and other mishaps attributable to tiredness had occurred in 1.3% of cases, and almost 5% of male respondents had dozed off while driving at least five times in their lives. The findings indicate a need for increased attention to disturbance of sleep and daytime sleepiness in routine health screening.
PubMed ID
1455978 View in PubMed
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Effort-reward imbalance, sleep disturbances and fatigue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171477
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 May;79(5):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Göran Fahlén
Anders Knutsson
Richard Peter
Torbjörn Akerstedt
Maria Nordin
Lars Alfredsson
Peter Westerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, 851 70, Sundsvall, Sweden. goran.fahlen@miun.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 May;79(5):371-8
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Physical Exertion
Questionnaires
Reward
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model in relation to disturbed sleep and fatigue.
The study population derived from a subset of the WOLF (WOrk, Lipids, Fibrinogen) cohort study of cardiovascular risk in a working population who replied to the ERI-questionnaire comprising 789 men and 214 women. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the prevalence ratio (PR) for sleep disorders and fatigue in relation to the components of ERI.
As sleep disturbances and fatigue, based on literature, were defined to be represented by the uppermost quintile, 14% of the men and 23% of the women were affected by sleep disturbances while 14 and 26%, respectively, were affected by fatigue. Higher levels of exposure for the ERI components were associated with increased prevalence of sleep disturbances and fatigue. For men, the strongest association was seen between high overcommitment and fatigue (PR 5.77, 95% confidence interval 2.89-11.5). For women, high effort and sleep disturbances (PR 4.04, CI 1.53-10.7), high effort/reward ratio and sleep disturbances (PR 4.13, CI 1.62-10.5), and between low reward and fatigue (PR 4.36, CI 1.79-10.6) yielded the most obvious associations.
The present study adds sleep disturbances and fatigue to the list of adverse consequences of effort-reward imbalance.
PubMed ID
16362323 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology, risk factors, and consequences of obstructive sleep apnea and short sleep duration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153480
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Jan-Feb;51(4):285-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nabil M Al Lawati
Sanjay R Patel
Najib T Ayas
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Jan-Feb;51(4):285-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - complications
Aging
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Caffeine - adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Hypothyroidism - complications
Male
Obesity - complications
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
We will review the epidemiology, risk factors, and consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short/long sleep duration. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is common, with moderate to severe disease present in approximately 9% of middle aged men and 4% of women. The prevalence of OSA in certain patient populations (such as elderly patients, hypertensive patients, patients with coronary disease, and prebariatric surgery patients) is even greater. There are a number or risk factors for disease including obesity, male sex, and family history. Obstructive sleep apnea negatively impacts quality of life and is also associated with a number of adverse safety and health consequences including cardiovascular disease and motor vehicle crashes. Short habitual sleep duration can result in excessive daytime sleepiness and reduced neurocognitive function. Sleep loss may have long-term health consequences and may lead to premature death, cardiovascular disease, and the development of diabetes.
PubMed ID
19110130 View in PubMed
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A framework for the assessment and treatment of sleep problems in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134315
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Jun;58(3):667-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Penny Corkum
Fiona Davidson
Marilyn Macpherson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. penny.corkum@dal.ca
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Jun;58(3):667-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Behavior Therapy - methods
Humans
Morbidity
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have high rates of sleep problems and sleep disorders. It is critical that pediatricians assess for sleep problems during the course of ADHD assessment and when treating children with stimulant medication. Sleep must be considered in the differential diagnosis and in terms of comorbidity with ADHD. The most common sleep problem in children with ADHD is insomnia, and the first line of treatment should be the implementation of behavioral interventions rather than medication. More research is needed to determine if children with ADHD respond to behavioral interventions in a similar manner as typically developing children.
PubMed ID
21600348 View in PubMed
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Impact of daytime sleepiness underrated.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211465
Source
Lancet. 1996 Jul 13;348(9020):71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-1996
Author
A. Sharpley
Author Affiliation
Psychopharmacology Research Unit, Littlemore Hospital, Oxford, UK.
Source
Lancet. 1996 Jul 13;348(9020):71
Date
Jul-13-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8676715 View in PubMed
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Joint effect of self-reported sleep problems and three components of the metabolic syndrome on risk of coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145789
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2010 Feb;68(2):149-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Minna Loponen
Christer Hublin
Raija Kalimo
Matti Mänttäri
Leena Tenkanen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere School of Public Health, Tampere, Finland; Helsinki Heart Study, Helsinki, Finland. minna.loponen@uta.fi
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2010 Feb;68(2):149-58
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Finland
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
This study explored the joint effect of two epidemics, sleep problems and metabolic syndrome (MetS), on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).
The study group is part of the Finnish middle-aged men who participated in the first screening for the Helsinki Heart Study (HHS) in 1981-1982. At that time, three components of MetS were measured: body mass index, HDL cholesterol, and blood pressure. Later, in 1986-1988, they were given a psychosocial questionnaire including items on sleep problems. Of the respondents, 2753 formed our study group and were followed up using population-based registers until 1995. The relative risks (RR) of CHD were estimated using Cox's regression models.
