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Abandonment of newborn infants: a Danish forensic medical survey 1997-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133431
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Alexandra Gheorghe
Jytte Banner
Steen Holger Hansen
Uffe Stolborg
Niels Lynnerup
Author Affiliation
Stor Kongesgade 84, 2tv, 1264 Copenhagen, Denmark. svejme@hotmail.com
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - mortality - pathology
Brain Injuries - mortality - pathology
Burial - statistics & numerical data
Child, Abandoned - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Forensic Pathology
Head Injuries, Closed - mortality - pathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Skull Fractures - mortality - pathology
Time Factors
Umbilical Cord - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Concealment of pregnancy and newborn infant abandonment are closely associated with neonaticide, the killing of an infant within the first 24 h of life or less than 28-30 days depending on the jurisdiction. Abandonment of newborn infants occurs throughout the world and often the outcome for the infant is death. Together with neonaticide it is felt to be one of the least preventable crimes. In this retrospective study we present all forensically known Danish cases of abandoned newborn infant corpses, covering the period from 1997 to 2008. Eleven newborn infant corpses were found; we registered characteristics of the newborn infants and the circumstances of the cases based on autopsy reports. One further newborn infant was included, dating back to 1992, as it was found to be connected with one of the later cases. The mean age of the women who abandoned their newborn infants was 22 years, and five of the autopsied newborn infants were probably alive when abandoned. In two cases the newborn infants were half siblings and abandoned by the same mother. The time span from abandonment to when the newborn infant was found ranged from hours to 7 years. Two-thirds of the newborn infants were girls (66.6%). The most common means of disposal was in a plastic bag (~60%); only one newborn infant was wearing clothes when found. Causes of death were usually given as asphyxia, brain injury or simply undetermined. Two-thirds of the newborn infants showed signs of violence. None of the newborn infants had congenital malformations.
PubMed ID
21706371 View in PubMed
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[A general survey of epidemiologic research in Norwegian psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236907
Source
Ann Med Psychol (Paris). 1986 Jun;144(6):604-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986

Antidepressant utilisation patterns and determinants of short-term and non-psychiatric use in the Finnish general adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158770
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Sep;110(1-2):94-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Sinikka Sihvo
Erkki Isometsä
Olli Kiviruusu
Juha Hämäläinen
Jaana Suvisaari
Jonna Perälä
Sami Pirkola
Samuli Saarni
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
STAKES National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. sinikka.sihvo@stakes.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Sep;110(1-2):94-105
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to study utilisation patterns and determinants of antidepressant use in the general population >30 years, especially short-term use or use not related to known psychiatric morbidity.
Participants from a cross-sectional population-based Finnish Health 2000 Study (2000--2001) were linked with the National Prescription Register and National Care Register for Health Care. Within a representative sample (N=7112) of the adult population (>30 years), 12-month DSM-IV depressive, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders were assessed with the M-CIDI. Utilisation patterns of antidepressants were categorised to short-term, intermittent and continuous use. Factors predicting short-term use or use not related to known psychiatric morbidity were investigated.
Of Finnish adults 7.1% had used antidepressants in 2000, of which two-thirds reported a physician-diagnosed mental disorder; a third (35%) had major depressive or anxiety disorder during the previous 12 months. In terms of utilisation pattern, 43% were long-term users, 32% intermittent users and 26% short-term users. Short-term use was related to care by a general practitioner and having no known mental disorder. A quarter of all users had no known psychiatric morbidity. This type of user was most common among the older age groups, and inversely related to being single, on disability pension and using mental health services.
Not all psychiatric indications for antidepressant use could be explored.
Depression remains the main indication for antidepressant use. About a quarter of users had no known psychiatric indication and the indication remained unclear. Short-term and non-psychiatric use are more commonly prescribed for the elderly.
PubMed ID
18276016 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depressive symptoms related to parenthood in a large Norwegian community sample: the HUNT2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149184
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Tormod Rimehaug
Jan Wallander
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7489, Trondheim, Norway. Tormod.Rimehaug@ntnu.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Data Collection
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marriage - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Single Person - psychology
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study compared anxiety and depression prevalence between parents and non-parents in a society with family- and parenthood-friendly social politics, controlling for family status and family history, age, gender, education and social class.
All participants aged 30-49 (N = 24,040) in the large, non-sampled Norwegian HUNT2 community health study completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales.
The slightly elevated anxiety and depression among non-parents compared to parents in the complete sample was not confirmed as statistically significant within any subgroups. Married parents and (previously unmarried) cohabiting parents did not differ in portraying low anxiety and depression prevalence. Anxiety was associated with single parenthood, living alone or being divorced, while elevated depression was found only among those living alone.
Burdening selection and cultural/political context are suggested as interpretative perspectives on the contextual and personal influences on the complex relationship between parenthood and mental health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19669679 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the sexual norms among the unmarried in Greenland]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4698
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1971 Dec 10;133(49):2443-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1971

Assisted reproduction in a cohort of same-sex male couples and single men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113055
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Stephanie A Grover
Ziva Shmorgun
Sergey I Moskovtsev
Ari Baratz
Clifford L Librach
Author Affiliation
CReATe Fertility Centre, 790 Bay Street, Suite 1100, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G1N8.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):217-21
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Directed Tissue Donation
Family Characteristics
Family Planning Services
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oocyte Donation
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Single Person
Spermatozoa
Surrogate Mothers
Tissue Donors
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
To date, there is limited published data on same-sex male couples and single men using assisted reproduction treatment to build their families. The objective of this retrospective study was to better understand treatment considerations and outcomes for this population when using assisted reproduction treatment. A total of 37 same-sex male couples and eight single men (seven homosexual and one heterosexual) who attended the CReATe Fertility Centre for assisted reproduction services were studied. There was a 21-fold increase in the number of same-sex male couples and single men undergoing assisted reproduction treatment since 2003. The mean age was 46years (24-58). Twenty-eight couples (76%) chose to use spermatozoa from both partners to fertilize their donated oocytes. Most men (32 same-sex male couples and seven single men; 87%) obtained oocytes from an anonymous donor, whereas five couples and one single man (13%) had a known donor. Anonymous donors who were open to be contacted by the child after the age of 18 were selected by 67% of patients. Of all 25 deliveries, eight (32%) were sets of twins. All of the twins were half genetic siblings.
PubMed ID
23768615 View in PubMed
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144 records – page 1 of 15.