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A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156070
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
H A Quinney
Randy Dewart
Alex Game
Gary Snydmiller
Darren Warburton
Gordon Bell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hockey - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.
PubMed ID
18641719 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, adipose tissue distribution and mortality rates in the Canada Fitness Survey follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189366
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1054-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
C L Craig
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1054-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
To compare mortality rates across indicators of adiposity and relative adipose tissue distribution in the Canadian population.
The sample included 10,323 adult participants 20-69 y of age from the Canada Fitness Survey who were monitored for all-cause mortality over 13 y.
BMI, waist circumference (WC) and the sum of five skinfolds (SF5) were indicators of adiposity, and the first principal component of skinfold residuals (PC1) represented subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative mortality risk from mortality rates across levels of adiposity and adipose tissue distribution, controlling for the confounding effects of age, smoking status and alcohol consumption.
:Significant curvilinear (J-shaped) relationships in men and linear relationships in women were observed between BMI, WC and SF5 and all-cause mortality rates. PC1 was not related to mortality rates in either men or women. In women, the inclusion of the other indicators of adiposity and adipose tissue distribution did not significantly add to the prediction of mortality rates beyond BMI; however, combinations of BMI and both WC and SF5 produced significant models in men.
The results support the hypothesis that overall level of adiposity is an important predictor of all-cause mortality, more so than the relative distribution of subcutaneous body fat, once overall level of body fatness has been accounted for.
PubMed ID
12119570 View in PubMed
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Adiposity and glycemic control in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104801
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Clara Amalie G Timmermann
Laura I Rossing
Anders Grøntved
Mathias Ried-Larsen
Christine Dalgård
Lars B Andersen
Philippe Grandjean
Flemming Nielsen
Kira D Svendsen
Thomas Scheike
Tina K Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health (C.A.G.T., L.I.R., C.D., P.G., F.N., T.K.J.), and Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics (A.G., M.R.-L., L.B.A.), University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; and Department of Biostatistics (K.D.S., T.S.), University of Copenhagen, 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - drug effects - physiology
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Body mass index
Caprylates - blood
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood - toxicity
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
Body mass index, skinfold thickness, waist circumference, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, glucose, and triglyceride concentrations were assessed in 8- to 10-year-old children in 1997 in a subset of the European Youth Heart Study, Danish component. Plasma PFC concentrations were available from 499 children. Linear regression models were performed to determine the association between PFC exposure and indicators of adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
There was no association between PFC exposures and adiposity or markers of glycemic control in normal-weight children. Among overweight children, an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctane sulfonic acid/mL plasma was associated with 16.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2%-28.3%) higher insulin concentration, 12.0% (95% CI, 2.4%-22.4%) higher ß-cell activity, 17.6% (95% CI, 5.8%-30.8%) higher insulin resistance, and 8.6% (95% CI, 1.2%-16.5%) higher triglyceride concentrations, and an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctanoic acid/mL plasma was associated with 71.6% (95% CI, 2.4%-187.5%) higher insulin concentration, 67.5% (95% CI, 5.5%-166.0%) higher ß-cell function, 73.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-202.0%) higher insulin resistance, and 76.2% (95% CI, 22.8%-153.0%) higher triglyceride concentrations.
Increased PFC exposure in overweight 8- to 10-year-old children was associated with higher insulin and triglyceride concentrations. Chance findings may explain some of our results, and due to the cross-sectional design, reverse causation cannot be excluded. The findings therefore need to be confirmed in longitudinal studies.
PubMed ID
24606078 View in PubMed
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[Age at onset of obesity in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42203
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 1976 Sep-Oct;21(5):207-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
J C Vuille
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 1976 Sep-Oct;21(5):207-8
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Abstract
The majority of the obese children among 965 ten-year olds were overweight already at 7 yrs, but had not gained weight excessively during the first year of life. The most critical period therefore is the age between 1 and 7 yrs.
PubMed ID
997984 View in PubMed
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Alaska: an appraisal of the health and nutritional status of the Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1223
Source
Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense. [Washington, DC.] 165 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
August 1959
Age Eskimo and Indian Villages in Alaska, 1958, Arm and Scapula Skinfold Thickness, by Age and Sex Table LIST OF TABLES T i t l e - Page Table 1 2 Table 5 Introduction Eskimos, Indians and Aleuts i n Alaska i n 1950 Alaska: Characterization of the Villages i n the Study, and
  1 document  
Source
Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defense. [Washington, DC.] 165 pp.
Date
August 1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6877041
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Akiak
Kasigluk
Napaskiak
Newtok
Hooper Bay
Kotzebue
Noatak
Point Hope
Shishmaref
Diet, traditional
Diet, western
Health status
Height
Weight
Blood pressure
Skinfold thickness
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Dental caries
DMFT index
Periodontal disease
Beta-carotene
Fatty acids
Phospholipids
Cholesterol
Protein, serum
Vitamin B
Hemoglobin
Hematocrit
Riboflavin
Thiamin
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1156.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 275.
Documents

