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A 2-dose regimen of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine with the immune stimulant AS04 compared with the standard 3-dose regimen of Engerix-B in healthy young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56626
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
K. Levie
I. Gjorup
P. Skinhøj
M. Stoffel
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Belgium
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization - methods
Immunization Schedule
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
An open-label randomized study was undertaken to compare a 2-dose regimen (Months 0 and 6) of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine formulated with a novel adjuvant (HBsAg/AS04) with a standard 3-dose regimen (Months 0, 1 and 6) of licensed recombinant HBsAg vaccine in terms of immunogenicity and reactogenicity when administered to healthy subjects aged between 15 and 40 y. At 1 and 6 months after the full vaccination course there was a 100% seroprotection rate (anti-HBs > or = 10 mIU/ml) with the HBsAg/AS04 vaccine, compared with a 99% response rate with the licensed vaccine. The corresponding geometric mean titres were significantly higher for the novel vaccine compared to the standard vaccine: 15,468 and 2,745 mIU/ml at Months 7 and 12 vs. 6,274 and 1,883 mIU/ml, respectively. There was a higher prevalence of local symptoms with the adjuvant vaccine (90% of doses) than with the standard vaccine (48% of doses). However, these symptoms (pain, swelling and redness) were predominantly of mild-to-moderate intensity and resolved rapidly without treatment. A 2-dose regimen of the new HBsAg/AS04 adjuvant vaccine therefore compared favourably to the standard regimen in healthy young adults. It is anticipated that the simplified vaccination schedule may improve compliance and reduce costs.
PubMed ID
12238579 View in PubMed
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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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A 9-week randomized trial comparing a chronotherapeutic intervention (wake and light therapy) to exercise in major depressive disorder patients treated with duloxetine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119944
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Klaus Martiny
Else Refsgaard
Vibeke Lund
Marianne Lunde
Lene Sørensen
Britta Thougaard
Lone Lindberg
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Center København, Rigshospitalet, Afsnit 6202, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København ø, Denmark. klaus.martiny@regionh.dk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phototherapy
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Single-Blind Method
Sleep Phase Chronotherapy
Thiophenes - administration & dosage
Abstract
The onset of action of antidepressants often takes 4 to 6 weeks. The antidepressant effect of wake therapy (sleep deprivation) comes within hours but carries a risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new chronotherapeutic intervention combining wake therapy with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization could induce a rapid and sustained augmentation of response and remission in major depressive disorder.
75 adult patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, recruited from psychiatric wards, psychiatric specialist practices, or general medical practices between September 2005 and August 2008, were randomly assigned to a 9-week chronotherapeutic intervention using wake therapy, bright light therapy, and sleep time stabilization (n = 37) or a 9-week intervention using daily exercise (n = 38). Patients were evaluated at a psychiatric research unit. The study period had a 1-week run-in phase in which all patients began treatment with duloxetine. This phase was followed by a 1-week intervention phase in which patients in the wake therapy group did 3 wake therapies in combination with daily morning light therapy and sleep time stabilization and patients in the exercise group began daily exercise. This phase was followed by a 7-week continuation phase with daily light therapy and sleep time stabilization or daily exercise. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure, and the assessors were blinded to patients' treatment allocation.
Both groups responded well to treatment. Patients in the wake therapy group did, however, have immediate and clinically significantly better response and remission compared to the exercise group. Thus, immediately after the intervention phase (week 2), response was obtained in 41.4% of wake therapy patients versus 12.8% of exercise patients (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7-13.4; P = .003), and remission was obtained in 23.9% of wake therapy patients versus 5.4% of exercise patients (OR = 5.5; 95% CI, 1.7-17.8; P = .004). These superior response and remission rates obtained by the wake therapy patients were sustained for the whole study period. At week 9, response was obtained in 71.4% of wake therapy patients versus 47.3% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3; P = .04), and remission was obtained in 45.6% of wake therapy patients and 23.1% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, P = .04). All treatment elements were well tolerated.
Patients treated with wake therapy in combination with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization had an augmented and sustained antidepressant response and remission compared to patients treated with exercise, who also had a clinically relevant antidepressant response.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00149110.
