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An observational study of protective equipment use among in-line skaters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204168
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
L. Warda
S. Harlos
T P Klassen
M E Moffatt
N. Buchan
V L Koop
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. lwarda@escape.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Protective Devices - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sex Distribution
Skating - injuries
Abstract
To describe the patterns of protective equipment use by in-line skaters in Winnipeg, Manitoba and nearby rural communities.
In-line skaters were observed for three months in 1996 at 190 urban and 30 rural sites selected using a formal sampling scheme. Age, gender, protective equipment use, skating companions, correct helmet use, and use of headphones were recorded.
Altogether 123 in-line skaters were observed at 61 sites, including one rural site. No skaters were observed at the remaining sites. There were 37 adults and 86 children; 56% were male. Helmet use was 12.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4% to 18.0%), wrist guard use was 16.3% (95% CI = 9.7% to 22.8%), knee pad use was 9.8% (95% CI = 5.2% to 16.4%), and elbow pad use was 7.3% (95% CI = 3.4% to 13.4%). Children were more likely to wear a helmet than teens 12-19 years of age (relative risk (RR) = 30, 95% CI = 4.01 to 225). Adults were more likely to wear wrist guards than children (RR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.87 to 9.94). No gender differences were found. Incorrect helmet use was documented in four skaters; three skaters were wearing headphones.
Low rates of protective equipment use were documented in our region, significantly lower than those reported in the literature. Barriers to equipment use are not known, and should be examined by further study. In-line skating safety programs should be developed, promoted, and evaluated. Teens should be targeted for future preventive efforts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9788090 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 20;170(43):3411-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2008
Author
Wiborg Majken Højrup
Hamming Marie Bohn
Author Affiliation
Fredensgade 21, DK-6705 Esbjerg Ã?. majkenhw@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 20;170(43):3411-5
Date
Oct-20-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Facility Design and Construction
Humans
Middle Aged
Protective Devices
Questionnaires
Skating - injuries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Before the new temporary ice rink in Esbjerg was built, opponents feared that it would disproportionately increase the number of traumas needing medical care at the hospital. The reason for this concern was that it was built with ramps. MATERIAL AND METHODS: During the winter of 2004 an estimated 30,000 people visited the two ice rinks in Esbjerg. The temporary rink had ramps, whereas the permanent rink had no ramps. A total of 104 persons were injured and needed treatment at the emergency room of orthopaedic surgery. They all received a questionnaire in order to obtain information about a) whether the accident took place on one or the other ice rink, and b) how frequently safety equipment was used. RESULTS: The answers from the questionnaire were used along with information obtained from the emergency room journals. We wanted to establish if accidents on the temporary ice rink were more serious or if the proportion of injuries was higher compared to accidents on the permanent ice rink. DISCUSSION: There was no significant difference in the number of injuries or in the severity of the traumas resulting from skating on the temporary ice rink compared with the permanent rink. Only 4% used safety equipment. CONCLUSION: Having ramps on the ice rink produced no significant increase in the proportion of injuries, nor did it produce more severe traumas. Safety equipment protecting hand and wrist would probably decrease the number of soft tissue injuries presented at hospital.
PubMed ID
18976597 View in PubMed
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Comparison between in-line and rollerskating injury. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32923
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2000 Feb;10(1):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
S. Houshian
H M Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics T, Esbjerg County Hospital, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2000 Feb;10(1):47-50
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Protective Devices
Skating - injuries
Sports Equipment
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Rollerskating is an activity that has become increasingly popular over the past several years among children and adults in Denmark. During a 7-month period in 1997, 300 in-line skaters and 107 roller skaters were treated in the Emergency Department, Esbjerg County Hospital. Of these, 60.4% had minor injuries (sprains, bruises, lacerations) and 39.6% fractures. There was no statistical significant difference in the types of injury between skater groups. The most common serious injury was fracture of the wrist, which occurred in both skater groups (25%, n=102). Almost all of the fractures of the wrist and elbow occurred among skaters who did not wear wrist or elbow guards Only 20% of the skaters used protective equipment. In-line skaters used protective equipment more often than did roller skaters. Of all accidents, 69% occurred on public roads (street and sidewalk).
