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An examination between single-parent family background and drunk driving in adulthood: findings from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10272
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Feb;25(2):206-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A. Sauvola
J. Miettunen
M R Järvelin
P. Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Feb;25(2):206-9
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication
Alcoholism - psychology
Automobile Driving
Cohort Studies
Crime
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Single-Parent Family
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested earlier that parental loss could be an important risk factor for alcoholism in adulthood. We explored the association between different types of childhood families with later alcohol-related problems of the offspring, in particular drunk driving. METHODS: We used a large, prospectively collected general population birth cohort database (n = 10,934), the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. Linked with the National crime register, it provided information on drunk driving offenses known to the police that involved persons 15 to 32 years of age (n = 432). Type of family was categorized into five subgroups: two-parent family and four types of single-parent families (single-parent all the time, single-parent at birth, parental death, parental divorce). The information about family type was obtained from questionnaires given to the mothers during mid-pregnancy and at the time of the 14-year follow-up. RESULTS: Single-parent family during childhood significantly increased the risk of drunk driving in adulthood among both males and females. Males who were born in single-mother families were at the highest risk of drunk driving offenses in adulthood (adjusted OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-4.2). The association between single-parent family and drunk driving among males was seen in all types of single-parent families except for parental death. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that growing up in a single-parent family is a potentially powerful predictor of adult alcohol-related problems, i.e., early-onset, late-onset, and recidivistic drunk driving.
PubMed ID
11236834 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depressive symptoms related to parenthood in a large Norwegian community sample: the HUNT2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149184
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Tormod Rimehaug
Jan Wallander
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7489, Trondheim, Norway. Tormod.Rimehaug@ntnu.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Data Collection
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marriage - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Single Person - psychology
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study compared anxiety and depression prevalence between parents and non-parents in a society with family- and parenthood-friendly social politics, controlling for family status and family history, age, gender, education and social class.
All participants aged 30-49 (N = 24,040) in the large, non-sampled Norwegian HUNT2 community health study completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales.
The slightly elevated anxiety and depression among non-parents compared to parents in the complete sample was not confirmed as statistically significant within any subgroups. Married parents and (previously unmarried) cohabiting parents did not differ in portraying low anxiety and depression prevalence. Anxiety was associated with single parenthood, living alone or being divorced, while elevated depression was found only among those living alone.
Burdening selection and cultural/political context are suggested as interpretative perspectives on the contextual and personal influences on the complex relationship between parenthood and mental health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19669679 View in PubMed
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Association of family structure to later criminality: a population-based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122358
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):233-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Olli Ikäheimo
Matti Laukkanen
Helinä Hakko
Pirkko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):233-46
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime - psychology
Criminals - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Single-Parent Family - psychology
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure and DSM-IV based psychiatric diagnoses were based on the K-SADS-PL-interview and criminality on criminal records provided by the Finnish Legal Register Centre. After adjusting for socio-demographic, clinical and family factors, the adolescents from single parent families, child welfare placements and those not living with their biological parents showed an increased risk of committing crimes at an earlier age than adolescents from two parent families. Lack of a safe and stable family environment has important implications for adolescents with severe mental disorder. When these adolescents are discharged from hospital, special attention should be focused on organizing stable and long term psychosocial support which compensates for the lack of stable family environment and seeks to prevent future adversities.
PubMed ID
22825484 View in PubMed
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Associations between family structure and young people's physical activity and screen time behaviors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301315
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; 19(1):433
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-25-2019
Author
Amund Langøy
Otto R F Smith
Bente Wold
Oddrun Samdal
Ellen M Haug
Author Affiliation
NLA University College, Bergen, Pb 74 Sandviken, 5812, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; 19(1):433
Date
Apr-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - psychology
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Screen Time
Sedentary Behavior
Single-Parent Family - statistics & numerical data
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Identifying factors that can influence young peoples' physical activity and sedentary behaviors is important for the development of effective interventions. The family structure in which children grow up may be one such factor. As the prevalence of single parent and reconstituted families have increased substantially over the last decades, the objective of this study was to examine whether these family structures are differentially associated with young people's MVPA, participation in organized sports and screen-time activities (screen-based passive entertainment, gaming, other screen-based activities) as compared to traditional nuclear families.
The data stem from the 2013/2014 "Health Behaviour in School- aged Children (HBSC) study". A large Norwegian sample of 11-16?years old students (n =?4509) participated. Cluster-adjusted regression models were estimated using full information maximum likelihood with robust standard errors (MLR).
