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252 records – page 1 of 26.

A 10-year study of snowboard injuries in Lapland Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30431
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Apr;14(2):128-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
C. Made
L-G Elmqvist
Author Affiliation
The Tärnaby Health Center, Tärnaby, Sweden. curt.made@vll.se
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Apr;14(2):128-33
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - classification - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Skiing - injuries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Snowboard injuries in a Swedish ski area were evaluated from 1989 to 1999. All injured skiers (alpine, telemark, snowboarders) who sought medical attention at the local Medical Center within 48 h of the accident, were asked to answer an injury form. Physicians assessed and treated the injured skiers. There were a total of 1775 injured skiers; 568 injured snowboarders mean age 19 years. The female/male ratio was 34/66%, the injury rate 3/1000 skier days, three times higher than that of alpine skiers. The skill level of the injured snowboard riders improved during the period. The fall/run ratio of the beginners was higher (1.0) and their risk behavior lower (3.9 on visual analogue scale 1-10) in comparison to the advanced riders (0.4 and 6.6, respectively). Injuries were in 54% located to the upper extremity, 35% were wrist/lower arm injuries. Beginners had significantly higher frequency of lower arm/wrist injuries (46%), than average (32%) and advanced riders (20%). The most frequent single diagnosis was wrist/lower arm fracture (20%). Advanced riders tend to have more head/neck injuries than beginners, 17% vs. 13% (NS). Thus, with elevated skill level the injury pattern changed. For injury prevention, wrist guards and helmets are recommended for snowboard riders.
PubMed ID
15043635 View in PubMed
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Abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers: blood doping or?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71327
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
James Stray-Gundersen
Tapio Videman
Ilkka Penttilä
Inggard Lereim
Author Affiliation
jimsg@singlepoint.net
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Doping in Sports - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices - drug effects
Erythropoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reticulocyte Count
Skiing - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is widespread public concern about fairness in sports. Blood doping undermines fairness and places athletes' health at risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers, which may indicate a high probability of blood doping. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Samples were obtained as part of routine International Ski Federation blood testing procedures from participants at the World Ski Championships. Sixty-eight percent of all skiers and 92% of those finishing in the top 10 places were tested. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Using flow cytometry, we analyzed erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices. Reference values were from the 1989 Nordic Ski World Championships data set and the International Olympic Committee Erythropoietin 2000 project. RESULTS: Of the skiers tested and finishing within the top 50 places in the competitions, 17% had "highly abnormal" hematologic profiles, 19% had "abnormal" values, and 64% were normal. Fifty percent of medal winners and 33% of those finishing from 4th to 10th place had highly abnormal hematologic profiles. In contrast, only 3% of skiers finishing from 41st to 50th place had highly abnormal values. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that blood doping is both prevalent and effective in cross-country ski racing, and current testing programs for blood doping are ineffective. It is unlikely that blood doping is less common in other endurance sports. Ramifications of doping affect not only elite athletes who may feel compelled to risk their health but also the general population, particularly young people.
PubMed ID
12792206 View in PubMed
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[Accidents caused by winter sports. Injuries and occurrence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39288
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Feb 17;148(8):480-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1986

