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476 records – page 1 of 48.

40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Actinic Keratosis Diagnosis and Increased Risk of Developing Skin Cancer: A 10-year Cohort Study of 17,651 Patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311024
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Ghassan Guorgis
Chris D Anderson
Johan Lyth
Magnus Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Keratosis, Actinic - diagnosis
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinic keratosis is the most common actinic lesion in fair-skinned populations. It is accepted as an indicator of actinic skin damage and as an occasional precursor of squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate, in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, the relative risk of developing skin cancer during a follow-up period of 10 years. This registry-based cohort study compared a cohort of 2,893 individuals in south-eastern Sweden, who were diagnosed with actinic keratosis during the period 2000 to 2004, with a matched-control cohort of 14,668 individuals without actinic keratosis during the same inclusion period. The subjects were followed for 10 years to identify skin cancer development in both cohorts. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used as risk measures. Individuals in the actinic keratosis cohort had a markedly higher risk for all skin cancer forms compared with the control cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 5.1, 95% CI 4.7-5.6). The relative risk was highest for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (HR 7.7, 95% CI 6.7-8.8) and somewhat lower for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (HR 4.4, 95% CI 4.1-5.0) and malignant melanoma (MM) (HR 2.7 (2.1-3.6). Patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis were found to be at increased risk of developing SCC, BCC and MM in the 10 years following diagnosis of actinic keratosis. In conclusion, a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, even in the absence of documentation of other features of chronic sun exposure, is a marker of increased risk of skin cancer, which should be addressed with individually directed preventive advice.
PubMed ID
32314794 View in PubMed
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Adjusting and comparing survival curves by means of an additive risk model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21578
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P H Zahl
O O Aalen
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo. perhz@biostat.washington.edu
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Survival curves may be adjusted for covariates using Aalen's additive risk model. Survival curves may be compared by taking the ratio of two adjusted survival curves; the ratio is denoted the generalized relative survival rate. Adjusting both survival curves for all but one of a common set of covariates gives the partial relative survival rate, which measures the covariate-specific contribution to the generalized relative survival rate. The generalized and partial relative survival rates have interpretations similar to the traditional relative survival rates frequently used in cancer epidemiology. In fact, the traditional relative survival rate can be generalized to a regression context using the additive risk model. This population-adjusted relative survival rate is an alternative and useful method for removing confounding effects of age, cohorts, and sex. The authors use a data set of malignant melanoma patients diagnosed from 1965 to 1974 in Norway. The 25-year survival of 1967 individuals is studied.
PubMed ID
9658773 View in PubMed
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[AGE FEATURES OF PREVALENCE, LOCALISATION AND CLINICAL COURSE OF SOME NODULAR-ULCER FORMS OF BASAL CELL SKIN CANCER OF FACE AND HEAD].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266600
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2015;28(1):140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S I Balakhonov
A K Iordanishvili
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2015;28(1):140-5
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Face
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prevalence
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Scalp
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
During carrying out clinical trial on the base of Leningrad regional clinical hospital the incidence of basal cell skin cancer of the face and scalp has been studied in adults of different age groups, as well as peculiarities of clinical course of this disease in elderly and senile age. The most commonly encountered clinical form of basal cell cancer of the face and scalp in the Leningrad region was nodular-ulcerative, which was diagnosed in clinical practice in 38.3% of cases. The features of clinical course of superficial, nodular and destruida forms in people of middle, elderly and senile age are given. It is shown that the highest frequency of occurence of these clinical forms were in age of 61-70 years.
PubMed ID
26390625 View in PubMed
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[Alarming increase in skin cancer. Doubled number of cases within 10 years, according to forecasts from southern Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256680
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Aug 6-19;111(32-33):1309-10
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of the risk of skin cancer from sunlight and solaria in subjects living in northern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235096
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B L Diffey
Author Affiliation
Regional Medical Physics Department, Dryburn Hospital, Durham, UK.
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Germany, West
Great Britain
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupations
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in northern Europeans who indulge in sunbathing or use a UVA solarium was estimated using a mathematical model of skin cancer incidence that makes allowance for childhood, occupational and recreational sun exposure. This model demonstrates that the cumulative incidence of skin cancer in indoor workers is about 2-3% by the age of 70, yet this risk can increase 5-fold if they indulge in a two-week sunbathing vacation each summer. The use of a UVA solarium is also shown to increase the risk of skin cancer. Because risk increases with the approximate square of annual solarium exposure, it is not possible to define a 'safe' level of exposure. Instead, it is shown that weekly use of a UVA solarium from age 20 until middle age (40-50) gives a relative cumulative incidence of 1.3 compared with non-users of sun beds and sun canopies. The risk begins to increase rapidly for more frequent use, particularly when solaria are used in combination with sunbathing.
PubMed ID
3684734 View in PubMed
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Anatomic distribution of acquired melanocytic nevi in white children. A comparison with melanoma: the Vancouver Mole Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229352
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1990 Apr;126(4):466-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
R P Gallagher
D I McLean
C P Yang
A J Coldman
H K Silver
J J Spinelli
M. Beagrie
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Biometry, and Occupational Oncology, Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1990 Apr;126(4):466-71
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body surface area
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology
Nevus, Pigmented - epidemiology - pathology
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Sunlight
Abstract
The presence of acquired benign nevi is a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma, yet relatively little is known about the etiology of nevi. We have conducted a study of the prevalence of melanocytic nevi among 1146 white Vancouver (Canada) schoolchildren aged 6 to 18 years. Numbers of nevi per square meter of body surface area increase with age in children of both sexes. Male adolescents have more nevi than female adolescents on the head and neck as well as on the trunk, while prevalence in females is higher on the upper and lower limbs. This distribution parallels that of cutaneous melanoma in British Columbia adults. Nevi are more common in children on intermittently exposed body sites than on constantly or minimally sun-exposed sites. This suggests that exposure to strong intermittent sunlight in childhood (a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma) may also be important in the etiology of acquired benign nevi.
PubMed ID
2321992 View in PubMed
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476 records – page 1 of 48.