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85 records – page 1 of 9.

A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106960
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Luise Winkel Idorn
Pameli Datta
Jakob Heydenreich
Peter Alshede Philipsen
Hans Christian Wulf
Author Affiliation
Dermatological Research Department D92, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.
PubMed ID
24080851 View in PubMed
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[A consensus statement for the prevention of melanoma. Changes in sunbathing habits are most important. Tanning salons are too popular among young people].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216688
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Dec 14;91(50):4778-82
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-14-1994

[Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, Kaposi's disease and cerebral toxoplasmosis in a young man. Review of the literature apropos of a case]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8813
Source
Ann Dermatol Venereol. 1984;111(1):11-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
M. Janier
A M Perroud
J. Revuz
J. Wechsler
M. Feuilhade
J. Poirier
J P Caron
R. Touraine
Source
Ann Dermatol Venereol. 1984;111(1):11-23
Date
1984
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Brain Diseases - etiology
English Abstract
France
Homosexuality
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Male
Sarcoma, Kaposi - etiology
Skin Neoplasms - etiology
Toxoplasmosis - etiology
United States
Virus Diseases - immunology
Abstract
We report a new case of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in a 43 year-old white homosexual man, characterized by the association of disseminated cutaneo-mucous Kaposi's sarcoma and cerebral toxoplasmosis. This man had Kaposi's sarcoma for about 10 years but evolution became quickly extensive in July 1981. Chlorambucil was prescribed at that time and was the cause of a pancytopenia. Death occurred in July 1982 due to a cerebral mass identified as toxoplasmosis on a left temporal biopsy. This observation is typical of AIDS, a new syndrome which suddenly developed in the last 2 years in the United States in homosexual men, Haitians and hemophiliacs, and is characterized by disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma and/or opportunistic infections, with a very high mortality rate. Severe toxoplasmosis of CNS has been reported in AIDS and appears to result from defects in cellular immunity which permit recrudescence of latent infection. Cerebral biopsy is necessary for the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis as seroconversion occurs infrequently in immuno-suppressed hosts. AIDS appeared in Western Europe in 1982. Most of the cases were reported in France, Denmark, Belgium and Great Britain. These cases differ from reported cases in the USA: fewer drug or poppers users, fewer homosexual men, an important number of people having lived or travelled in the Kaposi's endemic area (Mediterranean basin and Central Africa). The immunological profile of patients presenting AIDS in Europe doesn't seem to differ from the american profile: serious cellular immunodeficiency and marked increase in the suppressor/cytotoxic cell population. As in the United States, one may suspect, among several hypotheses, that it is caused by one or several transmissible agents now present in France. The nature of these agents, transmissible by sexual contacts and blood, is not yet known: the role of the CMV is now less probable and most of the studies look for the role of other factors such as the HTLV.
PubMed ID
6375520 View in PubMed
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Actinic keratosis: a cross-sectional study of disease characteristics and treatment patterns in Danish dermatology clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279478
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Andrés M Erlendsson
Henrik Egekvist
Henrik F Lorentzen
Peter A Philipsen
Birgitte Stausbøl-Grøn
Ida M Stender
Merete Haedersdal
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminolevulinic Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Aminoquinolines - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cryotherapy - utilization
Denmark
Dermatology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Keratosis, Actinic - complications - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Photochemotherapy - utilization
Photosensitizing Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The incidence of actinic keratosis (AK) is increasing, and several treatment options are available. The aim of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in patients with AK treated by Danish dermatologists.
A multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional study was conducted. Three dermatology hospital departments and seven private dermatology clinics enrolled eligible AK patients consecutively during one week.
A total of 312 patients were included. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was previously reported in 51.0% of patients and currently suspected in 9.4% of AK-affected anatomical regions. Lesions of AK were located primarily on the face (38.6%), scalp (12.8%), and hands (11.2%). Actinic keratosis commonly presented with multiple AK lesions (38.6%) and field cancerization (38.5%). The treatments used most frequently were cryotherapy (57.7%) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolevulinate (17.1%) and imiquimod (11.2%). The likelihood of receiving cryotherapy was higher for men (odds ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-2.47) and increased with age (2.2% per year, 0.4-4.0%). PDT represented the most frequently applied treatment for severe actinic damage and was more likely to be prescribed to women (OR 4.08, 95% CI 2.22-7.47) and young patients (OR 0.97 per year, 95% CI 0.95-0.99). The prevalence of severe actinic damage (17.3% versus 9.6%) and intake of immunosuppressive medication (29.0 versus 2.0) were higher among hospital patients compared with those treated in private practices (P 
PubMed ID
26276415 View in PubMed
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Association of cutaneous malignant melanoma with intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation: results of a case-control study in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201487
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun;28(3):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
S D Walter
W D King
L D Marrett
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. walter@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Jun;28(3):418-27
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Skin Neoplasms - etiology
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
Although solar radiation is well established as a risk factor for melanoma, it is less clear how the pattern and timing of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation might be important. The particular objective of this study was to evaluate the association of melanoma risk with various measures of intermittent and chronic exposures to UV radiation, and to assess how these exposures interact with other risk factors such as skin type.
Data were analysed from a large case-control study (583 cases, 608 controls) of malignant melanoma, carried out in southern Ontario, Canada.
Significant risk increases were identified with several measures of intermittent exposure, including beach vacations in adolescence and in the past 5 years, previous sunburn, and use of sunbeds and sunlamps. Chronic exposure, indicated by days of outdoor activity during adolescence and by occupation in recent adult life, was associated with significantly reduced risk. Subgroup analyses showed: no major risk differences by body site of melanoma; stronger association of lentigo maligna melanoma with intermittent exposure; more pronounced effects of beach vacations and sunburn in younger subjects; and consistently higher risks for intermittent exposures among subjects with skin more susceptible to burning.
