Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Acidification of distal esophagus and sleep-related breathing disturbances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179752
Source
Chest. 2004 Jun;125(6):2101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Soren Berg
Victor Hoffstein
Thorarinn Gislason
Author Affiliation
Lund Sleep Study Group, Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 2004 Jun;125(6):2101-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagus - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Polysomnography - methods
Pressure
Probability
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sleep Stages
Abstract
To investigate whether distal esophageal acidification occurs during sleep in patients suspected of sleep-disordered breathing, and whether such acidification is related to respiratory abnormalities.
Fourteen middle-aged, snoring men all complaining of daytime sleepiness and suspected of having obstructive sleep apnea.
Sleep laboratory, Pulmonary Department, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Each patient underwent full nocturnal polysomnography testing, which included continuous monitoring of esophageal pressure (Pes) and pH. We identified all pH events, which were defined as a reduction in esophageal pH of >/= 1.0. During each pH event, the respiratory recordings where examined for the presence of apneas or hypopneas, and Pes was recorded. The data were analyzed to determine the possible relationships between pH events and respiratory events, and between changes in pH and changes in Pes. We found that there were more respiratory events than pH events. The mean (+/- SD) number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep was 33 +/- 22, whereas the mean number of pH events per hour of sleep was 7 +/- 6. Overall, 81% of all pH events were associated with respiratory events. Correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between pH events and the magnitude of Pes or apnea-hypopnea index.
Episodes of esophageal acidification are common in patients with sleep apnea, and are usually associated with respiratory and pressure events. However, changes in pH were independent of the magnitude of the Pes.
PubMed ID
15189928 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing Faces of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Treatment Effects by Cluster Designation in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297750
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
03-01-2018
Author
Grace W Pien
Lichuan Ye
Brendan T Keenan
Greg Maislin
Erla Björnsdóttir
Erna Sif Arnardottir
Bryndis Benediktsdottir
Thorarinn Gislason
Allan I Pack
Author Affiliation
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
Source
Sleep. 2018 03 01; 41(3):
Date
03-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - methods - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys - trends
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Wakefulness - physiology
Abstract
Distinct clinical phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been identified: Disturbed Sleep, Minimally Symptomatic, and Sleepy. Determining whether these phenotypes respond differently to standard treatment helps us to create a foundation for personalized therapies. We compared responses to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy in these clinical OSA phenotypes.
The study sample included 706 patients from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort with moderate-to-severe OSA who were prescribed PAP. Linear and logistic mixed models were used to compare 2-year changes in demographics, comorbid diseases, and sleep-related health issues within and across OSA clinical phenotypes. Relationships between changes in symptoms and PAP adherence were also examined.
Overall, effect sizes were moderate to large when comparing sleepiness, insomnia-related, and apneic symptom changes in the Sleepy group with changes in other two groups, especially those in the Minimally Symptomatic group. Within the Disturbed Sleep group, PAP users and nonusers demonstrated similar changes in insomnia-related symptoms. The Minimally Symptomatic group remained relatively asymptomatic, but reported significant decreases in daytime sleepiness and physical fatigue; PAP users generally had larger improvements. The Sleepy group had reductions in nearly all measured symptoms, including large reductions in drowsy driving; almost all of these improvements were greater among PAP users than nonusers.
OSA treatment response patterns differed by initial clinical phenotype and PAP adherence. Individuals with insomnia-related symptoms may require additional targeted therapy for these complaints. These findings underscore the need for a personalized approach to management that recognizes patients with a range of OSA presentations.
Notes
CommentIn: Sleep. 2018 Mar 1;41(3): PMID 29538762
PubMed ID
29301021 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical presentation of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with end-stage renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146894
Source
J Clin Sleep Med. 2009 Apr 15;5(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2009
Author
Jaime M Beecroft
Andreas Pierratos
Patrick J Hanly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Clin Sleep Med. 2009 Apr 15;5(2):115-21
Date
Apr-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Polysomnography
Renal Dialysis
Retrospective Studies
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Snoring
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is largely underrecognized. Our objective was to determine whether the presentation of OSA in patients with ESRD differs from the stereotypical presentation in the general population (loud snoring, witnessed apnea, and daytime sleepiness in overweight, middle-aged men).
Seventy-six chronic dialysis patients with OSA were compared to 380 OSA patients with normal renal function who were matched for apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index). All patients underwent overnight polysomnography and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and a questionnaire to assess symptoms of OSA.