When several sleep problems were present simultaneously, some increased CHD risk was observed. However, when considered jointly with MetS, insomnia or daytime fatigue approximately doubled the CHD risk and the presence of insufficient sleep more than tripled the risk. Among those who had MetS only, the RR was 2.55, and among those with both insufficient sleep and MetS the RR was 9.36 (95% confidence interval: 4.60-19.04; P for interaction 0.09) when compared to those with no insufficient sleep and no components of MetS.
The interaction occurred when all three measured MetS components were present, suggesting that co-occurrence of these two epidemics may predict growing public health problems.
Notes
Comment In: J Psychosom Res. 2010 May;68(5):503; author reply 503-420403512
PubMed ID
20105697 View in PubMed
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Mental distress, obesity and body fat distribution in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11241
Source
Obes Res. 1996 May;4(3):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
R. Rosmond
L. Lapidus
P. Mårin
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Department of Heart and Lung Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Obes Res. 1996 May;4(3):245-52
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - physiology
Aging - physiology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking
Anthropometry
Anxiety - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Body Composition - physiology
Body constitution
Body mass index
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Dyspepsia - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hydrocortisone - physiology - secretion
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Peptic Ulcer - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that psychiatric symptoms are associated with obesity and abdominal distribution of body fat in women. The aim of the present study was to examine this in middle-aged men. In 1992 a cluster selected cohort of 1040 men born in 1944 (participation rate 79.9%) was examined. Registrations of symptoms of depression and anxiety, sleep disturbances, psychosomatic disease as well as degree of life satisfaction were analyzed in relation to body mass index (BMI) and the waist/hip circumference ratio (WHR). In univariate analyses both BMI and WHR correlated with these factors. BMI and WHR were, however, closely interrelated (p = 0.61), necessitating analyses of separate, independent relationships in multivariate analyses. When adjusted for WHR all the significant relationships with BMI disappeared. In contrast the WHR, adjusted for BMI, showed remaining significant associations with the use of anxiolytics (p = 0.018), hypnotics (p = 0.029), antidepressive drugs (p = 0.008), degree of melancholy (p = 0.002), and life satisfaction (p = 0.002, negative), difficulties to sleep (p = 0.014) and fall asleep (p = 0.047), tendency to wake up from sleep (borderline, p = 0.070) and dyspepsia (p
PubMed ID
8732958 View in PubMed
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Occupational loading, health behavior and sleep disturbance as predictors of low-back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153220
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):411-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Helena Miranda
Eira Viikari-Juntura
Laura Punnett
Hilkka Riihimäki
Author Affiliation
Center of Expertise for Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250 Helsinki, Finland. Helena.Miranda@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):411-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Risk factors for low-back pain are known to co-occur, but their joint effect has not often been studied. Little is also known about the variation of the risk factors or their effects with age.
This prospective study assessed the 1-year incidence of low-back pain by age group in a Finnish industrial population. The effects of the baseline variables on the risk of low-back pain in the follow-up were estimated with a log-binomial regression.
Among 2256 blue- and white-collar workers free of low-back pain 12 months preceding the baseline, 21% reported low-back pain after 1-year of follow-up. Physical work load (sum of heavy lifting, awkward postures, and whole-body vibration) predicted low-back pain among those younger than 50 years [highest relative risk (RR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4-4.2], whereas health behavior (sum of smoking, overweight, and lack of physical exercise) increased the risk only among those 50 years or older (RR up to 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.4). Mental stress, dissatisfaction with life, and sleep problems were significant predictors in the group of 40- to 49-year-old workers. Work-related psychosocial factors were not associated with the outcome.
In this study, workers of different ages were affected by slightly different risk factors. The results support the provision of health promotion and stress management as part of programs to prevent work-related low-back pain. In particular, aging workers may benefit from such an integrated approach. More prospective studies on the joint effects of age-specific risk factors of low-back pain are warranted.
PubMed ID
19137202 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in COPD and its implications for prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259720
Source
Eur Respir J. 2014 Jun;43(6):1590-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Peter Lange
Jacob Louis Marott
Jørgen Vestbo
Børge Grønne Nordestgaard
Source
Eur Respir J. 2014 Jun;43(6):1590-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspnea - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mucus
Myocardial Ischemia - complications
Prevalence
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The information on night-time symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is sparse. We investigated the prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in 6616 individuals with COPD recruited from the general population in the Copenhagen area, Denmark, and described characteristics and prognosis of subjects with this symptom. The prevalence of night-time dyspnoea was 4.3%: 2.1% in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) group A, 12.9% in GOLD B, 2.6% in GOLD C and 16.3% in GOLD D. Compared with individuals without night-time dyspnoea, those with night time dyspnoea had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s, higher daytime dyspnoea scores (modified Medical Research Council scale) and more wheezing, more often had chronic mucus hypersecretion, ischaemic heart disease and atrial fibrillation, and more often reported stress, nervousness and tiredness. After adjustment for age and sex, the presence of night-time dyspnoea was associated with future COPD exacerbations (hazard ratio (HR) 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.0), hospital admissions due to COPD (HR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.4) and mortality (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). Prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in COPD increases with disease severity according to both spirometric and clinical GOLD classification, and is associated with presence of daytime respiratory symptoms and cardiac comorbidities. Night-time dyspnoea is a significant predictor of poor prognosis in individuals with COPD.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2014 Jun;43(6):1560-224881057
PubMed ID
24488571 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.