PubMed ID
10693613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing a culture of safety in a reluctant audience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31565
Source
West J Med. 2002 May;176(3):E1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Richard A Schieber
Sarah J Olson
Author Affiliation
Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US Public Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. rbs4@cdc.gov
Source
West J Med. 2002 May;176(3):E1-2
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Fractures, Bone - etiology - prevention & control
Health promotion
Humans
Protective Clothing
Skating - injuries
Sprains and Strains - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the injury pattern of skateboarding injuries today. METHODS: The pattern of injuries, circumstances, and severity were investigated in a study of 139 people injured in skateboarding accidents during 1995 through 1998 inclusive and admitted to the University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. This is the only hospital in the area, serving a population of 135,000. RESULTS: Of the 139 injured, 3 were pedestrians hit by a skateboard rider; the rest were riders. The age range was 7 to 47 years (mean, 16.0). The severity of the injuries was minor (Abbreviated Injury Scale 1) to moderate (Abbreviated Injury Scale 2); fractures were classified as moderate. The annual number of injuries increased during the study period. Fractures were found in 29% of the casualties, and four children had concussion. The most common fractures were of the ankle and wrist. Older patients had less severe injuries, mainly sprains and soft tissue injuries. Most children were injured while skateboarding on ramps and at arenas; only 12 (9%) were injured while skateboarding on roads. Some 37% of the injuries occurred because of a loss of balance and 26% because of a failed trick attempt. Falls caused by surface irregularities resulted in the highest proportion of the moderate injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Skateboarding should be restricted to supervised skateboard parks, and skateboarders should be required to wear protective gear. These measures would reduce the number of skateboarders injured in motor vehicle collisions, the personal injuries among skateboarders, and the number of pedestrians injured in collisions with skateboarders.
PubMed ID
12016256 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injuries associated with in-line skating from the Canadian hospitals injury reporting and prevention program database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215723
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;86(2):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
J A Ellis
J C Kierulf
T P Klassen
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;86(2):133-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Protective Devices
Skating - injuries
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In-line skating, also known as rollerblading, is an increasingly popular recreational activity that carries with it the potential for injury. As reported in the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database (CHIRPP), 194 children were injured while in-line skating. Fractures to the radius and ulna were the most common type of injury sustained (57.5%), followed by lacerations and abrasions (14.9%). Five children had concussions and very few children reported wearing protective gear such as a helmet or wrist, elbow and knee protectors. Compared to the database overall, in-line skaters suffered more severe injuries and were more likely to require follow-up treatment. Safety implications in relation to protective gear and learning the sport of in-line skating are discussed.
PubMed ID
7757893 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Injuries associated with unpowered scooters. Treatment at the Odense University Hospital 1996-2001]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31266
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Oct 28;164(44):5119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2002
Author
Michael Hareskov Larsen
Henrik Toft Nielsen
Søren Erik Larsen
Jens M Lauritsen
Author Affiliation
UlykkesAnalyseGruppen, afdeling O, Odense Universitetshospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense C. mhl@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Oct 28;164(44):5119-22
Date
Oct-28-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Skating - injuries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Since the beginning of the nineties, skate-boards, in-liners, roller skates, and during the past years non-powered scooters have gained increasing popularity. This surge of enthusiasm has resulted in an increasing number of injuries involving scooters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The subject of our study was to ascertain injuries resulting from scooter usage based on consecutive sampling of patients treated at the casualty department of Odense University Hospital in Denmark between January 1st 1996 and December 31st 2001. RESULTS: 162 patients were registered. 86% of the injuries occurred in the years 2000 and 2001. The major part took place among children under the age of fifteen (93% of all). 94% of the injuries were sustained because the person tumbled when scooting. The injuries were distributed as follows: skull/face 51 (32%), upper extremity 78 (48%), lower extremity 31 (17%), and trunk 2 (1%). 43 persons sustained a fracture of which 32 (74%) were located to the upper extremity. DISCUSSION: Based on the distribution of severe injuries by body regions the results advocates usage of wrist protection at all ages when using a scooter, and parents are advised to restrict usage of scooters to children above the age of eight. Furthermore the study underlines the need for precise registration and code procedures in the emergency room. Otherwise injuries resulting from new products or behaviours cannot be identified.
