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Ambient temperature and neck EMG with +Gz loading on a trampoline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162975
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Roope Sovelius
Juha Oksa
Harri Rintala
Heini Huhtala
Simo Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Training Air Wing, P.O. Box 5, FIN-62201 Kauhava, Finland. roope.sovelius@mil.fi
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Electromyography
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypergravity
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Tonus - physiology
Neck Muscles - injuries - physiopathology
Seasons
Skin Temperature - physiology
Abstract
Fighter pilots who are frequently exposed to severe cold ambient temperatures experience neck pain disabilities and occupational disorders more often than those who are not so exposed. We hypothesized that a cold-induced increase in muscle strain might lead to in-flight neck injuries. The aims of this study were to measure the level of cooling before takeoff and to determine muscle strain under Gz loading (0 to +4 Gz) at different temperatures.
Test subjects' (n = 14) skin temperature (T(skin)) over the trapezoids was measured before the walk to the aircraft and again in the cockpit (air temperature -14 degrees C). The subjects then performed trampoline exercises in two different ambient temperatures (-2 degrees C and +21 degrees C) after a 30-min period at the respective temperatures. EMG activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), cervical erector spinae (CES), trapezoid (TRA), thoracic erector spinae (TES) muscles, and Tskin of the SCM and TRA were measured.
Tskin over the trapezoids decreased from 30.1 +/- 1.7 degrees C to 27.8 +/- 2.6 degrees C (p
PubMed ID
17571657 View in PubMed
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Autonomic nervous system and adaptation to cold in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1448
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1975 Aug; 39(2):181-186.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
J. LeBlanc
S. Dulac
J. C�??�?�´t�??�?�©
B. Girard
Author Affiliation
Laval University
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1975 Aug; 39(2):181-186.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Autonomic response
Cold hand test
Cold face test
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Blood pressure
Cheek - physiology
Child
Cold
Face - physiology
Female
Hand - physiology
Heart rate
Humans
Inuits
Male
Skin temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
The responses to cold hand test (blood pressure increase and tachycardia) and to a cold face test (blood pressure increase and bradycardia) were used to study the role of the autonomic nevrous system in cold adaptation in humans. The Eskimos (men, women, children) were shown to have a very weak sympathetic response to cold but the vagal response (bradycardia) was identical to that of white people. A group of mailmen from Quebec city living outdoors approximately 30 h/wk throughout the year was also studied. A significant decline in the cold pressor response and an enhanced bradycardia (cold face test) were observed at the end of the winter. Similarly the fall in skin temperature of the cheek was not as pronounced when the measurements were made in May compared to those made in October. A group of soldiers was also studied before and after an Arctic expedition. It was found that the bradycardia of the cold face test was also more pronounced after sojourning in the cold. These results indicate that repeated exposures to severe cold in men activate some adaptive mechanisms characterized by a diminution of the sympathetic response and a concomitant enhancement of the vagal activation normally observed when the extremities and the face are exposed to cold.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1033.
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Bat (Vespertilionidae) hibernation in the northeasternmost part of their geographic range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57242
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2003 Sep-Oct;392:413-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Anufriev
T N Solomonova
G G Arkhipov
A A Turpanov
N G Solomonov
Author Affiliation
Institute of the Biological Problems of Cryolite Zone, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Lenina 41, Yakutsk, 677891 Russia.
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2003 Sep-Oct;392:413-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Temperature - physiology
Chiroptera - physiology
Hibernation - physiology
Hypothermia - metabolism
Motor Activity - physiology
Periodicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Skin Temperature - physiology
Temperature
Time Factors
PubMed ID
14650872 View in PubMed
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Biportal thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141818
Source
J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2010 Aug;6(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Scott D Wait
Brendan D Killory
Gregory P Lekovic
Curtis A Dickman
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurological Surgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. neuropub@chw.edu
Source
J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2010 Aug;6(2):183-7
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Electrocoagulation - instrumentation
Female
Hand - innervation
Heart Arrest - etiology
Humans
Hyperhidrosis - genetics - surgery
Intraoperative Complications - etiology
Male
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Prospective Studies
Skin Temperature - physiology
Sweating - physiology
Sympathectomy - instrumentation - methods
Thoracoscopes
Thoracoscopy - methods
Abstract
Palmar, axillary, and plantar hyperhidrosis is often socially, emotionally, and physically disabling for adolescents. The authors report surgical outcomes in all adolescents treated for palmar hyperhidrosis via bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy at the Barrow Neurological Institute by the senior author.
A prospectively maintained database of all adolescent patients undergoing bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy between 1998 and 2006 (inclusive) was reviewed. Additional follow-up was obtained as needed in clinic or by phone or written questionnaire.
