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Cutaneous malignant melanoma in children and adolescents in Sweden, 1993-2002: the increasing trend is broken.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78361
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jul 15;121(2):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2007
Author
Karlsson Pia M
Fredrikson Mats
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Dermatology, Linköping University, Sweden. pia.m.karlsson@lio.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jul 15;121(2):323-8
Date
Jul-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Skin - pathology - radiation effects
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma rose rapidly in teenagers in Sweden during 1973-1992, while it remained low in younger children. To study the further trends and characteristics of melanoma in this young population, data on all cases in individuals under 20 years of age reported to the Swedish Cancer Registry during 1993-2002, and the corresponding pathology reports were examined. Seventy-nine cases were reported to the Registry. There were 24 males and 55 females. Most melanomas occurred on the trunk followed by the legs in both genders. The median tumor thickness was 0.8 mm. Children under age 15 had thicker melanomas than individuals aged 15-19. Superficial spreading melanoma was the most common histological subtype (43/78, 55%). The melanoma-specific 5-year survival rate was 90%. During 1993-2002, the age-standardized incidence fell to 3.6/million from 5.0/million in 1983-1992 (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.92). The most pronounced decrease was for melanomas on the trunk in boys and on the legs in girls. The incidence for 15-19-year-old boys peaked for the cohort born between 1968 and 1972 and for girls between 1973 and 1977. The decrease in incidence may be a result of public health campaigns aiming at reducing sun exposure in childhood. A contributing effect from an increased immigration of individuals with darker complexions and at a lower melanoma risk is probable.
PubMed ID
17372908 View in PubMed
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Differences in Risk Factors for Melanoma in Young and Middle-aged Higher-risk Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306764
Source
In Vivo. 2020 Mar-Apr; 34(2):703-708
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Johanna S Palve
Niina J Korhonen
Tiina H Luukkaala
Minna T Kääriäinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland johanna.palve@pshp.fi.
Source
In Vivo. 2020 Mar-Apr; 34(2):703-708
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Nevus - etiology - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Skin - pathology - radiation effects
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunburn - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Differences in risk factors for melanoma between young adults (18-39 years) and middle-aged (40-60 years) are not well documented. In this study, we aimed to determine differences in risk factors and characteristics of melanoma between these groups.
This retrospective study is a review on 330 patients, including 250 middle-aged and 80 young adults, during the period 2006-2016 in the Tampere university hospital, in Finland.
Forty-one per cent of middle-aged and 47% of young adults were defined as higher-risk patients. High nevus count was the most common host risk factor in both groups. Young were more likely to have a family history of melanoma. Middle-aged had more often excessive intermittent sun exposure and a history of sunburn. Host risk characteristics were less commonly associated with thicker melanomas.
A high number of patients have host risk factors for melanoma. Several differences exist in risk factors and characteristics of melanomas between young adults and middle-aged patients.
PubMed ID
32111773 View in PubMed
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Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23143
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Jul 30;32(5):1371-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1995
Author
W A Brock
S L Tucker
F B Geara
I. Turesson
J. Wike
J. Nyman
L J Peters
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental Radiotherapy, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston 77030, USA.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 Jul 30;32(5):1371-9
Date
Jul-30-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy
Breast Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Cells, Cultured
Comparative Study
Erythema - epidemiology - physiopathology
Fibroblasts - pathology - radiation effects
Humans
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects - methods
Radiotherapy Dosage
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Skin - pathology - radiation effects
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In the 1970s, a series of breast cancer patients was treated at the Department of Oncology in Gothenburg, Sweden with postoperative irradiation to the parasternal region. Patients were treated bilaterally using different fractionation schedules and doses to the right and left fields. Peak acute reactions were scored on a six-point scale, and skin erythema was measured by reflectance spectrophotometry. Telangiectasia was graded over time on a six-point scale. In April 1992, two small skin biopsies were obtained from 22 patients in two treatment groups (i.e., four dose-fractionation schedules) and, using either delayed or immediate plating, fibroblast radiosensitivity was measured in early passage cultures by clonogenic survival, after high and low dose-rate irradiations. Survival at 2.0 Gy (SF2) was calculated from complete survival curves. RESULTS: To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediate plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques.
PubMed ID
7635777 View in PubMed
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In response to the article "The prevention and management of acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy: a systematic review and practice guideline" (Bolderston et al. 2006).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164556
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Oct;15(10):1219; author reply 1221
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Kelly Nystedt
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Oct;15(10):1219; author reply 1221
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Radiodermatitis - prevention & control - therapy
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Skin - pathology - radiation effects
Notes
Comment On: Support Care Cancer. 2006 Aug;14(8):802-1716758176
PubMed ID
17372772 View in PubMed
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