PubMed ID
12448155 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injuries in children associated with the use of nonmotorized scooters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182865
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2003 Nov;38(11):1612-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Johannes Schalamon
Taisto Sarkola
Yrjänä Nietosvaara
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Graz, Graz, Austria.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2003 Nov;38(11):1612-5
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Austria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Contusions - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Protective Devices - utilization
Skating - injuries
Splenic Rupture - etiology
Abstract
Since 2000, a substantial increase in injuries related to nonmotorized scooters (kickboards) has been observed among children. The authors conducted a population-based prospective study to characterize these injuries in comparison with skateboard-related injuries during the same period.
All children (age
PubMed ID
14614710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injuries in short track speed skating.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184495
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;31(4):507-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andrew Quinn
Victor Lun
John McCall
Tom Overend
Author Affiliation
Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;31(4):507-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Contusions - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Groin - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Lacerations - epidemiology
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Retrospective Studies
Shoulder Dislocation - epidemiology
Skating - injuries - statistics & numerical data
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about the pattern of injury in short track speed skating.
To investigate the incidence and characteristics of injuries in short track speed skating.
Retrospective study.
Ninety-five of 150 elite-level skaters (63.3%) were surveyed to collect information on training and competition load as well as on injuries sustained during the 1999-2000 competitive season. Injuries were characterized in terms of anatomic location, type of injury, time loss from training and competition, and circumstance of injury (acute onset during competition, on-ice practice, off-ice training, or insidious onset).
Sixty-one of the 95 skaters (64.2%) reported sustaining at least one injury. The knee, ankle, spine, leg, and groin were the most commonly reported sites of injury. Skaters were also asked to list previous on-ice injuries. The two most common injuries occurring on-ice before the 1999-2000 season were lacerations from the knee down (11.1%) and ankle fractures (10.2%).
The results of this study suggest that there is a high incidence of injury in competitive short track speed skating.
PubMed ID
12860536 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Inline skating--high fracture risk. Two of three injured are boys and young men. Wrist fractures are most common]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32437
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Nov 1;97(44):4998-5000
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2000
Author
U. Björnstig
J. Björnstig
H. Boman
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för kirurgi och perioperativ vetenskap, Umeå universitet. ulf.bjornstig.us@vll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Nov 1;97(44):4998-5000
Date
Nov-1-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
English Abstract
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Risk factors
Skating - injuries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
In-line skating injuries have increased in recent years. Hospital based data from Umeå concerning 135 persons injured in in line skating collisions were analyzed. The highest yearly incidence of injury was found in males 10-19 years of age, at 1.7 per 1,000 inhabitants; the corresponding figure for females was 0.5. Two-thirds of incidents were caused by falls due to balance problems without the influence of any "external factor" such as rough road surfaces. No collisions with motor vehicles or other road users were registered. Nearly half of the injuries were fractures or dislocation injuries, most frequently of the upper extremities. Non-minor head injuries were rare. Protective gear for wrist and elbow may have the potential to reduce these injuries.
PubMed ID
11107728 View in PubMed
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[Many trendy sports conceal risks. Severe injuries--even in Nordic walking]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70451
Source
MMW Fortschr Med. 2005 Dec 8;147(49-50):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2005

32 records – page 1 of 4.