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Activation of the immune system and systemic immune-complex deposits in Brown Norway rats with dental amalgam restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72544
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Hultman
U. Lindh
P. Hörsted-Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Antibody Formation - drug effects
Antigen-Antibody Complex - analysis - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Autoimmunity
Body Burden
Comparative Study
Copper - analysis
Dental Amalgam - toxicity
Dinitrobenzenes
Female
Immune Complex Diseases - chemically induced
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Laminin
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Silver - analysis
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Statistics, nonparametric
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Dental amalgam restorations are a significant source of mercury exposure in the human population, but their potential to cause systemic health effects is highly disputed. We examined effects on the immune system by giving genetically mercury-susceptible Brown Norway (BN) rats and mercury-resistant Lewis (LE) rats silver amalgam restorations in 4 molars of the upper jaw, causing a body burden similar to that described in human amalgam-bearers (from 250 to 375 mg amalgam/kg body weight). BN rats with amalgam restorations, compared with control rats given composite resinous restorations, developed a rapid activation of the immune system, with a maximum 12-fold increase of the plasma IgE concentration after 3 wks (p 0.05). After 12 wks, BN rats with amalgam restorations showed significantly increased (p spleen > cerebrum occipital lobe > cerebellum > liver > thymus, and the tissue silver concentration was significantly (p
PubMed ID
9649170 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of 20 years of environmental monitoring data around Swedish nuclear installations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49188
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2002;63(2):117-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Petra Wallberg
Leif Moberg
Author Affiliation
Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm. petra.wallberg@ssi.se
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2002;63(2):117-33
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bivalvia - chemistry
Body Burden
Cobalt Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Europium - analysis
Fishes
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Monitoring - methods - standards
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis
Seawater - analysis
Silver - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Twenty years of environmental monitoring data around the Swedish nuclear power plants and the Studsvik research facilities have been evaluated. In the marine environment, Fucus vesiculosus generally has high activity concentrations and the presence of a large variety of radionuclides in comparison with other bioindicators. However, for single nuclides the detection frequency was higher for 110mAg in Littorina spp and for 152Eu in Macoma baltica in comparison with other bioindicators. Close to the discharge point the activity concentration of 60Co in F. vesiculosus and in the discharge water were correlated. In the terrestrial environment, few radionuclides were detected and the activity concentrations were generally low. Of the terrestrial indicators, mosses had the highest activity concentrations and also comprised the largest variety of radionuclides. The radiation doses to humans based on measurements of released activity were small. Based on the results from the evaluation, alternative sampling strategies for the monitoring program are discussed.
PubMed ID
12363266 View in PubMed
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Occurrence, characterisation and fate of (nano)particulate Ti and Ag in two Norwegian wastewater treatment plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295261
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 15; 141:19-31
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-15-2018
Author
Fabio Polesel
Julia Farkas
Marianne Kjos
Patricia Almeida Carvalho
Xavier Flores-Alsina
Krist V Gernaey
Steffen Foss Hansen
Benedek Gy Plósz
Andy M Booth
Author Affiliation
DTU Environment, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet, Building 115, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. Electronic address: fabp@env.dtu.dk.
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 15; 141:19-31
Date
09-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Metal Nanoparticles - analysis - ultrastructure
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission
Norway
Silver - analysis
Titanium - analysis
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Due to their widespread application in consumer products, elemental titanium (e.g., titanium dioxide, TiO2) and silver (Ag), also in nanoparticulate form, are increasingly released from households and industrial facilities to urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). A seven-day sampling campaign was conducted in two full-scale WWTPs in Trondheim (Norway) employing only primary treatment. We assessed the occurrence and elimination of Ti and Ag, and conducted size-based fractionation using sequential filtration of influent samples to separate particulate, colloidal and dissolved fractions. Eight-hour composite influent samples were collected to assess diurnal variations in total Ti and Ag influx. Measured influent Ti concentrations (up to 290?µg?L-1) were significantly higher than Ag (0.7?µm). Removal efficiencies =70% were observed for both elements, requiring for one WWTP to account for the high Ti content (~2?g?L-1) in the flocculant. Nano- and micron-sized Ti particles were observed with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in influent, effluent and biosolids, while Ag nanoparticles were detected in biosolids only. Diurnal profiles of influent Ti were correlated to flow and pollutant concentration patterns (especially total suspended solids), with peaks during the morning and/or evening and minima at night, indicating household discharges as predominant source. Irregular profiles were exhibited by influent Ag, with periodic concentration spikes suggesting short-term discharges from one or few point sources (e.g., industry). Influent Ti and Ag dynamics were reproduced using a disturbance scenario generator model, and we estimated per capita loads of Ti (42-45?mg cap-1 d-1) and Ag (0.11?mg cap-1 d-1) from households as well as additional Ag load (14-22?g?d-1) from point discharge. This is the first study to experimentally and mathematically describe short-term release dynamics and dry-weather sources of emissions of Ti and Ag in municipal WWTPs and receiving environments.
PubMed ID
29753974 View in PubMed
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