Activity-related knee injuries and pain in athletic adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194268
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001 May;9(3):146-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K A Bergstrøm
K. Brandseth
S. Fretheim
K. Tvilde
A. Ekeland
Author Affiliation
Voss Ski High School, Voss, Norway. kjell.arne.bergstrom@c2i.net
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001 May;9(3):146-50
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arthralgia - epidemiology
Bone Malalignment - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Joint Instability - epidemiology - physiopathology
Knee Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Menisci, Tibial - injuries
Norway - epidemiology
Osteochondritis - epidemiology
Patella - injuries
Skiing - injuries
Tibia - injuries
Torsion Abnormality
Abstract
By collecting data from 45 students at a ski high school, we found that a total of 73% of the students reported activity-related pain/injuries of the knee. Sixty-one percent had overuse injuries, 27% malalignment, and 12% had indistinct knee pain. Females suffered more knee pain/injuries (88%) than males (57%). Significantly higher Q-angle degrees were recorded for females (16) than for males (10). "Jumper's knee" was found in all competitive students with a KT manual maximum difference (MMD) of 3 mm or more (mean 4 mm), with a hard endpoint, whereas this was less common among the other competitive students (P
PubMed ID
11420787 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of visual function and intraocular tension in sportsmen under the conditions of ski march in Prearctic region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85525
Source
Pages 239 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
.ADAPl'ATION OF VISUAL FUKCTION AND INTRAOCULAR •r.ENSION IN SPORTSid&< UNDER TEE CulillITIONS OF SKI LARCH IN PREARCTIC REGION A.F.K o r a b 1 e v (Petrosavodsk, USSR) 34 sportsmen (20 :females and 14 males) aged 18-<5 were observed 23 days period under the conditions of low temperatu
  1 document  
Author
A.F. Korablev
Author Affiliation
Petrosavodsk, USSR
Source
Pages 239 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adaptation
Intraocular tension
Prearctic
Ski march
Sportsmen
Documents
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Aerobic fitness influences the response of maximal oxygen uptake and lactate threshold in acute hypobaric hypoxia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50162
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P. Koistinen
T. Takala
V. Martikkala
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Health Centre Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):78-81
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aerobiosis
Altitude
Anaerobic Threshold - physiology
Anoxia - blood - physiopathology
Exercise Test
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Hockey - physiology
Humans
Lactates - blood
Male
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Respiration - physiology
Skiing - physiology
Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio
Abstract
We studied 12 highly trained athletes, 6 male ice-hockey players and 6 cross-country skiers (2 females, 4 males). All of them participated in a maximal electrically braked bicycle ergometer test in a hypobaric chamber at the simulated altitude of 3000m (520 mmHg) and in normobaric conditions two days apart in random order. The maximal oxygen uptake was 57.4 +/- 7.1 (SD) ml/kg/min in normobaria (VO2maxnorm) and 46.6 +/- 4.9 (SD) ml/kg/min in hypobaric hypoxia (VO2maxhyp). The decrease in maximal oxygen uptake (delta VO2max) at the simulated altitude of 3000m correlated significantly (p
PubMed ID
7751080 View in PubMed
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Aerodynamic drag is not the major determinant of performance during giant slalom skiing at the elite level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119255
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M. Supej
L. Saetran
L. Oggiano
G. Ettema
N. Šarabon
B. Nemec
H-C Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Performance - physiology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Friction
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Skiing - physiology
Snow
Sweden
Time Factors
Wind
Young Adult
Abstract
This investigation was designed to (a) develop an individualized mechanical model for measuring aerodynamic drag (F(d) ) while ski racing through multiple gates, (b) estimate energy dissipation (E(d) ) caused by F(d) and compare this to the total energy loss (E(t) ), and (c) investigate the relative contribution of E(d) /E(t) to performance during giant slalom skiing (GS). Nine elite skiers were monitored in different positions and with different wind velocities in a wind tunnel, as well as during GS and straight downhill skiing employing a Global Navigation Satellite System. On the basis of the wind tunnel measurements, a linear regression model of drag coefficient multiplied by cross-sectional area as a function of shoulder height was established for each skier (r > 0.94, all P
PubMed ID
23121340 View in PubMed
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Alaska Mountain Wilderness Ski Classic: Alterations in Caloric Expenditure and Body Composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295152
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2018 06; 29(2):221-225
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-2018
Author
Michelle M Johannsen
Kenneth J Shin
Karolina Priebe
Robert H Coker
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK (Ms Johannsen, Mr Shin, and Dr Coker). Electronic address: mmjohannsen@alaska.edu.
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2018 06; 29(2):221-225
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adult
Alaska
Body Composition
Body mass index
Bone Density
Cold Temperature
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Male
Skiing
Abstract
The Alaska Mountain Wilderness Ski Classic is a self-supported ultramarathon cross-country skiing event that traverses one of the mountain ranges of Alaska each winter. Unique aspects of this event challenge athletes with a significant amount of physical and mental stress while in the chronically cold conditions of the Arctic. Assessment of energy requirements or body composition has never been performed during this event. The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of the 2016 Alaska Mountain Wilderness Ski Classic on caloric expenditure and body composition.
Caloric expenditure was estimated using GT3x+ Actigraph accelerometers and ActiLife software. Lean tissue mass, total fat mass, visceral fat mass, and bone mineral density were measured using a General Electric iDXA before and after the event. Data are presented as mean±SD. Differences were analyzed using paired t tests with significance at P
PubMed ID
29628417 View in PubMed
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Alcohol as a risk factor for downhill skiing trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11282
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Feb;40(2):284-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
S. Salminen
J. Pohjola
P. Saarelainen
A. Sakki
R. Roine
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Feb;40(2):284-7
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Breath Tests
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skiing - injuries
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of alcohol in downhill skiing injuries. DESIGN: Comparison of alcohol consumption habits and blood alcohol concentrations of injured skiers to those of randomly selected controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 121 injured skiers and 701 control subjects were interviewed and gave breath samples for the determination of blood alcohol concentration. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Neither mean blood alcohol concentration nor the number of subjects with an intoxicating level of alcohol in blood (> 0.5 g/L; 2.9% of control subjects and 3.3% of the injured patients) differed significantly between the groups. Also, the severity of the injury and the blood alcohol concentration seemed to be independent of each other; all of the most severe traumas occurred in subjects with no detectable alcohol in blood. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol does not seem to be a major etiological factor in skiing-related injuries.
PubMed ID
8637080 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1986 Jun 20;106(17-18):1482-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1986

252 records – page 1 of 26.