PubMed ID
23059149 View in PubMed
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Access to web-based personalized antenatal health records for pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159321
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Jan;30(1):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Elizabeth Shaw
Michelle Howard
David Chan
Heather Waters
Janusz Kaczorowski
David Price
Joyce Zazulak
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Jan;30(1):38-43
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Internet
Medical Records
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
During pregnancy, the information needs of patients are high and effective information sharing between patients and health care providers is of particular importance. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of providing pregnant women with secure access to their antenatal health records on their uptake of, and satisfaction with, relevant information.
Women presenting to a primary care maternity centre before 28 weeks' gestation were randomized to receive access either to a secure website with links to general pregnancy health information alone (GI group) or to the same website with access to their own antenatal health record (PI group). Primary outcomes included frequency of use, and satisfaction with and perceived usefulness of the web-based information.
We approached 199 women regarding participation in the study; 193 agreed to participate, and 97 were randomized to the PI group and 96 to the GI group. The mean number of log-ins to the website in the PI group subsequently was almost six times the number of log-ins in the GI group (10.4 +/- 17.8 vs. 1.8 +/- 1.4; P
PubMed ID
18198066 View in PubMed
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ACE inhibitors captopril and enalapril induce regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54522
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A I Dyadyk
A E Bagriy
I A Lebed
N F Yarovaya
E V Schukina
G G Taradin
Author Affiliation
Department of Postgraduate Therapy Training, Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diastole - drug effects
Drug Tolerance
Enalapril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Systole - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is frequently noted in patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure not requiring dialysis. Recently, several studies have shown reversal of myocardial hypertrophy in end-stage renal disease with long-term pharmacological control of blood pressure, but it is unclear whether left ventricular mass regresses or normalizes with antihypertensive treatment of patients with earlier stages of chronic renal failure. METHODS: Seventy-two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure, chronic mild-to-moderate hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were randomly assigned in a prospective study to either the captopril (n = 36) or enalapril group (n = 36). Blood pressure measurements, echocardiographic and Doppler parameters were evaluated before treatment and at 6 and 12 months of therapy. RESULTS: During follow-up, six patients developed side-effects including dry cough, taste disturbances, skin rash and gastric intolerance. In the captopril group there was a decrease in mean left ventricular mass index by 12% after 6 months of treatment, which decreased by 20% after 12 months treatment. For enalapril, the average reduction of myocardial mass after 6 months treatment was 14% and after 12 months treatment, the decrease was 19%. In both treatment groups there was significant improvement of left ventricular filling dynamics. No deterioration of left ventricular systolic function was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that antihypertensive monotherapy with the ACE inhibitors, captopril and enalapril, in patients with chronic renal failure results in regression of left ventricular mass index associated with a significant improvement in the diastolic function of the left ventricle without a demonstrable deterioration in left ventricular systolic performance.
PubMed ID
9175047 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture in the prophylaxis of recurrent lower urinary tract infection in adult women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205512
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
A. Aune
T. Alraek
H. LiHua
A. Baerheim
Author Affiliation
Bryggen Medisinske Senter, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):37-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy
Adult
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Recurrence - prevention & control
Single-Blind Method
Urinary Tract Infections - prevention & control
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of acupuncture in the prevention of recurrent lower urinary tract infection (UTI) in adult women.
A controlled clinical trial with three arms: an acupuncture group, a sham-acupuncture group, and an untreated control group. Patients were followed for 6 months.
An acupuncture clinic in Bergen, Norway.
Sixty-seven adult women with a history of recurrent lower UTI.
Acute lower UTIs during the 6-month observation period.
Eighty-five percent were free of lower UTI during the 6-month observation period in the acupuncture group, compared with 58% in the sham group (p
PubMed ID
9612877 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139981
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Nina Kvorning
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kajsa.Landgren@med.lu.se
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Colic - therapy
Crying
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2-8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate room, who handled all infants similarly except that infants allocated to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardised acupuncture for 2 s in LI4.