Fifty-four patients (40 females) undergoing bilateral procedures were identified. Their mean age was 15.4 years (range 10-17 years). Average follow-up was 42 weeks (range 0.2-143 weeks). Hyperhidrosis involved the palms alone in 10 patients; the palms and axilla in 6 patients; the palms and plantar surfaces in 17 patients; and the palms, axilla, and plantar surfaces in 21 patients. Palmar hyperhidrosis resolved completely in 98.1% of the patients. Resolution or improvement of symptoms was seen in 96.3% of patients with axillary and 71.1% of those with plantar hyperhidrosis. Hospital stay averaged 0.37 days with 68.5% of patients discharged the day of surgery. One patient experienced brief intraoperative asystole that resolved with medications and had no long-term sequelae. Otherwise, no serious intraoperative complications occurred. No patient required chest tube drainage. The percentage of patients who reported satisfaction and willingness to undergo the procedure again was 98.1%.
Biportal, bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective and low-morbidity treatment for severe palmar, axillary, and plantar hyperhidrosis.
PubMed ID
20672941 View in PubMed
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Calculation of mean skin temperature and changes in body heat content during paediatric anaesthesia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35802
Source
Br J Anaesth. 1994 May;72(5):548-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
K. Puhakka
H. Anttonen
J. Niskanen
P. Ryhänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Anaesth. 1994 May;72(5):548-53
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, General
Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Mathematics
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Temperature - physiology
Abstract
Mean skin temperature and changes in body heat content were calculated in several different ways from measurements made in five children during operation. Mean skin temperatures were calculated from 162 sets of measurements using 15, 12, eight, seven and four skin sites with various formulae modified according to age. The results of other formulae were compared with age-adjusted, area-weighted 15-site mean skin temperature which was used as a reference. Changes in body heat content were calculated from Burton's equation in different ways and errors from different variables in the formula were evaluated. Mean skin temperature from 12 skin sites was within 0.5 degrees C of the 15-point reference method, and that from four sites within 1 degree C. The core temperature selected and the weighting coefficients used in calculating mean body temperature were more important sources of error in the determination of change in body heat content than was mean skin temperature.
PubMed ID
8198907 View in PubMed
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Central and peripheral thermoreceptors. Comparative analysis of the effects of prolonged adaptation to cold and noradrenaline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79329
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2007 Feb;37(2):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Kozyreva T V
Author Affiliation
Thermophysiology Laboratory, State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia. kozyreva@iph.ma.nsc.ru
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2007 Feb;37(2):191-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Action Potentials - drug effects - physiology - radiation effects
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Animals
Cold
Functional Laterality
Neurons - drug effects - physiology - radiation effects
Norepinephrine - pharmacology
Preoptic Area - cytology
Skin Temperature - drug effects - physiology - radiation effects
Thermoreceptors - physiology
Abstract
This report presents results obtained from many years of study of the effects of prolonged adaptation to cold and noradrenaline on the spike activity of central hypothalamic and peripheral skin thermoreceptors. The involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in forming adaptive changes in the regulatory characteristics of temperature homeostasis and the significance of the various components of thermoreceptor activity to the formation of effector responses are discussed. The roles of different groups of thermoreceptors in forming temperature sensations are analyzed.
PubMed ID
17187211 View in PubMed
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Changes in cold-induced vasodilation during Arctic exercises.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251290
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1976 Mar;40(3):455-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1976
Author
S D Livingstone
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1976 Mar;40(3):455-7
Date
Mar-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Body Temperature Regulation
Canada
Cold Climate
Cold Temperature
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Male
Military Medicine
Skin - blood supply
Skin temperature
Vasomotor System - physiology
Abstract
The effect of exposure to cold on cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) was examined in military personnel who had experienced a 2-wk stay in the Artic. During this time, the daily regimen consisted of long marches over difficult terrain and sleep in unheated tents with diurnal temperatures ranging from -10 to -40 degrees C. In tests conducted before and after the 2-wk period, CIVD was measured in the left middle finger of each subject by its immersion in ice water. After the 2-wk period, the value of mean finger temperature during the test had decreased relative to that observed before the test, the time required before the first vasodilative temperature increase occurred had become greater, and the finger temperature value at which the vasodilative increase was initiated has been lowered. These changes manifest a deleterious effect of cold exposure on the CIVD, contrary to expectations, and suggest that the effect of short-term cold exposure is to produce a general rather than peripheral acclimation in these subjects.
PubMed ID
931863 View in PubMed
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Changes in peripheral circulation with exercise training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature759
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory, Ladd Air Force Base. Technical Report 59-16. 110 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1960
Author
Elsner, R.W.
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory, Ladd Air Force Base. Technical Report 59-16. 110 pp.
Date
1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anaktuvuk Pass
Oxygen consumption
Heart rate
Skin temperature
Body temperature
Blood flow
Cardiac output
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1060.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 165.
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[Characteristics of the functional state and body heat exchange in children of the indigenous population of Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40059
Source
Gig Sanit. 1983 Sep;(9):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983

138 records – page 1 of 14.