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[24-hour duty a way to solve the nursing shortage. An open job with a lot of responsibility. Interview by Monika Trozell].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232648
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 Aug 11;12(13-14):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-1988

[A cry from long-term care: understaffing kills us].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242820
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Oct 10;6(18):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1982

Addressing ethical issues in geriatrics and long-term care: ethics education at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196182
Source
Med Law. 2000;19(3):475-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Gordon
L. Turner
E. Bourret
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Law. 2000;19(3):475-91
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case Management
Curriculum
Ethics Committees
Ethics, Medical
Geriatrics - education
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Long-Term Care
Models, Educational
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Patient care team
Program Development
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
An innovative program in ethics education exists at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. This program can serve as a helpful model for long-term care and geriatric care facilities seeking to implement formal training programs in bioethics. Various aspects of the ethics education program are examined. In addition to describing the role of the ethics committee and research ethics board, consideration is given to case consultations, ethics rounds, the training of junior physicians and medical students, grand rounds and the planning of conferences and guest lectures. With regard to educational content in bioethics, health law, professional guidelines and the principlist approach of Beauchamp and Childress are used to explore the ethical dimensions of particular cases. Given the clinical context of the educational initiatives, the pedagogical approach is predominately case-based. While the bioethics literature emphasizes the patient-physician relationship, ethics education at Baycrest recognizes the importance of multiple professions. Physicians, nurses, social workers, speech pathologists, nutritionists and other health care providers are involved in ethical deliberation and education.
PubMed ID
11143884 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143603
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jennifer O'Brien
Margaret Ringland
Susan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Human Resources and Support Services, St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph. jobrien@sjhcg.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Mentors
Nurse Administrators
Nurses
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Research
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Turnover
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention.
PubMed ID
20463447 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of data quality in Canada's Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS): secondary analyses of Ontario data submitted between 1996 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116025
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
John P Hirdes
Jeff W Poss
Hilary Caldarelli
Brant E Fries
John N Morris
Gary F Teare
Kristen Reidel
Norma Jutan
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, N2L 3G1, Waterloo, ON, Canada. hirdes@uwaterloo.ca
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:27
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Databases, Factual
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Humans
Nursing Homes - standards
Ontario
Psychometrics
Selection Bias
Skilled Nursing Facilities - standards
Abstract
Evidence informed decision making in health policy development and clinical practice depends on the availability of valid and reliable data. The introduction of interRAI assessment systems in many countries has provided valuable new information that can be used to support case mix based payment systems, quality monitoring, outcome measurement and care planning. The Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS) managed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information has served as a data repository supporting national implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI 2.0) in Canada for more than 15 years. The present paper aims to evaluate data quality for the CCRS using an approach that may be generalizable to comparable data holdings internationally.
Data from the RAI 2.0 implementation in Complex Continuing Care (CCC) hospitals/units and Long Term Care (LTC) homes in Ontario were analyzed using various statistical techniques that provide evidence for trends in validity, reliability, and population attributes. Time series comparisons included evaluations of scale reliability, patterns of associations between items and scales that provide evidence about convergent validity, and measures of changes in population characteristics over time.
Data quality with respect to reliability, validity, completeness and freedom from logical coding errors was consistently high for the CCRS in both CCC and LTC settings. The addition of logic checks further improved data quality in both settings. The only notable change of concern was a substantial inflation in the percentage of long term care home residents qualifying for the Special Rehabilitation level of the Resource Utilization Groups (RUG-III) case mix system after the adoption of that system as part of the payment system for LTC.
The CCRS provides a robust, high quality data source that may be used to inform policy, clinical practice and service delivery in Ontario. Only one area of concern was noted, and the statistical techniques employed here may be readily used to target organizations with data quality problems in that (or any other) area. There was also evidence that data quality was good in both CCC and LTC settings from the outset of implementation, meaning data may be used from the entire time series. The methods employed here may continue to be used to monitor data quality in this province over time and they provide a benchmark for comparisons with other jurisdictions implementing the RAI 2.0 in similar populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23442258 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new type of long-term care in Hudiksvall. Care activities are more pleasant].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239849
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Nov 29;8(21):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-1984
Author
M. Trozell
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Nov 29;8(21):4-5
Date
Nov-29-1984
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Sweden
PubMed ID
6443050 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new type of long-term care in Hudiksvall, continued. Disagreements on staffing and nurses' role].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239848
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Nov 29;8(21):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-1984

140 records – page 1 of 14.