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More than a photo: Germans from Russia remember their familial relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131539
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):333-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jessica Clark
Author Affiliation
Western Wyoming Community College, Rock Springs.
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):333-49
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Relations - ethnology
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Memory
Midwestern United States - ethnology
Narration - history
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology
Russia - ethnology
Sibling Relations - ethnology
Abstract
Most narrators of the Dakota Memories Oral History Project (DMOHP), the children and grandchildren of ethnic German immigrants from Russia, reminisce a great deal about their family relationships -- grandparent-grandchild relationships, parent-child relationships, and sibling-sibling relationships. They share memories of their grandmothers baking them delicious dough dishes, of their fathers making them labor endlessly in the fields, and of their siblings coaxing them into mischief. Through these relationships, Germans from Russia not only learned about their ethnic group's identity, but they also reshaped it into a new identity, blending their past with their present. Within the context of family relationships, these German Russian descendants forged a new identity rooted in their ethnic heritage and history, but serviceable to new, American-born generations.
PubMed ID
21898966 View in PubMed
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