There was a difference (p=0.034) favouring the acupuncture group in the time which passed from inclusion until the infant no longer met the criteria for colic. The duration of fussing was lower in the acupuncture group the first (74 vs 129 min; p=0.029) and second week (71 vs 102 min; p=0.047) as well as the duration of colicky crying in the second intervention week (9 vs 13 min; p=0.046) was lower in the acupuncture group. The total duration of fussing, crying and colicky crying (TC) was lower in the acupuncture group during the first (193 vs 225 min; p=0.025) and the second intervention week (164 vs 188 min; p=0.016). The relative difference from baseline throughout the intervention weeks showed differences between groups for fussing in the first week (22 vs 6 min; p=0.028), for colicky crying in the second week (92 vs 73 min; p=0.041) and for TC in the second week (44 vs 29 min; p=0.024), demonstrating favour towards the acupuncture group.
Minimal acupuncture shortened the duration and reduced the intensity of crying in infants with colic. Further research using different acupuncture points, needle techniques and intervals between treatments is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20959312 View in PubMed
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Acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis: results of U.S. and European comparative therapy trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223569
Source
Am J Med. 1992 Jun 22;92(6A):70S-73S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-1992
Author
R W Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Ear, Nose, and Throat Center of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Source
Am J Med. 1992 Jun 22;92(6A):70S-73S
Date
Jun-22-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amoxicillin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination
Cephalosporins - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Clavulanic Acids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Doxycycline - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Iceland
Male
Maxillary Sinusitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Middle Aged
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Loracarbef, which is the first agent of the carbacephem class of beta-lactam antibiotics to be developed, provides good activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. A single-blinded, randomized, parallel clinical trial in 10 centers in the United States compared the efficacy and safety of loracarbef with that of amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium in the treatment of acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis. A 7-10-day regimen of loracarbef (400 mg twice daily) was as effective as amoxicillin/clavulanate (500/125 mg three times a day) and resulted in somewhat fewer side effects. The results of a European trial in Sweden, Finland, and Iceland showed that loracarbef was clinically more effective than doxycycline in the treatment of acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis.
PubMed ID
1621749 View in PubMed
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The acute effect of acupuncture on 20-km cycling performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159410
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Satpal Dhillon
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. satpal@ualberta.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Bicycling
Cross-Over Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
To examine acupuncture's effect on cycling performance.
This was a prospective, single-blind, patient as own control (repeated measures), crossover design. Subjects underwent 3 tests a week, riding a stationary bike for 20-km as fast as able. Before each test, they received acupuncture (test A), "sham" acupuncture (test B), and no intervention (control, test C) once each in a random order.
University of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine.
20 male cyclists (age, 18 to 30 years) were recruited via convenience sampling of students and general public. Athletic ability was assessed through a questionnaire and modified Par-Q.
Acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and no intervention in random order with each subject before each test. Acupuncture points were chosen on the basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine and administered immediately before cycling. Sham was shallow needling of known acupoints.
The outcome measures of each of the tests were time to completion, VAS for lower extremity/exercise-induced pain, Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentrations, recorded immediately following each test.
Mean times to Test A, B, and C completion were 36.19 +/- 5.23, 37.03 +/- 5.66, and 37.48 +/- 6.00 minutes, respectively, P = 0.76. Mean RPE scores after tests A, B, and C were 17.65 +/- 0.67, 16.95 +/- 0.99, and 16.85 +/- 0.88, respectively, P = 0.0088. Mean VAS scores after tests A, B, and C were 7.72 +/- 0.86, 7.94 +/- 0.78, and 8.08 +/- 0.69, respectively, P = 0.76.
The only statistically significant finding was that acupuncture gave higher RPE scores compared to the other tests. The clinical significance was that the higher RPE scores gave lower time and VAS scores.
PubMed ID
18185043 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120287
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
N T Gregersen
A. Belza
M G Jensen
C. Ritz
C. Bitz
O. Hels
E. Frandsen
D J Mela
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appetite Regulation
Armoracia - chemistry
Black Pepper - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Ginger - chemistry
Humans
Hyperphagia - prevention & control
Lunch
Male
Mustard Plant - chemistry
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Spices - adverse effects
Thermogenesis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.
PubMed ID
23021155 View in PubMed
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378 records – page 1 of 38.