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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Can anatomical and functional features in the upper airways predict sleep apnea? A population-based study in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169165
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2006 Jun;126(6):613-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Malin Svensson
Mats Holmstrom
Jan-Erik Broman
Eva Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head- and Neck Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. malin.l.svensson@akademiska.se
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2006 Jun;126(6):613-20
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Airway Obstruction - diagnosis - physiopathology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Laryngoscopy
Middle Aged
Palate, Soft - physiopathology
Pharynx - physiopathology
Polysomnography
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Retrognathia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - physiopathology
Snoring - physiopathology
Sweden
Uvula - physiopathology
Abstract
The importance of clinical findings in the nose and throat, including fiberoptic endoscopy during the Muller maneuver, in predicting sleep apnea is greater in normal-weight than in overweight women.
The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could predict sleep apnea in women.
From 6817 women who previously answered a questionnaire concerning snoring habits, 230 women who reported habitual snoring and 170 women from the whole cohort went through a full-night polysomnography. A nose and throat examination including fiber endoscopic evaluation of the upper airways during the Muller maneuver was performed in a random selection of 132 women aged 20-70 years.
Sleep apnea was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index of > or = 10. The influence of clinical features on the prevalence of sleep apnea varied between normal-weight and overweight women. A low soft palate, retrognathia, the uvula touching the posterior pharyngeal wall in the supine position, and a 75% or more collapse at the soft palate during the Muller maneuver were all significant predictors of sleep apnea in women with a body mass index (BMI)
PubMed ID
16720446 View in PubMed
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Long-term improvements in pulmonary function 5 years after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259725
Source
Obes Surg. 2014 May;24(5):705-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Stephen Hewitt
Sjur Humerfelt
Torgeir T Søvik
Erlend T Aasheim
Hilde Risstad
Jon Kristinsson
Tom Mala
Source
Obes Surg. 2014 May;24(5):705-11
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - etiology - physiopathology
Bariatric Surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity, Morbid - complications - physiopathology - surgery
Postoperative Period
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - physiopathology
Spirometry
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vital Capacity
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is associated with reduced pulmonary function. We evaluated pulmonary function and status of asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) before and 5 years after bariatric surgery.
Spirometry was performed at baseline and 5 years postoperatively. Information of asthma and OSAS were recorded. Of 113 patients included, 101 had undergone gastric bypass, 10 duodenal switch and 2 sleeve gastrectomy.
Eighty (71%) patients were women, mean preoperative age was 40 years and preoperative weight was 133 kg in women and 158 kg in men. Five years postoperatively, weight reduction was 31% (42 kg; p?
PubMed ID
24435516 View in PubMed
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Obstructive sleep apnea is a risk factor for death in patients with stroke: a 10-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158864
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2008 Feb 11;168(3):297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2008
Author
Carin Sahlin
Olov Sandberg
Yngve Gustafson
Gösta Bucht
Bo Carlberg
Hans Stenlund
Karl A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2008 Feb 11;168(3):297-301
Date
Feb-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - mortality
Stroke - complications - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Sleep apnea occurs frequently among patients with stroke, but it is still unknown whether a diagnosis of sleep apnea is an independent risk factor for mortality. We aimed to investigate whether obstructive or central sleep apnea was related to reduced long-term survival among patients with stroke.
Of 151 patients admitted for in-hospital stroke rehabilitation in the catchment area of Umeå from April 1, 1995, to May 1, 1997, 132 underwent overnight sleep apnea recordings at a mean (SD) of 23 (8) days after the onset of stroke. All patients were followed up prospectively for a mean (SD) of 10.0 (0.6) years, with death as the primary outcome; no one was lost to follow-up. Obstructive sleep apnea was defined when the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was 15 or greater, and central sleep apnea was defined when the central apnea-hypopnea index was 15 or greater. Patients with obstructive and central apnea-hypopnea indexes of less than 15 served as control subjects.
