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Human immunodeficiency virus status in facial fracture patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221376
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1993 Apr;91(4):577-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
L A Hughes
M H Bailey
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1993 Apr;91(4):577-80
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - transmission
Adult
Body Fluids
Facial Bones - injuries
Female
General Surgery
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skull Fractures - complications - surgery
Abstract
A prospective study was performed to obtain an indication of the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among the population of facial fracture patients treated at a city hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. This study was stimulated by the observation that a significant number of the patients treated at this unit were drug and alcohol abusers, inmates of a local penitentiary (where homosexual activity is believed not to be uncommon) or had no fixed address. In addition, the surgical treatment of these patients involved the use of sharp, high-powered motorized instruments e.g., saws, drills, wires, etc., and resulted in the spillage and aerosolization of considerable amounts of blood and other tissues. Operating room staff are exposed to these patients for 12 to 18 hours on many occasions. Accidental exposure to body fluids can occur easily. It was thus decided to obtain consented HIV testing of all facial fracture patients managed by the Plastic Surgery Team between July and December 1990. Fifty-two patients were seen, and 47 (90.4%) of them were tested for HIV. Results were obtained for 46 (97.8%) of those tested. One patient (2.2%) was found to be positive for HIV. This figure was smaller than anticipated considering the patient population demographics, but is not an insignificant number and thus it is advised that if any suspicion arises, consented HIV testing should be obtained and the necessary precautions taken.
PubMed ID
8446709 View in PubMed
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Is a skull X-ray necessary after milder head trauma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227302
Source
Br J Neurosurg. 1991;5(2):135-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J. Rosenørn
B. Duus
K. Nielsen
K. Kruse
T. Boesen
Author Affiliation
University Clinic of Neurosurgery, Copenhagen County Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Br J Neurosurg. 1991;5(2):135-9
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Concussion - etiology - radiography
Cerebral Hemorrhage - diagnosis - etiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - radiography
Denmark
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Risk
Skull - radiography
Skull Fractures - complications - radiography
Abstract
During the 2-year period 1985-86 a total of 1,876 patients were admitted to our hospital after milder head trauma including cerebral concussion. Two hundred and eighty four patients who had a skull X-ray were not selected from guidelines. In 1,592 patients without a skull X-ray, signs of an intracranial complication developed in six cases and were verified by CT. In the 284 patients with skull X-ray a fracture was demonstrated in 25, and of these 25 patients only one patient disclosed a cerebral contusion. In the 259 patients with skull X-ray, but without demonstration of fracture, there were subsequently seen one subdural haematoma and one cerebral contusion. The incidence of intracranial complications in patients without and with skull X-ray with or without fracture does not differ significantly. In these circumstances we do not find any justification for routine skull X-ray after milder head trauma.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Neurosurg. 1992;6(2):167-81590973
PubMed ID
1863374 View in PubMed
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Is head injury a risk factor for schizophrenia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52280
Source
Schizophr Res. 2002 May 1;55(1-2):93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2002
Author
A S Nielsen
P B Mortensen
E. O'Callaghan
O. Mors
H. Ewald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatric Demography, Institute for Basic Psychiatric Research, Psychiatric Hospital in Aarhus, Skovagervej 2, 8240 Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2002 May 1;55(1-2):93-8
Date
May-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Proneness
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Concussion - complications - epidemiology
Brain Injury, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Hemorrhage, Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Sex Factors
Skull Fractures - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The few studies that have examined whether head injury is a risk factor for later schizophrenia have had important methodological problems. METHOD: We examined the rates of head injury among 8288 persons in the 15 years up to their first admission with schizophrenia and compared them with 82880 age- and gender-matched controls. We used hospitalization for concussion or severe head injury as a definition of head injury. We controlled for any generally altered accident proneness prior to schizophrenia by also comparing the groups with respect to exposition to fractures not involving the skull or spine. RESULTS: Males with schizophrenia had significantly reduced exposure to concussion (OR = 0.864, p = 0.024), whereas females had significantly increased exposure (OR = 1.322, p = 0.025). No differences were found as regards severe head injury. Males had significantly reduced risk of other fractures (OR = 0.616, p
PubMed ID
11955968 View in PubMed
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A linear fracture and meningitis associated with non-infected cephalohematoma in a neonate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101767
Source
Neuropediatrics. 2010 Dec;41(6):276-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
B S Karagol
A. Zenciroglu
A A Kundak
N. Okumus
M. Aydin
C. Uner
Author Affiliation
Sami Ulus Maternity, Children's Education and Research Hospital, Division of Neonatology, Ankara, Turkey. belmakaragol@yahoo.com
Source
Neuropediatrics. 2010 Dec;41(6):276-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hematoma - diagnosis - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - complications - diagnosis
Skull Fractures - complications - diagnosis
Staphylococcal Infections - complications - diagnosis
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - adverse effects
Abstract
We present a neonate with cephalohematoma complicated by a linear skull fracture and Staphylococcus epidermidis meningitis. Clinicians, especially neonatologists, should be aware that a cephalohematoma in the newborn infant with a history of vacuum-assisted delivery could be the origin or trigger point of the infection either as sepsis, meningitis or osteomyelitis. The utmost importance of screening studies should be emphasized in order to be aware of the pathogenic potential of cephalohematomas.