After adjusting for covariates, living with a single parent was negatively associated with days/week with 60?min MVPA (b?=?-.39, 95%CI: -.58, -.20), and positively associated with hours/weekday of total screen time (b?=?.50, 95%CI: .08, .93). Young people living with a single parent were also more likely to report no participation in organized sports (OR?=?1.40, 95%CI: 1.09, 1.79). Living in a reconstituted family was negatively associated with days/week with 60?min MVPA (b?=?-.31, 95%CI: -.53, -.08), and positively associated with hours/weekday of total screen time (b?=?.85, 95%CI: .37, 1.33). For all outcomes, the interaction effects of family structure with sex, and with having siblings were not statistically significant. For material affluence, a significant interaction effect was found for participation in organized sports (?2 [4] =13.9, p =?.008). Those living in a reconstituted family with low or high material affluence had an increased risk for not participating in organized sports whereas those with medium material affluence did not.
This study suggests that living with a single parent or in reconstituted families was unfavorably associated with physical activity, sport participation and screen-based behaviors among Norwegian youth. The findings indicate that family structure could be an important factor to take into account in the development and testing of interventions. More in-depth research is needed to identify the mechanisms involved.
PubMed ID
31023280 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards family formation in cohabiting and single childless women in their mid- to late thirties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281959
Source
Hum Fertil (Camb). 2016 Apr;19(1):48-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Kathrine Birch Petersen
Randi Sylvest
Anders Nyboe Andersen
Anja Pinborg
Helene Westring Hvidman
Lone Schmidt
Source
Hum Fertil (Camb). 2016 Apr;19(1):48-55
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Denmark
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Planning Services
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infertility, Female - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Parenting - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Behavior - ethnology
Self Report
Single Person
Single-Parent Family - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study aimed to explore attitudes towards family formation in single or cohabiting childless women of advanced age. The design comprised semi-structured qualitative interviews of 20 women aged 34-39 years attending the Fertility Assessment and Counselling Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. A sample of 10 single women and 10 cohabiting women was chosen with equal distribution of postgraduate education length. Data were analysed using content analysis following the method of Graneheim and Lundman and consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ). The general attitude towards family formation was characterized by a fear of the consequences of choosing motherhood on one hand, and a 'ticking biological clock' and a wish to establish a nuclear family on the other. The women idealized the perception of perfect mothering in terms of uncompromising expectations of child rearing and showed an increasing awareness of solo motherhood as a possible solution to advanced age, the wish of a child and single status compared to earlier studies. Our study contributes to knowledge and understanding of personal considerations related to childbearing in nullipara women in their mid- to late 30s and may be useful in a fertility assessment and counselling setting.
PubMed ID
27006139 View in PubMed
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Availability of the epinephrine autoinjector at school in children with peanut allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156377
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Jun;100(6):570-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Moshe Ben-Shoshan
Rhoda Kagan
Marie-Noël Primeau
Reza Alizadehfar
Nina Verreault
Joyce W Yu
Nathalie Nicolas
Lawrence Joseph
Elizabeth Turnbull
Claire Dufresne
Yvan St Pierre
Ann Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. daliamoshebs@gmail.com
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Jun;100(6):570-5
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Epinephrine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular - instrumentation
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic
Peanut Hypersensitivity - drug therapy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Single-Parent Family
Abstract
Peanut allergy accounts for most severe food-related allergic reactions, and accidental exposures are frequent. Delayed administration of epinephrine and the allergic individual's failure to personally carry epinephrine contribute to fatal outcomes.
To describe epinephrine autoinjector availability at school and to determine factors that might affect autoinjector availability in children allergic to peanut.
Two hundred seventy-one children with peanut allergy living in Quebec were queried about their autoinjector. Logistic regression models were used to select factors associated with device availability.
Four of 271 children diagnosed as having peanut allergy were not prescribed autoinjectors. Forty-eight percent of the children did not carry the autoinjector with them at school. In 78.0% of those, the autoinjector was located in the nurse's or another school office, which was staffed by a full-time nurse only in 18.5%. Of all the respondents, those administered epinephrine for a previous reaction (odds ratio [OR], 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-5.7), older children (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.2), and those living only with their mother (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.0-11.0) were more likely to carry the autoinjector with them at school. Of children 7 years or older, those who experienced a severe reaction were more likely to carry their autoinjector (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-8.1).