Of 132 enrolled patients, 116 had died at follow-up. The risk of death was higher among the 23 patients with obstructive sleep apnea than controls (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.95; P = .03), independent of age, sex, body mass index, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and Barthel index of activities of daily living. There was no difference in mortality between the 28 patients with central sleep apnea and controls (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-1.76; P = .80).
Patients with stroke and obstructive sleep apnea have an increased risk of early death. Central sleep apnea was not related to early death among the present patients.
PubMed ID
18268171 View in PubMed
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Perceived informational needs, side-effects and their consequences on adherence - a comparison between CPAP treated patients with OSAS and healthcare personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91777
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Feb;74(2):228-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Broström Anders
Strömberg Anna
Ulander Martin
Fridlund Bengt
Mårtensson Jan
Svanborg Eva
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Feb;74(2):228-35
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Principal Component Analysis
Questionnaires
Self Care
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare perceptions among continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treated patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and healthcare personnel with regard to informational needs, side-effects and their consequences on adherence. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive design was used including 350 CPAP treated OSAS patients from three Swedish hospitals and 105 healthcare personnel from 26 Swedish hospitals. Data collection was performed using two questionnaires covering informational needs, side-effects and adherence to CPAP. RESULTS: Both groups perceived all surveyed informational areas as very important. Patients perceived the possibilities to learn as significantly greater in all areas (p
PubMed ID
18835124 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of high alcohol and benzodiazepine consumption in sleep apnea patients studied with blood and urine tests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9267
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Dec;124(10):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Pia Nerfeldt
Peter Graf
Stefan Borg
Danielle Friberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. pia.nerfeldt@kus.se
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Dec;124(10):1187-90
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - diagnosis
Benzodiazepines - urine
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxytryptophol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Transferrin - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of alcoholism and benzodiazepine abuse among patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Such abuse may aggravate the tendency to apneas, especially in patients with OSAS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 98 consecutive OSAS patients. Two patients dropped out; blood samples could not be obtained from two other patients and a urine sample could not be obtained from one. Blood and urine samples were examined for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) and 5-hydroxytryptophol (5-HTOL), markers of excess alcohol intake, and urine-benzodiazepines (u-Benz), a marker of drug abuse. Patients with positive screening tests were offered therapy for their abuse. RESULTS: The CDT test was positive in 8/94 patients (8.5%), the 5-HTOL test in 6/95 (6.3%) and the u-Benz test in 3/95 (3.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings correlate well with current views concerning alcohol and drug abuse in Sweden, and do not indicate that the frequency of such abuse is higher among OSAS patients. It should be noted that none of the patients who screened positive in the laboratory tests admitted to being alcohol or drug abusers when they consulted their physician. We recommend screening all OSAS patients for alcohol abuse using not only a questionnaire but also a laboratory test such as the CDT test.
PubMed ID
15768816 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2003 Dec;123(9):1094-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ake Dahlqvist
Eva Rask
Carl-Johan Rosenqvist
Carin Sahlin
Karl A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. ake.dahlqvist@vll.se
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2003 Dec;123(9):1094-7
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Down Syndrome - complications - physiopathology
Echocardiography
Female
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea has been reported to occur in 20-50% of children with Down's syndrome in case series of patients referred for evaluation of suspected sleep apnea. In this population-based controlled study, we aimed to investigate whether sleep apnea is related to Down's syndrome.
Every child aged 2-10 years with Down's syndrome residing in the Umeå healthcare district (n = 28) was invited to participate in the study, with their siblings acting as controls. Successful overnight sleep apnea recordings and echocardiography were performed in 17/21 children with Down's syndrome and in 21 controls.
Obstructive sleep apnea could not be diagnosed, either in children with Down's syndrome or in the control children. The apnea-hypopnea index in the children with Down's syndrome was 1.2 +/- 1.5 and did not differ from that in controls. Snoring and hypertrophy of the tonsils were more common in children with Down's syndrome than in controls. Children with Down's syndrome slept for a shorter time (p
PubMed ID
14710914 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.