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Descriptive study of prognostic factors influencing survival of compensated silicotic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225412
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Nov;144(5):1070-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
C. Infante-Rivard
B. Armstrong
P. Ernst
M. Petitclerc
L G Cloutier
G. Thériault
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health and Pulmonary Research Laboratory, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Nov;144(5):1070-4
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dyspnea - diagnosis
Humans
Lung - radiography
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess survival and the prognostic influencing survival of compensated silicotic patients. All workers compensated for silicosis in the Province of Quebec from 1938 to 1985 (n = 1,165) were included. Clinical data were those collected during the exam that led to a compensation decision. Due to missing data, a subcohort of 961 patients was used for multivariate analysis of clinical prognostic factors with the Cox proportional hazards model. The following factors made an independent contribution to survival: age at compensation, smoking, dyspnea, expectoration, abnormal breath sounds, radiographic appearance, and vital capacity. On the basis of the model, patients with small opacities alone on their chest radiograph and who did not have dyspnea, expectoration, or abnormal breath sounds had a survival similar to the average Quebec man; other patients had a poorer survival. We conclude that it is possible to identify at the time of compensation, silicotic patients who are likely to have a life expectancy similar to that of the general population. Symptoms and physical signs as well as radiographic and lung function abnormalities appear to be useful prognostic indicators in compensated silicotic patients.
PubMed ID
1952433 View in PubMed
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[Prospective analysis of clinical course and outcomes in silicosis patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100522
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(5):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
O A Morozova
N N Deriabina
V P Morozov
L P Senina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(5):19-23
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Siberia
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Silicotuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors revealed features of clinical course and outcomes in patients with silicosis and silicotuberculosis, who worked on iron industry enterprise. The article covers comparative analysis of survival rate and mortality among silicosis patients over 14 years of observation.
PubMed ID
20635542 View in PubMed
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Silica exposure and silicosis among Ontario hardrock miners: I. Methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231557
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D C Muir
H S Shannon
J A Julian
D K Verma
A. Sebestyen
C D Bernholz
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-11
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Mining
Ontario
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the relationship between silicosis in hardrock miners in Ontario and cumulative exposure to silica (crystalline silica--alpha quartz) dust. This first report describes the cohort, the method of classifying the radiographs, and the identification of a case of silicosis.
PubMed ID
2750750 View in PubMed
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Silicosis in women. Experience from the Swedish Pneumoconiosis Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69793
Source
J Occup Med. 1985 May;27(5):347-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985
Author
L. Gerhardsson
A. Ahlmark
Source
J Occup Med. 1985 May;27(5):347-50
Date
May-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Women
Abstract
Among approximately 4,700 cases reported to the Swedish Pneumoconiosis Registry in the period 1931 through 1980 were 53 cases of women with silicosis, 42 of whom had worked in the ceramic industry. In a follow-up investigation, the women who had contracted silicosis in pottery-forming shops were compared with silicotic men whose occupational history was similar. Age, stage of silicosis at the time of diagnosis, and mortality rates, were by and large the same for men and women, as was tuberculosis incidence. The prediagnosis duration of exposure to dust, however, was significantly shorter for the women, (20.5 +/- 8.6 yr) than for the men (28 +/- 10.1 yr) (p less than .001), and roentgenographic evidence of progression of the lesions was more pronounced in the women. No conclusive explanation of this difference was demonstrable.
PubMed ID
4009304 View in PubMed
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Silicosis surveillance in Ontario: detection rates, modifying factors, and screening intervals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218922
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Feb;25(2):257-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Feb;25(2):257-66
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The Province of Ontario has had a surveillance program for workers in dusty industries for almost 70 years. This paper reports the detection rates of silicosis among 68,701 silica-exposed individuals who were first exposed to dust in 1950 or later, and who were still employed in 1979 or later. The detection rate varied strongly with latency, being less than two new cases per 10,000 examinations during the first two decades from first exposure, reaching two new cases per 1,000 examinations at 27 years from first exposure, and averaging between two and four new cases per 1,000 examinations thereafter. The silicosis incidence rate among miners was only about half that among foundry workers. Cigarette smoking was also found to be a risk factor for the diagnosis of silicosis. These data were used to model the detection rate of new cases of silicosis as a function of the time interval between examinations, and results are presented for examination cycles between 2 and 10 years.
PubMed ID
8147398 View in PubMed
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Symptoms and clinical findings in patients with silicosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238973
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Apr;11(2):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985
Author
H. Koskinen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Apr;11(2):101-6
Date
Apr-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography
Abstract
Respiratory symptoms, radiographic findings, and lung function were analyzed in 144 Finnish patients with silicosis. The prevalence of persistent phlegm production in these patients was 46% and that of dyspnea 87%. Impairment of the vital capacity (VC) and the diffusion capacity (DLCO) (less than 80% of predicted values) were found in 46 and 47% of the patients with simple silicosis, respectively. The mean DLCO was lower in patients with advanced simple silicosis (category 3) than in those with slight simple silicosis (categories 1 and 2). In category 3 the DLCO was impaired in 9 out of 12 patients, the impairment being below 65% of the predicted values in six of the nine. All patients with large opacities showed impairment in their lung function tests. Twenty-eight of the silicosis patients had referents matched for exposure to silica dust, age, and gender. The referents had no radiographic signs of silicosis. The patients experienced dyspnea more often than their referents, whereas no difference was found in the prevalence of persistent phlegm production. The mean values of VC, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0), and DLCO were lower in the patients than in the referents. The results indicate a high prevalence of dyspnea, restrictive impairment of lung function, and impaired diffusion capacity in the patients with simple or complicated (ie, large radiographic opacities) silicosis. The DLCO proved to be a rather sensitive lung function parameter for advanced simple silicosis.
PubMed ID
4001897 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.