PubMed ID
21445821 View in PubMed
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Long-term risk of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury in children and young adults: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89934
Source
Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1105-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2009
Author
Christensen Jakob
Pedersen Marianne G
Pedersen Carsten B
Sidenius Per
Olsen Jørn
Vestergaard Mogens
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1105-10
Date
Mar-28-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Injuries - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Skull Fractures - complications
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of epilepsy shortly after traumatic brain injury is high, but how long this high risk lasts is unknown. We aimed to assess the risk of epilepsy up to 10 years or longer after traumatic brain injury, taking into account sex, age, severity, and family history. METHODS: We identified 1 605 216 people born in Denmark (1977-2002) from the Civil Registration System. We obtained information on traumatic brain injury and epilepsy from the National Hospital Register and estimated relative risks (RR) with Poisson analyses. FINDINGS: Risk of epilepsy was increased after a mild brain injury (RR 2.22, 95% CI 2.07-2.38), severe brain injury (7.40, 6.16-8.89), and skull fracture (2.17, 1.73-2.71). The risk was increased more than 10 years after mild brain injury (1.51, 1.24-1.85), severe brain injury (4.29, 2.04-9.00), and skull fracture (2.06, 1.37-3.11). RR increased with age at mild and severe injury and was especially high among people older than 15 years of age with mild (3.51, 2.90-4.26) and severe (12.24, 8.52-17.57) injury. The risk was slightly higher in women (2.49, 2.25-2.76) than in men (2.01, 1.83-2.22). Patients with a family history of epilepsy had a notably high risk of epilepsy after mild (5.75, 4.56-7.27) and severe brain injury (10.09, 4.20-24.26). INTERPRETATION: The longlasting high risk of epilepsy after brain injury might provide a window for prevention of post-traumatic epilepsy.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1060-119233462
PubMed ID
19233461 View in PubMed
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Occupational hearing loss--recent trends and practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110756
Source
IMS Ind Med Surg. 1968 Mar;37(3):204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1968

Outcome following head injuries in the aged.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247651
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 1979;49(1-2):67-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
J. Hernesniemi
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 1979;49(1-2):67-79
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Female
Finland
Hematoma, Subdural - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skull Fractures - complications
Abstract
An analysis of 420 patients 60 or more years of age showed that even very mild brain injuries may be dangerous for the aged. Only one third of 174 patients with cerebral contusion made a useful recovery; of the 101 patients with cerebral contusion unconscious for six hours or more, 78 died, and only 11 made a useful recovery. The outcome in patients with acute intracranial haematomas or depressed skull fractures was poor. Even the aged with brain injuries may benefit from an intensive effort at treatment. This effort should, however, be strictly limited in time. With the present means of treating brain injury it seems futile to use limited intensive treatment resources for an acute brain injury in a patient over 70 years of age who is unconscious on admission. In contrast to acute injuries, subacute and chronic subdural haematomas should be operated on promptly in spite of severe neurological impairment or advanced age.
PubMed ID
525464 View in PubMed
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A population-based study of survival and discharge status for survivors after head injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51949
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Nov;110(5):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
A W Engberg
T W Teasdale
Author Affiliation
Department for Neurological Rehabilitation, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre Hospital, DK 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. aase.engberg@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Nov;110(5):281-90
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Intracranial Hemorrhage, Traumatic - complications - mortality
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Patient Discharge
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skull Fractures - complications - mortality
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Creation of a basis for the planning of rehabilitation after head injury in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with cranial fractures or traumatic cerebral lesions occurring in Denmark in 1979-93 were identified by computerized searches in the national hospital register. Kaplan-Meier survival functions were calculated for these two categories. Hospital records for a random sample of 389 survivors in 1997 after cranial fracture, acute brain lesion or chronical subdural haematoma, which occurred in 1982, 1987 and 1992 in patients aged 15 years or more at injury, were reviewed. Survivors were characterized by age, gender, place and severity of injury, as well as neurophysical, speech and mental deficits at discharge from hospital. RESULTS: Acute/subacute mortality of hospitalized patients was 27% for cerebral lesions and 4% after cranial fracture. As attrition by death outweighed the decreasing incidence with time, the point prevalence of survivors in 1997 after brain lesions occurring in 1982, 1987 or 1992 was nearly the same, averaging 8.4 per 100 000 of the population above age 14. Half of them were severe, as defined by initial Glasgow Coma Score
PubMed ID
15476456 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.