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12-year data on dermatologic cases in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases I: Distribution of different diagnoses and main causes of allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311045
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):337-342
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Unit, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):337-342
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acrylates - adverse effects
Adult
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Compounds - adverse effects
Epoxy Resins - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Isocyanates - adverse effects
Male
Metals - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Registries
Rubber - adverse effects
Skin Diseases, Infectious - epidemiology
Thiazoles - adverse effects
Urticaria - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin diseases are among the most common occupational diseases, but detailed analyses on their epidemiology, diagnoses, and causes are relatively scarce.
To analyze data on skin disease in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD) for (1) different diagnoses and (2) main causes of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD).
We retrieved data on recognized cases with occupational skin disease (OSD) in the FROD from a 12-year-period 2005-2016 and used national official labor force data of the year 2012.
We analyzed a total of 5265 cases, of which 42% had irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), 35% ACD, 11% contact urticaria/protein contact dermatitis (CU/PCD), and 9% skin infections. The incidence rate of OSD in the total labor force was 18.8 cases/100 000 person years. Skin infections concerned mainly scabies in health care personnel. Twenty-nine per cent of the ACD cases were caused by plastics/resins-related allergens, mainly epoxy chemicals. Other important causes for ACD were rubber, preservatives, metals, acrylates, and hairdressing chemicals. Cases of occupational ACD due to isothiazolinones reached a peak in 2014.
Our analysis confirms that epoxy products are gaining importance as causes of OSD and the isothiazolinone contact allergy epidemic has started to wane.
PubMed ID
32037572 View in PubMed
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A 13-year survey of bacteraemia due to beta-haemolytic streptococci in a Danish county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35255
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1995 Jul;43(1):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
B. Kristensen
H C Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1995 Jul;43(1):63-7
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Female
Hemolysis
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus - classification - isolation & purification
Streptococcus agalactiae - classification - isolation & purification
Streptococcus pyogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Abstract
During 1981-1993, 229 episodes of bacteraemia due to beta-haemolytic streptococci of groups A, B, C and G were diagnosed in the County of Northern Jutland, Denmark. The annual rates for bacteraemia were quite constant during the 13-year period for each streptococcal group. Group A streptococcal (GAS) bacteraemia was the most frequent, comprising 1.4% of all bacteraemias. The incidence of GAS bacteraemia was 1.8/100,000/year in children 60 years old. With the notable exception of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteraemia in neonates, beta-haemolytic streptococci of groups B, C (GCS) and G (GGS) were isolated mostly from elderly patients. Except for GBS bacteraemia in neonates, approximately one-third of the bacteraemias in each group was nosocomially acquired. Predisposing factors included operative procedures in GAS and GCS bacteraemia, and diabetes mellitus in GBS bacteraemia. The skin was the most common primary focus in GAC, GCC and GGS bacteraemias, whereas the urinary tract was the commonest focus in GBS bacteraemia in adults. The mortality rates in GAS, GCS, GGS, and adult GBS bacteraemia were 23%, 16%, 17% and 19%, respectively. Of the 23 fatal cases of GAS bacteraemia, 57% died within 24 h after blood cultures had been obtained.
PubMed ID
7608958 View in PubMed
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24th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278271
Source
Immunotherapy. 2016;8(4):395-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2016
Author
Anja C Rasch
Source
Immunotherapy. 2016;8(4):395-7
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Dermatologists
Dermatology - trends
Europe
Humans
Skin Diseases - immunology
Societies, Scientific
Venereology - trends
Abstract
The 24th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 7-11 October 2015. It has become Europe's biggest meeting of its kind with roughly 10,000 participants, approximately 3000 abstracts and about 180 exhibitors from all over the world. The organizers offer a venue for the latest cutting edge research and newest developments. Thus, their goal is to foster progress in clinical care and promote scientific excellence related to dermatovenereology for the benefit of patients with skin diseases.
PubMed ID
26973121 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up study of drug addicts hospitalised for acute hepatitis: present and past morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7324
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanne Rogne Gjeruldsen
Bjørn Myrvang
Stein Opjordsmoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. s.m.r.gieruldsen@iwoks.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Environment
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate present and past morbidity in drug addicts, 25 years after hospitalisation for acute hepatitis B or hepatitis nonA-nonB. The hospital records for 214 consecutively admitted patients were analysed, and a follow-up study on 66 of the 144 patients still alive was performed. At follow-up, 1 of 54 (1.8%) hepatitis B patients was still HBsAg positive. Twelve patients originally diagnosed as hepatitis nonA-nonB were all among 54 found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) positive, and the total anti-HCV prevalence was 81.8%. Twelve (22.2%) of the HCV cases were unknown before the follow-up examination. Four (6.1%) participants were anti-human immunodeficiency virus positive, only 1 was on antiretroviral therapy, and none had developed AIDS. Other chronic somatic diseases were a minor problem, whereas drug users reported skin infections as a frequent complication. Forty-three patients (65%) had abandoned addictive drugs since the hospital stay. Serious mental disorders were reported by 19 patients (28.8%), and 17 (25.8%) regarded themselves as present (9) and former (8) compulsive alcohol drinkers. A large proportion of the participants were granted disability pension (39%), a majority because of psychiatric disorders, drug and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
12644734 View in PubMed
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[40 years of dermato-venereological service in the Arkhangelsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111633
Source
Vestn Dermatol Venerol. 1966 Nov;40(11):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1966
Author
I A Lipskii
A I Padun
Source
Vestn Dermatol Venerol. 1966 Nov;40(11):63-6
Date
Nov-1966
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Humans
Russia
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - therapy
Skin Diseases - therapy
PubMed ID
4237116 View in PubMed
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[50 years of research work in the therapy of skin diseases and syphilis at the faculty of dermatology and venereology of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111016
Source
Cesk Dermatol. 1967 Dec;42(6):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1967
Author
V A Rachmanov
Source
Cesk Dermatol. 1967 Dec;42(6):361-7
Date
Dec-1967
Language
Czech
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dermatology - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Moscow
Skin Diseases - drug therapy
Syphilis - drug therapy
PubMed ID
4870582 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About experiment on decrease of dermatovenerological disease incidence among servicemen of Northern Caucasian Military District].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169040
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2006 Feb;327(2):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006

[Achievements in the control of dermatologic and venereal diseases in Yamal (40th anniversary of the formation of the Yamal-Nenets National Region)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256239
Source
Vestn Dermatol Venerol. 1971 Jun;45(6):61-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971
Author
N A Belonogova
P T Moskovkin
Source
Vestn Dermatol Venerol. 1971 Jun;45(6):61-3
Date
Jun-1971
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
Siberia
Skin Diseases - prevention & control
PubMed ID
5171644 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
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486 records – page 1 of 49.