Skip header and navigation

Refine By

503 records – page 1 of 51.

A 1-year, placebo-controlled, double-blind house-dust-mite immunotherapy study in asthmatic adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15782
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
O T Olsen
K R Larsen
L. Jacobsan
U G Svendsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonery Medicine and Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Double-Blind Method
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glycoproteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - blood - immunology
Immunotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Steroids - therapeutic use
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Thirty-one adult patients with asthma caused by house-dust mites (HDM) were included in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of specific immunotherapy (SIT) with biologically standardized extracts of HDM. The specific diagnosis was confirmed by skin prick tests, specific IgE, and bronchial provocation tests with HDM allergens. The patients were randomized to receive active treatment with extracts of either Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) or D. farinae (Dfa) (Alutard SQ, ALK, Denmark) or placebo injections. Twenty-three patients completed the study. After 1 year of treatment, we found a clinically important and significant reduction in both asthma medicine consumption (inhaled steroids 38% and beta 2-agonists 46%) and symptom score (57%) in the actively treated group, but not the placebo group. These findings were confirmed by a significant decrease in skin and bronchial sensitivity to HDM in the active group. Additionally, there was a significant difference in the patients' scores for effect in favor of the actively treated group. Total IgE and specific IgE to HDM showed no significant changes before and after treatment for either group. Spirometric lung-function measurements showed a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from 85% before to 89% of predicted values after treatment for the actively treated group. Peak-flow measurements at home showed no significant changes during the study. It is concluded that allergen SIT is an effective treatment in adult patients suffering from asthma due to HDM.
PubMed ID
9284985 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year prognosis for childhood allergic rhinitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16062
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):100-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
O. Linna
J. Kokkonen
M. Lukin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):100-2
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - diagnostic use
Asthma - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Risk factors
Seasons
Skin Tests - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
The prognosis of allergic rhinitis was studied in 154 children aged 3-17 years at diagnosis by means of a detailed questionnaire administered 8-11 years later. The symptoms had completely disappeared in only 15 (10%) patients. The conjunctival symptoms, however, had disappeared or were controlled successfully by topical drug therapy in almost all, and 77 (50%) were managing without medication for allergic rhinitis. Twenty-five (23%) of the 110 children with seasonal allergic rhinitis had a perennial disease at follow-up, in contrast to seven (16%) of 44 with perennial allergic rhinitis originally who had only seasonal symptoms at follow-up. Asthma or wheezing had developed in 29 cases (19%) and was more common (p less than 0.01) among those with perennial allergic rhinitis (15 of 44) than among those with seasonal allergic rhinitis (14 of 110). No significant association was found between age at onset of symptoms, family history of atopic disease or type of treatment for allergic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis still present at follow-up or development of asthma during the observation period.
PubMed ID
1515750 View in PubMed
Less detail