The data lend limited support to the hypothesis of increased risk associated with intermittent UV exposure. The findings suggest that future studies should take age at diagnosis, host susceptibility and histological subtype into account.
PubMed ID
10405843 View in PubMed
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Avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor for all-cause mortality: results from the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103089
Source
J Intern Med. 2014 Jul;276(1):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
P G Lindqvist
E. Epstein
M. Landin-Olsson
C. Ingvar
K. Nielsen
M. Stenbeck
H. Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clintec, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2014 Jul;276(1):77-86
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Melanoma - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Socioeconomic Factors
Sunbathing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sunlight - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - metabolism
Abstract
Sunlight exposure and fair skin are major determinants of human vitamin D production, but they are also risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM). There is epidemiological evidence that all-cause mortality is related to low vitamin D levels.
We assessed the avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for all-cause mortality for 29 518 Swedish women in a prospective 20-year follow-up of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden (MISS) cohort. Women were recruited from 1990 to 1992 and were aged 25 to 64 years at the start of the study. We obtained detailed information at baseline on their sun exposure habits and potential confounders. Multivariable flexible parametric survival analysis was applied to the data.
There were 2545 deaths amongst the 29 518 women who responded to the initial questionnaire. We found that all-cause mortality was inversely related to sun exposure habits. The mortality rate amongst avoiders of sun exposure was approximately twofold higher compared with the highest sun exposure group, resulting in excess mortality with a population attributable risk of 3%.
The results of this study provide observational evidence that avoiding sun exposure is a risk factor for all-cause mortality. Following sun exposure advice that is very restrictive in countries with low solar intensity might in fact be harmful to women's health.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2014 Jul;276(1):71-324697849
PubMed ID
24697969 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Finnish psoriasis patients treated with 8-methoxypsoralen bath PUVA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21046
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 May;40(5 Pt 1):694-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
A. Hannuksela-Svahn
E. Pukkala
L. Koulu
C T Jansén
J. Karvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 May;40(5 Pt 1):694-6
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Baths
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - etiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Melanoma - etiology
Methoxsalen - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
PUVA Therapy
Photosensitizing Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Psoriasis - drug therapy
Radiation Dosage
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long-term oral 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and UVA (PUVA) therapy increases the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer and possibly also of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Topical application of 8-MOP PUVA induces malignant tumors in rodent skin, but little is known about its carcinogenicity in human skin. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to investigate the carcinogenicity of 8-MOP bath PUVA in humans. METHODS: This was a cohort study of 158 patients with psoriasis, for whom 8-MOP bath PUVA had been initiated during 1979 to 1992. The average number of 8-MOP bath PUVA treatments was 36 (range, 6 to 204) and the mean cumulative UVA dose was 92 J/cm2 (range, 3 to 884 J/cm2) by the end of 1995. The patients were not treated with any other forms of PUVA. Cancer incidence subsequent to 8-MOP bath PUVA up to the end of 1995 was determined by linking the cohort with the records of the Finnish Cancer Registry. The standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for skin cancer and some common internal cancers, using the expected numbers of cases based on the regional cancer incidence rates. RESULTS: There was one case of basal cell carcinoma, but no cases of other types of skin cancer. A total of 6 noncutaneous cancers were observed (SIR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 2.8). CONCLUSION: No association between cutaneous cancer and 8-MOP bath PUVA was found, but the statistical power of this study alone is not adequate to warrant definite conclusions. The results can be used in a meta-analysis as soon as other studies on the carcinogenicity of 8-MOP bath PUVA are published.
PubMed ID
10321595 View in PubMed
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CHEK2*1100delC and risk of malignant melanoma: Danish and German studies and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130903
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2012 Feb;132(2):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Maren Weischer
Ida M Heerfordt
Stig E Bojesen
Thomas Eigentler
Claus Garbe
Martin Röcken
Lisbet Rosenkrantz Hölmich
Henrik Schmidt
Helle Klyver
Lars Bastholt
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2012 Feb;132(2):299-303
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Checkpoint Kinase 2
Denmark
Female
Germany
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - genetics
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 1 - genetics
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Abstract
It is possible that reduced function of DNA repair and cell-cycle control genes increases the individual susceptibility to malignant melanoma. As CHEK2 is a cell-cycle master controller, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygosity for the frameshift alteration CHEK2*1100delC is associated with increased risk of malignant melanoma. First, we performed case-control studies of 1,152 Danish and 752 German individuals with malignant melanoma compared with 9,142 Danish and 3,718 German controls. Second, we performed a meta-analysis of CHEK2*1100delC and malignant melanoma, involving 2,619 cases and 17,481 controls. Third, we examined the risk of malignant melanoma associated with CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity in an analysis stratified for sun exposure, as well as for subtype and location on the body. The odds ratios for malignant melanoma for CHEK2(*)1100del heterozygotes compared with those for noncarriers were 2.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-3.91) in Danes, 1.42 (95% CI, 0.46-4.31) in Germans, and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.02-3.17) in Danes and Germans combined. In a meta-analysis, the odds ratio of malignant melanoma for CHEK2*1100delC heterozygotes compared with that for noncarriers was 1.81 (95% CI, 1.07-3.05). Stratifications did not alter these results. CHEK2*1100delC heterozygotes have a twofold risk of malignant melanoma compared with noncarriers.
PubMed ID
21956126 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.