Age and gender distribution were similar between groups, however, body mass index was lower in the ESRD group (28 +/- 5 vs. 33 +/- 14 kg/m2). Patients with ESRD were less likely to report snoring (80% vs. 98%), witnessed apnea during sleep (32% vs. 58%), unrefreshing sleep (55% vs. 73%), and morning headaches (15% vs. 27%). Overnight polysomnography revealed less intense snoring and more sleep disturbance in patients with ESRD. The prevalence and severity of self-reported daytime sleepiness was similar between groups.
The presenting symptoms of patients with ESRD and documented OSA differed from a control group of OSA patients matched for AHI. This suggests that the presentation of ESRD patients with OSA may differ from the general population, and this should be appreciated to avoid underdiagnosis of this important comorbidity.
Notes
Cites: Clin Nephrol. 2000 Jun;53(6):460-610879666
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jan 11;344(2):102-711150360
Cites: J Hypertens. 2001 Feb;19(2):287-9311212972
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2001 Jan;16(1):70-711208996
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2002 Mar;13(3):729-3311856778
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Feb;41(2):394-40212552502
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Feb;41(2):403-1012552503
Cites: Nephron. 1985;40(4):407-104022209
Cites: Am J Med. 1989 Mar;86(3):308-142919612
Cites: Clin Nephrol. 1990 May;33(5):247-512354561
Cites: Sleep. 1991 Dec;14(6):540-51798888
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Apr 29;328(17):1230-58464434
Cites: Kidney Int. 1993 May;43(5):1134-98510393
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Apr 1;122(7):487-927872582
Cites: Sleep. 1995 Jun;18(5):330-37676165
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 1995 Aug;6(2):192-77579084
Cites: Nephron. 1995;71(2):138-428569943
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007 Oct;22(10):3028-3317556419
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2007 Nov;30(5):965-7117626107
Cites: Adv Perit Dial. 1997;13:88-929360657
Cites: ANNA J. 1997 Dec;24(6):663-59444106
Cites: Kidney Int. 1998 Apr;53(4):1078-849551420
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Jun 2;97(21):2154-99626176
Cites: Nephrology (Carlton). 2004 Dec;9(6):353-6115663636
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2005 Mar;20(3):571-715671074
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2005 Feb;18(2 Pt 1):152-715752940
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2005 May;45(5):875-8215861353
Cites: Nephrology (Carlton). 2005 Aug;10(4):330-516109076
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Jul;28(1):151-816510459
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Sep;17(9):2607-1616885414
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Dec;17(12):3503-917082238
Cites: Nephron Clin Pract. 2007;105(1):c35-4217114901
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007 Apr;22(4):1190-717277346
PubMed ID
19968043 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression and sleep-related symptoms in an adult, indigenous, North American population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92220
Source
J Clin Sleep Med. 2008 Aug 15;4(4):356-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2008
Author
Froese Colleen L
Butt Arsalan
Mulgrew Alan
Cheema Rupi
Speirs Mary-Ann
Gosnell Carmen
Fleming Jon
Fleetham John
Ryan C Frank
Ayas Najib T
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Source
J Clin Sleep Med. 2008 Aug 15;4(4):356-61
Date
Aug-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adult
British Columbia
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Restless Legs Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Symptoms related to sleep disorders are common and may have substantial adverse impacts on mental health. Indigenous North Americans (American Indian) are a medically vulnerable population with reduced access to healthcare services. The purposes of this study were to assess (1) the prevalence of sleep symptoms and (2) the relationships between symptoms and depression in this population. METHODS: We performed a community-based, door-to-door, cross-sectional survey of 3 indigenous North American groups (Gitxsan, Nisga'a and Tsimshian) living in the northwestern part of British Columbia. Between May and September of 2006, subjects completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included questions about sleep habits, medical history, subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and depression (Personal Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9]). Weights and heights were also measured. RESULTS: Four hundred thirty adults participated in the study (response rate = 42%). Their mean age was 43.2 years. Three hundred ninety-three agreed to have heights and weights measured. Their mean body mass index (BMI) was 31.0 +/- 9.2 kg/m2; 45% of them (177/393) were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2), and 11% (43/393) were morbidly obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2). The prevalence of sleep complaints was high; insomnia symptoms was reported by 17.2%, symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) by 17.7%, and frequent witnessed apneas reported (i.e., being told they stopped breathing at least 3 nights per week) by 7.6%. Of the 76 patients who had RLS symptoms, only 3 (3.9%) reported having received a diagnosis of RLS from a physician. Thirty-three subjects reported having frequent witnessed apneas, but only 5 of them (15.1%) reported having received a diagnosis of OSA from a physician. The mean PHQ9 score was 4.86 +/- 5.13 (reported by 389 subjects). Twenty-eight subjects (7.20%) had moderate to severe depression, with a PHQ-9 score of 15 or greater. In multivariable linear regression analysis, insomnia symptoms, witnessed apneas, and RLS symptoms were independently associated with an increase in PHQ9 score; frequent witnessed apneas were associated with an increase in PHQ9 by 2.46 (95% confidence interval: 0.47-4.46), insomnia symptoms by 4.49 (95% confidence interval: 3.14-5.83), and RLS symptoms by 1.82, (95% confidence interval: 0.53-3.12). CONCLUSIONS: Sleep symptoms and depression are common in the indigenous North American population of northern British Columbia. Sleep-related symptoms (insomnia symptoms, witnessed nocturnal apneas, and RLS symptoms) are independently associated with depression scores. Improving access to sleep-related diagnostic and therapeutic services may substantially improve mental health in this vulnerable patient population.
PubMed ID
18763428 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of CPAP on "vascular" risk factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and arterial hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113759
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2013;9:229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A Y Litvin
Z N Sukmarova
E M Elfimova
A V Aksenova
P V Galitsin
A N Rogoza
I E Chazova
Author Affiliation
Department of Systemic Hypertension, Russian Cardiology Research and Production Complex, Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russian Federation. alelitvin@yandex.ru
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2013;9:229-35
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amlodipine - therapeutic use
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Arterial Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Combinations
Female
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - therapeutic use
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Manometry
Middle Aged
Polysomnography
Predictive value of tests
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Valine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Vascular Stiffness - drug effects
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on arterial stiffness, central blood pressure, and reflected pulse wave characteristics in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stage 2-3 arterial hypertension.
Forty-four patients with hypertension and severe OSA (apnea/hypopnea index > 30) received stepped dose titration of antihypertensive treatment, consisting of valsartan 160 mg + amlodipine 5-10 mg + hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg. CPAP therapy was added after 3 weeks of continuous antihypertensive treatment with BP 12 msec) persisted in 35% of patients on antihypertensive treatment and effective CPAP, in 56% of patients on antihypertensive treatment alone, and in 53% of patients on placebo CPAP. Only the combination of antihypertensive treatment with effective CPAP achieved a significant reduction in augmentation index and AASI, along with a further reduction in aortic and brachial BP.
Effective CPAP for 3 weeks resulted in a significant additional decrease in office BP, ambulatory BP monitoring, central BP, and augmentation index, together with an improvement in arterial stiffness parameters, ie, cfPWV and AASI, in a group of hypertensive patients with OSA.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2000 Sep 14;407(6801):233-4111001066
Cites: Sleep Med Rev. 2013 Feb;17(1):19-2822575367
Cites: Chest. 2001 Apr;119(4):1085-9111296174
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jan 19;359(9302):204-1011812555
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Jul 15;166(2):159-6512119227
Cites: Intern Med. 2004 Mar;43(3):184-815098597
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Apr 29;328(17):1230-58464434
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1995 Oct;96(4):1897-9047560081
Cites: Sleep. 1999 Aug 1;22(5):667-8910450601
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Feb 1;142(3):187-9715684207
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 19-25;365(9464):1046-5315781100
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Mar 7;113(9):1213-2516476843
Cites: J Atheroscler Thromb. 2006 Apr;13(2):101-716733298
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2007 Jan;29(1):156-7817197482
Cites: Chest. 2007 May;131(5):1379-8617494787
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Jun;28(12):1462-53617562668
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Aug 28;50(9):852-817719471
Cites: Chest. 2008 Jul;134(1):94-10018347202
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Aug 19;52(8):686-71718702977
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Nov 1;178(9):984-818658111
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2009 Mar;33(3):574-8019047314
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Mar-Apr;51(5):400-1019249446
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 Aug;6(8):e100013219688045
Cites: Respiration. 2010;79(5):363-919602870
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Nov;27(11):2121-5819838131
Cites: Hypertens Res. 2011 Jan;34(1):23-3220962788
Cites: J Hypertens. 2012 Mar;30(3):445-822278144
Cites: J Hypertens. 2012 Apr;30(4):633-4622406463
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Feb;163(2):344-811179104
PubMed ID
