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62 records – page 1 of 7.

Atopic Dermatitis: Racial and Ethnic Differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290693
Source
Dermatol Clin. 2017 Jul; 35(3):395-402
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Adeline Mei-Yen Yong
Yong-Kwang Tay
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, National University Health System, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074, Singapore.
Source
Dermatol Clin. 2017 Jul; 35(3):395-402
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Age Factors
China - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - ethnology - genetics - pathology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Malaysia - epidemiology
Phenotype
Prevalence
Singapore - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic inflammatory skin condition affecting up to 20% of children and 3% of adults worldwide. There is wide variation in the prevalence of AD among different countries. Although the frequency of AD is increasing in developing countries, it seems to have stabilized in developed countries, affecting approximately 1 in 5 schoolchildren. Adult-onset AD is not uncommon and is significantly higher, affecting between 11% and 13% of adults in some countries, for example, Singapore, Malaysia, and Sweden. AD is thus associated with significant health care economic burden in all age groups.
PubMed ID
28577807 View in PubMed
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Atypical Fractures are Mainly Subtrochanteric in Singapore and Diaphyseal in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275970
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Nov;30(11):2127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Jörg Schilcher
Tet Sen Howe
Meng Ai Png
Per Aspenberg
Joyce S B Koh
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Nov;30(11):2127-32
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diaphyses - pathology - radiography
Diphosphonates - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Femoral Fractures - drug therapy - epidemiology
Femur - drug effects - radiography
Hip Fractures - drug therapy - epidemiology - radiography
Humans
Probability
Singapore - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We have previously noted a dichotomy in the location of atypical fractures along the femoral shaft in Swedish patients, and a mainly subtrochanteric location of atypical fractures in descriptions of patients from Singapore. These unexpected differences were now investigated by testing the following hypotheses in a cross-sectional study: first, that there is a dichotomy also in Singapore; second, that the relation between subtrochanteric and diaphyseal location is different between the two countries; third, that the location is related to femoral bow. The previously published Swedish sample (n = 151) was re-measured, and a new Singaporean sample (n = 75) was established. Both samples were based on radiographic classification of all femoral fractures in women above 55 years of age. The distance between the fracture line and the lesser trochanter was measured. Femoral bow was classified as present or absent on frontal radiographs. Frequency distribution of the measured distances was analyzed using the Bayesian information criterion to choose the best description of the observed variable distribution in terms of a compilation of normally distributed subgroups. The analysis showed a clear dichotomy of the fracture location: either subtrochanteric or diaphyseal. Subtrochanteric fractures comprised 48% of all fractures in Singapore, and 17% in Sweden (p = 0.0001). In Singapore, femoral bow was associated with more fractures in the diaphyseal subgroup (p = 0.0001). This was not seen in Sweden. A dichotomous location of atypical fractures was confirmed, because it was found also in Singapore. The fractures showed a different localization pattern in the two countries. This difference may be linked to anatomical variations, but might also be related to cultural differences between the two populations that influence physical activity.
PubMed ID
25950861 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the urinary bladder in the Pacific Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246707
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1979 Nov;(53):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
A. Nomura
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1979 Nov;(53):143-8
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Colombia
Epidemiologic Methods
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Japan
Male
New Zealand
Pacific Islands
Singapore
United States
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The incidence of urinary bladder cancer differs markedly among the different ethnic and national groups in the Pacific Basin. Because of these differences, the following colaborative studies can be done to identify and characterize factors associated with bladder cancer: 1) study population groups with different levels of bladder cancer risk who reside in the same geographic setting; 2) study ethnically similar groups who differ in risk and reside in different locations; and 3) study population groups who differ in risks and reside in different geographical regions. Factors possibly related to bladder cancer that have been identified and studied by others include occupational exposure to certain chemicals, cigarette smoking, coffee drinking, artificial sweeteners, certain viruses, radiation exposure, phenacetin, bracken fern, Schistosoma haematobium, tryptophan metabolites, nitrosamines, estrogens, hair dyes, vitamin A, and ascorbic acid. In collaborative studies, the pathologic interpretation of histologic material and the content of the questionnaire should be well standardized, and the laboratory tests should be done at one laboratory. Among the population groups in the Pacific Basin, the Japanese in Hawaii and in Japan provide a unique resource for further investigation with respect to bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
395442 View in PubMed
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Cataract epidemiology performed with Scheimpflug documentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50948
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 1999;31(2):75-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Sasaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Japan. kmu-op@po.sphere.ne.jp
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 1999;31(2):75-85
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - classification - epidemiology - pathology
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Japan - epidemiology
Lens, Crystalline - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Photography - methods
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Singapore - epidemiology
Abstract
Cataract epidemiological surveys applying a photodocumentation system were performed by the author's group in three climatically different sites with racially different populations: Noto (Japan), Reykjavik (Iceland) and Singapore. Data regarding age- and sex-related changes in lens transparency decrease, prevalence and type of opacification are specific for the three populations studied. Direct comparisons of the three different populations revealed that the age-related prevalence of lens opacification, including whole grades, in the Japanese and Icelandic populations was almost the same, whereas that of the Singaporeans was significantly higher. However, the percentage of progressed cases was highest among Singaporeans, followed by the Japanese and Icelanders. Although the application of photodocumentation for cataract epidemiological studies has been limited up to now mainly because of high cost and sophisticated and time-consuming examination methods, more accurate, reliable and objective data can be obtained which will allow prospective decisions on the incidence of cataract.
