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120 records – page 1 of 12.

[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric factors and cutaneous melanoma: Prospective data from the population-based Janus Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294448
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 02 15; 142(4):681-690
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Jo S Stenehjem
Marit B Veierød
Lill Tove Nilsen
Reza Ghiasvand
Bjørn Johnsen
Tom K Grimsrud
Ronnie Babigumira
Judith R Rees
Trude E Robsahm
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 02 15; 142(4):681-690
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body mass index
Body surface area
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ultraviolet Rays
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to prospectively examine risk of cutaneous melanoma (CM) according to measured anthropometric factors, adjusted for exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), in a large population-based cohort in Norway. The Janus Cohort, including 292,851 Norwegians recruited 1972-2003, was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and followed for CM through 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of CM with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Restricted cubic splines were incorporated into the Cox models to assess possible non-linear relationships. All analyses were adjusted for attained age, indicators of UVR exposure, education, and smoking status. During a mean follow-up of 27 years, 3,000 incident CM cases were identified. In men, CM risk was positively associated with body mass index, body surface area (BSA), height and weight (all ptrends ?
Notes
ErratumIn: Int J Cancer. 2018 Apr 1;142(7):E3 PMID 29417601
PubMed ID
28983909 View in PubMed
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Biological amplification factor for sunlight-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer at high latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25446
Source
Cancer Res. 1989 Sep 15;49(18):5207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1989
Author
J. Moan
A. Dahlback
T. Henriksen
K. Magnus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Cancer Res. 1989 Sep 15;49(18):5207-12
Date
Sep-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Demography
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Norway
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Data for the incidence of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin, registered for six regions of Norway during 10 years (1976-1985), were used to evaluate the biological amplification factor Ab for induction of these cancers by sunlight. Ab is the ratio of the increment in skin cancer production to the increment in causative sunlight exposure. Two different approximations were used for the action spectrum for carcinogenesis: an erythema action spectrum; and an action spectrum for mutagenesis of cells in the basal layer of the skin. These two fundamentally different approaches yielded Ab values that were similar to within about 10%: 2.1-2.3 for BCCs; and 1.6-1.8 for SCCs. Using a radiation amplification factor for ozone depletion of 0.8-1.1, we find that the total amplification factor for BCCs is within the range 1.6-2.1 and that that for SCCs is within the range 1.3-1.7 at northern latitudes of 60-70 degrees. Thus, an ozone depletion of 1% will result in an increase in the incidence of BCCs by 1.6-2.1% and of SCCs by 1.3-1.7%. There were no significant differences between the values for men and women. Neither was there any significant difference between Ab values found for skin commonly exposed to sunlight (face) and for skin sites normally covered by clothes and therefore receiving much lower exposures, in spite of the fact that the tumor density per unit skin area was a factor of 20 or more larger at the former sites. This observation, as well as the curves relating cancer incidence with annual exposure to carcinogenic sunlight, supports a power law relationship between cancer incidence and annual sun exposure. Sunlight appears to be the main cause of BCCs and SCCs even at the high latitudes of Northern Norway. All over, BCCs were found to be about 6 times more frequent than SCCs. The ratio of the incidence of BCCs to that of SCCs seemed to be independent of the latitude. Finally, BCCs were found to be equally frequent among men and women, while SCCs were found to be about twice as frequent among men as among women.
PubMed ID
2766289 View in PubMed
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Birth order, family size, and the risk of cancer in young and middle-aged adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19773
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1466-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
K. Hemminki
P. Mutanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1466-71
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Birth Order
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Databases, Factual
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the effects of birth order and family size on the risk of common cancers among offspring born over the period 1958-96. Some 1.38 million offspring up to age 55 years with 50.6 million person-years were included. Poisson regression analysis included age at diagnosis, birth cohort, socio-economic status and region of residence as other explanatory variables. The only significant associations were an increasing risk for breast cancer by birth order and a decreasing risk for melanoma by birth order and, particularly, by family size. When details of the women's own reproductive history were included in analysis, birth orders 5-17 showed a relative risk of 1.41. The effects on breast cancer may be mediated through increasing birth weight by birth order. For melanoma, socio-economic factors may be involved, such as limited affordability of sun tourism in large families. Testis cancer showed no significant effect and prostate cancer was excluded from analysis because of the small number of cases.
PubMed ID
11384095 View in PubMed
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Burn injuries and skin cancer: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86542
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2008;88(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lindelöf Bernt
Krynitz Britta
Granath Fredrik
Ekbom Anders
Author Affiliation
Unit of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. bernt.lindelof@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2008;88(1):20-2
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Burns - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Development of malignant tumours in chronic burn wounds or scars is extremely rare, but a frequently reported complication. Most of these tumours are squamous cell carcinoma and, more occasionally, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma are reported. The interval between the initial burn and the diagnosis of the tumour is usually long; 20-30 years or more. A large number of case reports and small series of selected patients have been published. Only one epidemiological study has been performed recently, but it could not confirm any increased risk. We conducted a historical cohort study to assess the risk of cancer in Swedish patients with burn injuries. Using the national Inpatient Registry we identified 37,095 patients who had been hospitalized for burn injuries. This cohort was linked with the Swedish Cancer Registry for a virtually complete follow-up with regard to cancer. The mean follow-up time was 16.4 years (range >0-39). The risk of developing any form of cancer was slightly increased: standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.16) based on 2227 patients with cancer. However, squamous cell carcinoma: SIR 0.88 (95% CI 0.70-1.09) and malignant melanoma: SIR 0.88 (95% CI 0.68-1.12) did not occur more often than expected. Also, in a subgroup of 12,783 patients who were followed for 20-39 years, no increased risk of skin cancer could be detected. This study does not support any casual association between burn injuries and a later risk of skin cancer.
PubMed ID
18176744 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among firefighters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105024
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Eero Pukkala
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Elisabete Weiderpass
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Pär Sparén
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies.
Data for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates.
A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and skin melanoma (SIR=1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.23), while there was almost no excess in the older ages. By contrast, an increased risk, mainly in ages of 70 years and higher, was observed for non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.76), multiple myeloma (SIR=1.69, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98).
Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms may partly explain these results.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Aug;71(8):525-624996680
PubMed ID
24510539 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in a cohort of Swedish chimney sweeps, 1958-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117177
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Sep;103(9):1708-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Christer Hogstedt
Catarina Jansson
Marcus Hugosson
Håkan Tinnerberg
Per Gustavsson
Author Affiliation
Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. christer.hogstedt@gmail.com
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Sep;103(9):1708-14
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Poisson Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Soot - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We examined cancer incidence in an expanded cohort of Swedish chimney sweeps.
We added male chimney sweep trade union members (1981-2006) to an earlier cohort (employed 1918-1980) and linked them to nationwide registers of cancer, causes of deaths, and total population. The total cohort (n = 6320) was followed from 1958 through 2006. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using the male Swedish population as reference. We estimated exposure as years of employment and analyzed for exposure-response associations by Poisson regression.
A total of 813 primary cancers were observed versus 626 expected (SIR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.21, 1.39). As in a previous follow-up, SIRs were significantly increased for cancer of the esophagus, liver, lung, bladder, and all hematopoietic cancer. New findings included significantly elevated SIRs for cancer of the colon, pleura, adenocarcinoma of the lung, and at unspecified sites. Total cancer and bladder cancer demonstrated positive exposure-response associations.
Exposure to soot and asbestos are likely causes of the observed cancer excesses, with contributions from adverse lifestyle factors. Preventive actions to control work exposures and promote healthier lifestyles are an important priority.
PubMed ID
23327283 View in PubMed
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120 records – page 1 of 12.