23690688 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impaired vigilance and increased accident rate in public transport operators is associated with sleep disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117846
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2013 Mar;51:208-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Mahssa Karimi
Derek N Eder
Davoud Eskandari
Ding Zou
Jan A Hedner
Ludger Grote
Author Affiliation
Center for Sleep and Vigilance Disorders, Institution of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. mahssa.karimi@lungall.gu.se
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2013 Mar;51:208-14
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Attention
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Polysomnography
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Railroads
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Wakefulness
Abstract
Sleep disturbances can impair alertness and neurocognitive performance and increase the risk of falling asleep at the wheel. We investigated the prevalence of sleep disorders among public transport operators (PTOs) and assessed the interventional effects on hypersomnolence and neurocognitive function in those diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
Overnight polygraphy and questionnaire data from 101 volunteers (72 males, median age 48 range [22-64] years, 87 PTOs) employed at the Gothenburg Public Transportation Company were assessed. Treatment was offered in cases with newly detected OSA. Daytime sleep episodes and neurocognitive function were assessed before and after intervention.
At baseline, symptoms of daytime hypersomnolence, insomnia, restless legs syndrome as well as objectively assessed OSA (apnea hypopnea index (AHI, determined by polygraphic recording)=17[5-46]n/h) were highly present in 26, 24, 10 and 22%, respectively. A history of work related traffic accident was more prevalent in patients with OSA (59%) compared to those without (37%, p
PubMed ID
23262460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interatrial block in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135928
Source
Cardiol J. 2011;18(2):171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Adrian Baranchuk
Brendan Parfrey
Leonard Lim
Florence Morriello
Christopher S Simpson
Wilma M Hopman
Damian P Redfearn
Michael Fitzpatrick
Author Affiliation
Kingston General Hospital, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. barancha@kgh.kari.net
Source
Cardiol J. 2011;18(2):171-5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Block - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Polysomnography
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that affects 5% of the adult North American population. It is associated with atrial arrhythmias and stroke. The mechanisms of this association remain unclear. The aim to the study was to identify the factors associated with interatrial block (IAB) among patients with OSA.
Patients referred for polysomnography were studied. Sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) was measured in each subject. 12-lead ECGs were scanned and amplified (× 10); P-wave duration and dispersion were measured using a semi-automatic caliper. IAB was defined as a P-wave duration = 120 ms.
Data from 180 consecutive patients was examined. Moderate-severe OSA (mean AHI = 56.2 ± 27.9) was present in 144 (OSA group). The remaining 36 had mild or no OSA (mean AHI = 5.6 ± 3.6) and were used as controls. Age distribution between the groups did not differ and there were more males in the OSA group (69.4% vs 47.2%, p = 0.01). Obesity (78.5% vs 39.4%, p 30 were independent predictors of maximum P-wave duration (p = 0.001 and p
PubMed ID
21432824 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome associated with headache?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181650
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Mar;109(3):180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
R. Jensen
C. Olsborg
R. Salvesen
T. Torbergsen
S I Bekkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Tromsø University Hospital Department of Neurology, Nordland Central Hospital, Bodø, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. svein.ivar.bekkelund@unn.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Mar;109(3):180-4
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polysomnography
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a common disorder in the general population. Although the mechanisms remain obscure, an association with headache has been reported. We aimed to assess the frequency of OSA in a population of headache patients based on a stratified sampling technique using questionnaire and polysomnography (PSG).
The survey was provided to new outpatients examined by a neurologist for headache over a 2-year period of time. The patients completed a headache diary during 30 days and those at risk of OSA went through a PSG examination.
Of 903 headache patients, 75 reported heavy snoring and episodes of interrupted nocturnal breathing (8%). Among 43 patients examined with PSG, 14 (1.5% of the total study population) had an apnea/hypopnea index of 5 or higher. Eleven of the patients reported morning headache.
The frequency of OSA in a patients referred to specialist for headache problems is not higher than what is reported for the general population. The relatively low rate of OSA in this selected group of patients with headache referred to neurology for second opinion does not support the notion that OSA brings about headache.
PubMed ID
14763954 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.