1976 Davis & Geck surgical essay. The delayed hypersensitivity response: clinical application in surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250317
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
J B Pietsch
J L Meakins
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):15-21
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Delayed
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - mortality
Quebec
Sepsis - diagnosis
Skin Tests
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Surgical Wound Infection - diagnosis
Abstract
The detection of anergy or relative anergy by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests was predictive of infection and related mortality in 354 surgical patients. Cancer or advanced age alone did not account for the increased morbidity and mortality seen in this study. Altered delayed hypersensitivity response is a reflection of abnormalities in cell-mediated immunity and possibly humoral or phagocytic defects, or both. Skin testing is of value to the clinical surgeon both in identifying the population at risk and in monitoring the immune response to therapy in the seriously ill patient. Failure to improve skin-test response may indicate underlying infection or malnutrition, which, if untreated, results in a high mortality.
PubMed ID
832199 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of the atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme in Saskatchewan Cree Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221601
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Dyck
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Flushing - etiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Hair - enzymology
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - genetics
Mitochondria - enzymology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Abstract
Three methods were employed to assess whether human volunteers (Caucasian, Asian or Cree Indian) possessed the typical or atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme. These methods were: (1) questioning individuals about facial flushing responses following alcohol consumption; (2) application of the ethanol skin patch test, and (3) direct analysis using isoelectric focusing and activity staining of ALDH activity in hair root samples. The results from the three methods were in good agreement and revealed that only the typical ALDH2 isozyme was expressed in Saskatchewan Cree Indians. In agreement with previous reports, the typical ALDH2 was expressed in the Caucasian group of subjects, while both the typical and atypical forms were expressed in the Asian subjects.
PubMed ID
8359813 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237190
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
J. Manfreda
V. Holford-Strevens
M. Cheang
C P Warren
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Farmer's Lung - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Skin Tests
Smoking
Abstract
History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1966 Apr;23(2):149-525929689
Cites: J Occup Med. 1964 Aug;6:319-2914178791
Cites: Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1966 Dec;10(12):11-56000496
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1973 Aug;27(2):74-74198462
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1974 Mar;53(3):139-494813889
Cites: Clin Allergy. 1976 May;6(3):241-50939037
Cites: Thorax. 1976 Jun;31(3):294-302941115
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 Nov;114(5):1011-9988767
Cites: Clin Allergy. 1977 May;7(3):227-33561668
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1978 Mar;39(3):177-94645544
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Feb;119(2):193-203434592
Cites: Chest. 1979 Apr;75(4):461-7446134
Cites: J Occup Med. 1964 Sep;6:359-7214205649
Cites: Lancet. 1979 Dec 22-29;2(8156-8157):1330-292674
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1980 Feb;121(2):329-387362139
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Jun 7;122(11):1259-647388722
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1977 Jun;115(6):915-27262104
Cites: Chest. 1982 Jan;81(1):55-616797794
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1982 Apr;69(4):370-57069072
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1983 Jan;50(1):30-36849517
Cites: Eur J Respir Dis. 1983 Apr;64(3):189-966840232
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1984 Apr;73(4):516-226707394
Cites: Psychol Med. 1984 May;14(2):315-256547535
Cites: J Allergy. 1953 May;24(3):193-21113052357
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1968 Mar;16(3):380-44230718
PubMed ID
3709486 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant-induced arthritis in four inbred strains of rats. An in vitro study of peripheral T and B lymphocytes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14754
Source
Agents Actions. 1976 Feb;6(1-3):219-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1976
Author
A. Kahan
F. Perlik
A. Le Go
F. Delbarre
J P Giroud
Source
Agents Actions. 1976 Feb;6(1-3):219-27
Date
Feb-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - immunology
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
Freund's Adjuvant
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mitogens - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Skin Tests
Species Specificity
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
The lymphoblastic response (LTT) to non-specific mitogens (PHA, PWM and ConA) of peripheral lymphocytes was investigated at days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after adjuvant injection in four strains of inbred rats: Wistar (WAG), Long Evans (LE), Lewis (LEW) and Brown Norway (BN). LTT was assessed by using 18 hours H3 TdR incorporation in 5 days cultures of whole blood (micromethod). The statistical treatment of data, using principal components multifactorial analysis and analysis of variance showed a striking difference between strains. In control animals the responses to PHA and PWM were correlated and were higher in LE and WAG than in LEW and BN (BN=LEW less than LE=WAG). The response to ConA was independent of that to the other mitogens. It was generally low, but significantly higher in LEW and BN than in WAG and LE. In adjuvant-injected animals the responses to PHA and PWM were still correlated, but modified compared to control: in LE and LEW, but not in WAG and BN, a marked decrease of the response was found, reaching a minimum value within days 7 and 14. In the same time the response to ConA increased in the four strains, later in LE than in the others. However the intensity of the ConA response varied from one strain to another: it was constantly low in LE and WAG compared to LEW and BN. So the most striking modification of LTT were observed in LE and LEW, which both developed the most severe arthritis. However these different behaviours after adjuvant injection were not explained by the initial level of LTT to the different mitogens. These data suggest that the development of intense arthritis is associated with the proliferation and the release into the blood stream of a lymphocyte subpopulation, which exhibits a low response to PHA and PWM and a high response to ConA. These LTT modifications are not paralleled by quantitative variations of B-cells assessed by surface Ig immunofluorescent staining and EAC rosetting.
PubMed ID
1085095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advances in upper airway diseases and allergen immunotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186402
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Harold S Nelson
Author Affiliation
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Sublingual
Administration, Topical
Allergens - administration & dosage - chemistry
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Asthma - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Immunization - methods
Liposomes
Oligonucleotides - chemistry
Rhinitis - pathology - therapy
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies continue to find an increased prevalence of rhinitis, asthma, and atopy in more westernized countries. Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are risk factors for development of asthma, particularly in adulthood. In patients who have both asthma and rhinitis, treatment of the latter decreases the likelihood of emergency department visits or hospitalization for asthma. The protective effect of intranasal cortico-steroids is much greater than that of antihistamines. This mirrors the effect on rhinitis symptoms, in which nasal corticosteroids are much more effective than antihistamines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, or the combination of both. In patients with severe asthma, sinus mucosal thickening on computed tomography (CT) correlates with the severity of lower airway disease indicated by sputum eosinophilia, exhaled nitrous oxide (NO), functional residual capacity, and diffusing capacity. Preseasonal specific immunotherapy (SIT) is less effective, but additive to treatment with omalizumab. It is also somewhat less effective in reducing nasal symptoms than nasal corticosteroids; however, it is superior to them for reducing lower airway inflammation. SIT in children with only allergic rhinitis reduces both the incidence of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. High-dose sublingual immunotherapy appears to be safe and effective, but less effective than injection immunotherapy. It is not clear that there are cost savings with sublingual immunotherapy, as home administration savings may be offset by the much larger amount of allergen extracts required. New approaches to allergen immunotherapy, designed to increase efficacy and safety, include conjugation of allergens to immunostimulatory sequences and encapsulation in liposomes. Cross-reactivity between inhalants and foods demonstrated by skin prick tests is more predictive of clinically important sensitivity than is that demonstrated by RAST testing. The latter, because of cross-reacting profilins, is often clinically irrelevant.
PubMed ID
12618745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176079
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Elberling
A. Linneberg
H. Mosbech
A. Dirksen
T. Menné
N H Nielsen
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
J Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. jeel@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend
PubMed ID
15725282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air-borne fungi and respiratory allergy: a Montreal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110432
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Nov 2;99(17):827-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1968
Author
W P Warren
B. Rose
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Nov 2;99(17):827-31
Date
Nov-2-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Allergens
Asthma - etiology
Bronchitis - etiology
Canada
Fungi
Humans
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - etiology - microbiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Sinusitis - etiology
Skin Tests
Notes
Cites: J Allergy. 1953 Jul;24(4):348-5413061195
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1962 Dec 22;87:1310-314028235
Cites: J Pathol Bacteriol. 1964 Jul;88:141-5114194971
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1964 Nov;22:575-8714227993
PubMed ID
5685887 View in PubMed
Less detail

503 records – page 1 of 51.