An-Appraisal-of-the-Health-and-Nutritional-Status-of-the-Eskimo-1959.pdf

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Analysis of 30 genes (355 SNPS) related to energy homeostasis for association with adiposity in European-American and Yup'ik Eskimo populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153695
Source
Hum Hered. 2009;67(3):193-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Wendy K Chung
Amit Patki
Naoki Matsuoka
Bert B Boyer
Nianjun Liu
Solomon K Musani
Anna V Goropashnaya
Perciliz L Tan
Nicholas Katsanis
Stephen B Johnson
Peter K Gregersen
David B Allison
Rudolph L Leibel
Hemant K Tiwari
Author Affiliation
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. wkc15@columbia.edu
Source
Hum Hered. 2009;67(3):193-205
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Alaska
Body Composition - genetics
Body mass index
Epistasis, Genetic
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Ghrelin - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
New York City
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skinfold thickness
Waist Circumference - genetics
Abstract
Human adiposity is highly heritable, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity in most humans are known. We tested candidate genes in pathways related to food intake and energy expenditure for association with measures of adiposity.
We studied 355 genetic variants in 30 candidate genes in 7 molecular pathways related to obesity in two groups of adult subjects: 1,982 unrelated European Americans living in the New York metropolitan area drawn from the extremes of their body mass index (BMI) distribution and 593 related Yup'ik Eskimos living in rural Alaska characterized for BMI, body composition, waist circumference, and skin fold thicknesses. Data were analyzed by using a mixed model in conjunction with a false discovery rate (FDR) procedure to correct for multiple testing.
After correcting for multiple testing, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Ghrelin (GHRL) (rs35682 and rs35683) were associated with BMI in the New York European Americans. This association was not replicated in the Yup'ik participants. There was no evidence for gene x gene interactions among genes within the same molecular pathway after adjusting for multiple testing via FDR control procedure.
Genetic variation in GHRL may have a modest impact on BMI in European Americans.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19077438 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of child health and nutrition in a northern Swedish county. 3. Medical and anthropometrical examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43810
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1971 Nov;60(6):653-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1971

An epidemiological study of child health and nutrition in a northern Swedish county. VII. A comparative study of general and dental health, food habits and socio-economic conditions in 4-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42721
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1975 Mar;64(2):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975
Author
G. Samuelson
H K Blomquist
C G Crossner
A K Holm
H. Grahnén
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1975 Mar;64(2):241-7
Date
Mar-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body Weight
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Skinfold thickness
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
A study of the general and dental health and the food habits of randomly selected 4-year-old Swedish urban children was performed. The results were compared with the findings of an investigation carried out four years earlier in the same area. In comparison with the earlier study no significant differences were found in haemoglobin values, packed red cell volume, microsedimentation rate and anthropometric measurements. The food habits had altered. A reduction in the frequency of between-meal consumption, particularly of sweets and soft drinks, as well as a reduction of the frequency of meat, fish and egg consumption was found. The children had an increased sandwich and milk consumption. The caries frequency was markedly reduced, which might be explained by the decreased between-meal consumption and an increased consumption of fluoride tablets. The food habits and the caries situation were generally influenced by the parents' socio-economic conditions, especially their educational level.
PubMed ID
1130180 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric characteristics of Mohawk children aged 6 to 11 years: a population perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201135
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Aug;99(8):955-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
L. Potvin
S. Desrosiers
M. Trifonopoulos
N. Leduc
M. Rivard
A C Macaulay
G. Paradis
Author Affiliation
University of Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Aug;99(8):955-61
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body constitution
Body mass index
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
Recent studies have concluded that Native North American children have higher proportions of overweight and obesity than children from the general North American population. This study presents anthropometric data on a representative sample of children from the Mohawk Nation that can be used for comparison with other Native American populations.
This is a cross-sectional study comparing distributions of anthropometric characteristics of Mohawk children to the corresponding age and gender data from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). Weight, height, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness, and waist and hip circumferences were measured in 527 children.
All children in grades 1 to 6 (aged 6 to 11 years) in the 3 elementary schools of 2 Mohawk communities in Canada, for whom parental consent was obtained, were enrolled in the present study. There were no exclusion criteria. With a participation rate of 83%, the 527 children enrolled in this study represent an unbiased sample of the population from 2 Mohawk territories.
Compared with children studied in NHANES II, Mohawk children were similar in height and triceps skinfolds but were generally heavier, had thicker subscapular skinfolds, and had greater waist and hip circumferences. These differences were greater in older children. Mohawk children who had extreme-high weight values compared with their population means were heavier than their NHANES II counterparts.
Results indicated that, on average, Mohawk children seem to be slightly heavier than children in NHANES II. Except for those with extreme overweight values, Mohawk children show less variation of weight and body mass index than children in NHANES II. Finally, overweight Mohawk children seem to be more likely to carry their excess body fat truncally, compared with overweight children from NHANES II. Health practitioners working with Native American populations should be careful when assessing childhood obesity. Simple comparisons of weight or body mass index with NHANES standards may lead to inappropriate risk assessments.
PubMed ID
10450311 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric data in middle-aged women. The population study of women in Göteborg 1968-1969.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247208
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1979 May;17(2):133-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979
Author
C. Bengtsson
L. Hallberg
H. Noppa
E. Tibblin
Source
Acta Morphol Neerl Scand. 1979 May;17(2):133-43
Date
May-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Chicago
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Women
Abstract
Body weight, body height, skinfolds, circumferences and weight indices in a population sample of 1462 women in ages between 38 and 60 years are presented. Significant age differences were noted. High correlations (r) were found between body weight and triceps and subscapular skinfolds (0.62 and 0.72 respectively) and between body weight and arm, waist and buttock circumferences (0.75-0.88). Age differences were mostly noted between 46 and 50 years of age. After that age there was a comparatively greater increase of the waist circumference than of the buttock circumference, while triceps skinfold seemed to decrease after the age of 50 indicating an altered adipose tissue distribution from the extremities to the trunk with increasing age. When taking data from a previous study of body weight in the same population of women into consideration it seems that the age differences in body weight found in cross-sectional study like the present one may to a large extent depend on differences between different cohorts studied.
PubMed ID
474197 View in PubMed
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244 records – page 1 of 25.