PubMed ID
9933768 View in PubMed
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Chromosomal changes in prostate cancer: a fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16954
Source
Clin Genet. 2005 Jul;68(1):40-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
K. Das
W. Lau
Cr Sivaswaren
Tan Ph
Smc Fook-Chong
Tien Sl
C. Cheng
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. gurkd@sgh.com.sg
Source
Clin Genet. 2005 Jul;68(1):40-7
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Singapore - ethnology
Sweden
Abstract
The incidence of prostate cancer (PC) is increasing steadily with the aging population in Singapore. As the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in Asian men with PC is poorly understood, we investigated the numerical aberrations for chromosomes 7, 8, 11, and 17 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH was performed on standard sections and tissue microarrays of 54 PC and 33 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) specimens. Among the 54 PC specimens, FISH detected 44 cases as aneusomy and two as disomy and was unsuccessful for eight cases. Cytogenetic alterations of two or more chromosomes per tumor were detected in 33/46 (72%) PCs. The most frequent alteration was aneusomy of chromosome 8 detected in 34/46 (74%) cases followed by numerical aberrations in chromosome 7 (61%). Gain of 8q24, loss of chromosome 7, and gain of 11q13 were associated with higher Gleason score and were statistically significant. Gain of chromosome 7 was more common in locally advanced disease, while gain of chromosome 11q13 and chromosome 7 was more common in metastatic disease.
PubMed ID
15952985 View in PubMed
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Comparison of event and procedure rates following percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients with and without previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery [the ROSETTA (Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Angioplasty) Registry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191825
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Feb 1;89(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2002
Author
Philippe Garzon
Richard Sheppard
Mark J Eisenberg
David Schechter
Jeffrey Lefkovits
Evelyne Goudreau
Koon Hou Mak
David L Brown
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Feb 1;89(3):251-6
Date
Feb-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - utilization
Coronary Artery Bypass
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Incidence
Israel - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Singapore - epidemiology
Stents
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Victoria - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare 6-month post-percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) outcomes and cardiac procedure use among patients with and without prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, we examined 791 patients who were enrolled in the Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Angioplasty (ROSETTA) Registry. The ROSETTA Registry is a prospective, multicenter registry that examines the use of functional testing after successful PTCA. Most patients were men (76%, mean age 61 +/- 11 years) who underwent single-vessel PTCA (85%) with stent implantation (58%). Baseline and procedural characteristics differed between patients with a prior CABG (n = 131) and patients with no prior CABG (n = 660), including Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class III to IV (60% vs 49%, respectively, p = 0.03) and stenosis involving the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (10% vs 22%, p = 0.004). Event rates among patients with prior CABG were higher than among patients with no prior CABG, including unstable angina (19% vs 11%, p = 0.02), myocardial infarction (2% vs 1%, p = 0.2), death (4% vs 2%, p = 0.08), and composite clinical events (22% vs 12%, p = 0.003). Furthermore, patients with prior CABG had higher rates of follow-up cardiac procedures, including angiography (24% vs 14%, p = 0.008) and PTCA (13% vs 7%, p = 0.04), but not repeat CABG (2% vs 3%, p = 0.8). A multivariate analysis that included baseline clinical and procedural characteristics demonstrated that prior CABG was a significant independent predictor of clinical events and cardiac procedure use (odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 3.5, p = 0.0001). Within the prior CABG group, patients with a PTCA of a bypass graft had a higher composite clinical event rate than patients with a PTCA of a native vessel (32% vs 17%, p = 0.05). In contrast, patients with a PTCA of a native vessel had event rates similar to those of patients with no prior CABG (17% vs 12%, p = 0.2). Thus, post-CABG patients have an increased risk of developing a cardiac event or needing a follow-up cardiac procedure during the 6 months after PTCA.
PubMed ID
11809424 View in PubMed
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Critical care lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179943
Source
Curr Opin Crit Care. 2004 Feb;10(1):53-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Stephen E Lapinsky
John T Granton
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, University Health Network, and the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Stephen.lapinsky@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Opin Crit Care. 2004 Feb;10(1):53-8
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
China - epidemiology
Hong Kong - epidemiology
Humans
Infection Control
Intensive Care
Ontario - epidemiology
Prognosis
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - mortality - therapy - transmission
Singapore - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new disease that caused large outbreaks in several countries in the first half of 2003, resulting in infection in more than 8000 people and more than 900 deaths. During that time, a large body of literature rapidly emerged describing the clinical disease, the etiologic viral agent, and management options. This paper reviews the current status of this knowledge base, with particular reference to the critically ill patient.
Case series of patients from Hong Kong, China, Singapore, and Toronto have characterized the disease with remarkable uniformity. A similarly consistent picture of the SARS patient with respiratory failure has emerged from studies from Toronto and Singapore. Worldwide collaboration led to the rapid identification and gene sequencing of the etiologic virus, SARS-CoV.
SARS is a predominantly respiratory illness, spread through droplets from respiratory secretions and possibly via a fecal-oral route. A small number of "super-spreaders" appear to have contributed to the rapid proliferation of the disease. Infection control precautions are an essential component of management. Approximately 20% of patients develop progressive pulmonary infiltrates and respiratory failure, and the mortality rate is as high as 10%. Treatment strategies with antiviral agents such as ribavirin have not clearly demonstrated a benefit, but high-dose corticosteroids appear to be beneficial in patients with progressive disease. The recent outbreaks highlighted the potential for this disease to overwhelm critical care resources, by the volume of patients and loss of healthcare workers to illness and quarantine.
PubMed ID
15166850 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.