Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Cancer incidence and mortality among Finnish asbestos sprayers and in asbestosis and silicosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208380
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P. Oksa
E. Pukkala
A. Karjalainen
A. Ojajärvi
M S Huuskonen
Author Affiliation
Tampere Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Finland. Panu.Oksa@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):693-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Silicosis - mortality
Vascular Diseases - mortality
Abstract
Cohorts of Finnish asbestos sprayers and of asbestosis and silicosis patients were followed for cancer with the aid of the Finnish Cancer Registry in the period 1967-1994. Compared with the cancer incidence of the total Finnish population, asbestos sprayers had an increased risk for total cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 6.7, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.2-10); lung cancer (SIR 17.95% CI 8.2-31); and mesothelioma (SIR 263, 95% CI 85-614). The SIR of the asbestosis patients was 3.7 (95% CI 2.8-5.0) for all sites, 10 (95% CI 6.9-14) for lung cancer, and 65 (95% CI 13-188) for mesothelioma. The silicosis patients also had significantly high SIR values for all sites (1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1) and lung cancer (2.7, 95% CI 1.5-4.5). The values for the SIR and the standardized mortality ratio for all sites and lung cancer were very similar, and therefore it seems that both are reliable indicators of the occurrence of occupational cancer. It was concluded that pneumoconioses patients and asbestos-exposed workers have a markedly elevated risk for cancer. Asbestos-induced occupational cancers are not only diseases of the elderly, since the relative risk is high also for middle-aged people.
PubMed ID
9131223 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cancer mortality among Finnish workers with silicosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235493
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1987 Mar;(3):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1987
Author
K. Kurppa
Kh Gudbergson
I. Khannunnkarm
Kh Koskinen
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1987 Mar;(3):34-7
Date
Mar-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Silicosis - mortality
PubMed ID
3583026 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Gender differences in death causes and survival rate of silicosis patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118929
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(9):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
O A Morozova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(9):32-6
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Silicosis - mortality
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
The authors analyzed structure of mortality and survival rate in 284 silicosis patients over 14 years. Findings are that the mortality structures among the females and the males with silicosis are different. In both groups compared, the first place among death causes was occupied by cardiovascular diseases. The females with silicosis were more frequent to die with broncho-pulmonary conditions, vs. the males of the same group. However the survival rate among the females over the studied period was higher than that among the males.
PubMed ID
23156062 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ischemic heart disease mortality among miners and other potentially silica-exposed workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164006
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Jun;50(6):403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Jan Weiner
Lotti Barlow
Bengt Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Swedish Work Environment Authority, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Jun;50(6):403-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Mining
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Registries
Risk
Silicon Dioxide
Silicosis - mortality
Sweden
Abstract
Some previous studies have observed an increased mortality regarding ischemic heart disease (IHD) among miners and industrial sand workers. The purpose was to study the occurrence of IHD mortality among silica-exposed workers.
Male miners, well borers, dressing plant workers, and other mine and stone workers were identified in the Swedish National Census of 1970. The total cohort (n = 11,896) was followed from 1970 until December 31, 1995 and linked to the Cause of Death Register. The referent group comprised all gainfully employed men identified in the same census. The Standardized Mortality Ratio was calculated as the ratio between observed and expected numbers of deaths.
An increased risk due to IHD mortality was observed among miners, well borers, dressing plant workers, and other mine and stone workers.
These results indicate a possible relation between silica-dust exposure and IHD. The increased risk of IHD mortality is unlikely explained by smoking habits. Shift work might explain some of the increased risk. A low-grade inflammation in the lungs as a result of dust exposure is discussed as a possible cause. However, the key message is that better dose estimates and better confounding control is needed to study the possible relation between silica-dust exposure and IHD.
PubMed ID
17450544 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality among miners receiving workmen's compensation for silicosis in Ontario: 1940-1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242966
Source
J Occup Med. 1982 Sep;24(9):663-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
M. Finkelstein
R. Kusiak
G. Suranyi
Source
J Occup Med. 1982 Sep;24(9):663-7
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms - mortality
Ontario
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Risk
Silicosis - mortality
Silicotuberculosis - mortality
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
We investigated mortality among 1,190 Ontario miners who received Workmen's Compensation awards for silicosis from 1940 through 1975. In comparison with the general population of Ontario these men had elevated all-cause mortality rates, with deaths attributed to nonmalignant respiratory diseases and tuberculosis being primarily responsible. The group of miners receiving their compensation awards between 1940 and 1959 has experienced more than twice as many lung cancer deaths as expected while men receiving compensation awards after 1959 have had lung cancer rates similar to the general population. It is concluded that silicosis is not a benign disease and that efforts must be continued to prevent its occurrence.
PubMed ID
6215474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality among workers receiving compensation awards for silicosis in Ontario 1940-85.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234842
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
M. Finkelstein
G M Liss
F. Krammer
R A Kusiak
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):588-94
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Ontario
Silicosis - mortality
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
The mortality experience of 1190 miners and 289 surface industry workers receiving workers' compensation awards for silicosis in Ontario since 1940 has been studied up to mid-1985. Both groups were found to have a significantly increased mortality from lung cancer (miners' SMR: 230; surface workers' SMR: 302) and stomach cancer (miners' SMR: 188; surface workers' SMR: 366). Adjustment for smoking and country of origin did not explain the excesses observed. The lung cancer findings are consistent with observations from silicosis registries in Europe. Possible explanatory factors are discussed.
Notes
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1972 Jul;49(1):81-914338782
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1980;6 Suppl 2:1-867384772
Cites: Lancet. 1982 Jul 17;2(8290):1506123852
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1986;9(2):189-2013963000
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1983;4(6):705-236316782
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):399-4056692236
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Dec;27(12):881-44087053
Cites: J Occup Med. 1982 Sep;24(9):663-76215474
PubMed ID
2959310 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Serious silicosis still exits in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274642
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Bengt Järvholm
Magnus Svartengren
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Construction Industry
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quartz - adverse effects
Silicosis - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many measures have been taken in Sweden to eliminate the occurrence of serious silicosis. However, between 1997 and 2013 there were 111 deaths with silicosis as underlying cause, 110 men and 1 woman. In most cases the deceased was rather old; only fourteen persons were below 74 years of age. We have studied the exposure between 2007 and 2012 in the 71 persons who died of silicosis as underlying or contributing cause through medical records. We could find information regarding 48 of them. Ten persons worked in mines, 10 in stone industry, 14 with crushing or blasting of rock, 4 in foundries, 3 were concrete workers and 7 suffered exposure in other industries.  The study shows that the measures taken in Sweden have not been sufficient to totally eliminate serious silicosis.
PubMed ID
26625101 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Sep 6;75(36):3072-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-1978
Author
A. Ahlmark
T. Bruce
R. Maasing
P. Westerholm
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Sep 6;75(36):3072-4
Date
Sep-6-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Silicosis - mortality
Sweden
PubMed ID
682762 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.