Almost 50% of children allergic to peanut might experience a delay in anaphylaxis treatment due to limited access to their device. More education is required regarding the importance of a readily available autoinjector.
PubMed ID
18592821 View in PubMed
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Changes in meal pattern among Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137847
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Nina Øverby
Tonje H Stea
Frøydis N Vik
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. nina.c.overby@uia.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1549-54
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Diet
Eating
Energy intake
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Single-Parent Family
Vegetables
Abstract
The present study aimed to analyse changes in meal pattern among Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008 in general; to analyse associations between meal pattern and gender, parental educational level and number of parents in the household; and to analyse the association between intake of unhealthy snacks, meal pattern and the mentioned variables.
Within the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) project, two cross-sectional studies were conducted, one in 2001 and one in 2008, where participants from the same schools filled in a questionnaire on meals eaten the previous day.
Participants were 6th and 7th grade pupils, n 1488 in 2001 and n 1339 in 2008.
Twenty-seven elementary schools in two Norwegian counties.
There were no significant changes in children's meal pattern from 2001 to 2008. For both years more than 90 % of the participants reported that they had breakfast yesterday, while 95 % had lunch, 94 % had dinner and 82 % had supper. More girls than boys reported that they had lunch yesterday (96 % v. 94 %, P = 0·03). More children with higher v. lower educated parents reported that they had breakfast yesterday (93 % v. 88 %, P
PubMed ID
21241534 View in PubMed
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Childhood family structure and personality disorders in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93493
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;23(3):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Kantojärvi L.
Joukamaa M.
Miettunen J.
Läksy K.
Herva A.
Karvonen J T
Taanila A.
Veijola J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 26, FIN 90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. liisa.kantojarvi@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;23(3):205-11
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Only Child - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The association between childhood family structure and sociodemographic characteristics and personality disorders (PDs) in a general population sample was studied. METHODS: This study is a substudy of the prospective Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Project with 1588 young adult subjects. The case-finding methods according to the DSM-III-R criteria for PDs were: (1) Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) for 321 cases who participated in a 2-phase field study, (2) Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data, and (3) analysis of the patient records in public outpatient care in 1982-1997. Statistical analyses were performed on the association between PDs and family background factors. RESULTS: Altogether 110 (7.0%) of the subjects had at least one probable or definite PD. After adjusting for confounders (gender, parental social class and parental psychiatric disorder) the results indicated that single-parent family type in childhood was associated with cluster B PDs in adulthood. Being an only child in childhood was associated with cluster A PDs. No special childhood risk factors were found for cluster C PDs. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that single-parent family type at birth and being an only child in the 1960s are associated with PD in adulthood. Further studies are needed to explore the psychosocial aspects of family environment which may nowadays promote vulnerability to PDs in adulthood.
PubMed ID
18328677 View in PubMed
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Childhood predictors of male criminality: a prospective population-based follow-up study from age 8 to late adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169462
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 May;45(5):578-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Andre Sourander
Hendrik Elonheimo
Solja Niemela
Ari-Matti Nuutila
Hans Helenius
Louri Sillanmaki
Jorma Piha
Tuula Tamminen
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Irma Moilenen
Frederik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. andre.sourander@utu.fi
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 May;45(5):578-86
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To study childhood predictors for late adolescence criminality.
The follow-up sample included 2,713 Finnish boys born in 1981. Information about the 8-year-old boy' problem behavior was obtained from parents, teachers, and the children themselves. The follow-up information about criminal offenses was based on the national police register between the years 1998 and 2001 when the subjects were 16 to 20 years old.
According to the national police register, 22.2% of boys had at least one criminal offense other than a minor traffic violation during the 4-year study period. Living in nonintact family, low parental education level, parent reports of conduct problems, and teacher reports of hyperkinetic problems when the child was 8 independently predicted a high level (more than five) of offenses. Living in nonintact family at age 8 predicted all types of criminal offenses. Low parental education level and parent or teacher reports of conduct problems independently predicted violence, property, traffic, and drunk driving offenses. Teacher reports of hyperkinetic problems independently predicted all types of criminal offenses except drunk driving. Self-reports of bullying others independently predicted violent offenses.
Living in a broken home, low parental education level, conduct problems, and hyperactivity in middle childhood predict criminal offenses in late adolescence. Efforts to prevent later criminality already in childhood are emphasized.
PubMed ID
16670652 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.