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60 records – page 1 of 6.

Source
Int J Addict. 1982 Jul;17(5):749-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982
Author
M. Penning
G E Barnes
Source
Int J Addict. 1982 Jul;17(5):749-91
Date
Jul-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Canada
Cannabis
Child Rearing
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Models, Psychological
Peer Group
Religion
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sibling Relations
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
The adolescent marijuana literature is reviewed. Studies show that the prevalence of marijuana use is generally quite low in elementary schools. In junior and senior high samples, findings vary greatly from place to place. The prevalence of use increased dramatically during the 1970s although the use patterns may have peaked already in some areas. The use of marijuana increases with age, but some evidence suggests that a slight drop-off in use occurs near the end of high school. Female use seems to be increasing more than male use. Use seems to be somewhat more prevalent in middle- and upper-middle-class homes and in broken homes. Mixed support has been found for the hypothesis that marijuana users have parents that are more permissive. Parents of marijuana users are generally characterized as being less warm and supportive, and more inclined toward the use of drugs themselves. Peer and sibling use of marijuana seem to be particularly important predictors of adolescent marijuana use. Findings on personality characteristics of marijuana users are not extensive and are somewhat contradictory. There is some evidence that users tend to be somewhat alienated, external in their locus of control, and possibly higher on anxiety. Users are also characterized by a higher value on independence vs achievement and more positive attitudes toward marijuana use. Behavioral correlates of marijuana use include greater use of alcohol and other drugs, and poorer school performance.
PubMed ID
6752049 View in PubMed
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Advancing our understanding of sibling supervision and injury risk for young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107263
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
Stacey L Schell
Bethany Keleher
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. Electronic address: bmorrong@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Canada
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Sibling Relations
Siblings - psychology
Video Recording
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
Sibling supervision has been shown to increase the risk of supervisee's unintentional injury in the home. Both poorer supervision by the older sibling and noncompliance by the younger sibling have been shown to contribute to this risk. Previous studies have shown that informing older siblings that they are responsible for the behavior of their younger sibling improves their supervision. The present study, conducted in Canada, examined whether informing both children the older child is in charge would improve both older sibling supervisory practices and compliance by the younger child. Younger and older siblings were initially placed in a room containing contrived hazards, and their interactions were unobtrusively recorded. In a second contrived hazards room, both children were then informed that the older sibling was in charge, and the supervisor was privately told not to let the supervisee touch hazardous objects. Results revealed that sibling supervisors showed improved supervision but supervisee behavior did not vary across conditions. Implications for injury prevention and future research directions are discussed.
PubMed ID
24034969 View in PubMed
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Are elder siblings helpers or competitors? Antagonistic fitness effects of sibling interactions in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118745
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 7;280(1750):20122313
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2013
Author
Aïda Nitsch
Charlotte Faurie
Virpi Lummaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. a.nitsch@sheffield.ac.uk
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 7;280(1750):20122313
Date
Jan-7-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Competitive Behavior
Female
Finland
Genetic Fitness
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Reproduction
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sibling Relations
Social Behavior
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Determining the fitness consequences of sibling interactions is pivotal for understanding the evolution of family living, but studies investigating them across lifetime are lacking. We used a large demographic dataset on preindustrial humans from Finland to study the effect of elder siblings on key life-history traits. The presence of elder siblings improved the chances of younger siblings surviving to sexual maturity, suggesting that despite a competition for parental resources, they may help rearing their younger siblings. After reaching sexual maturity however, same-sex elder siblings' presence was associated with reduced reproductive success in the focal individual, indicating the existence of competition among same-sex siblings. Overall, lifetime fitness was reduced by same-sex elder siblings' presence and increased by opposite-sex elder siblings' presence. Our study shows opposite effects of sibling interactions depending on the life-history stage, and highlights the need for using long-term fitness measures to understand the selection pressures acting on sibling interactions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23173210 View in PubMed
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The association between unequal parental treatment and the sibling relationship in Finland: The difference between full and half-siblings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268723
Source
Evol Psychol. 2015;13(2):492-510
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mirkka Danielsbacka
Antti O Tanskanen
Source
Evol Psychol. 2015;13(2):492-510
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Paternal Behavior
Sibling Relations
Siblings - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Studies have shown that unequal parental treatment is associated with relationship quality between siblings. However, it is unclear how it affects the relationship between full and half-siblings. Using data from the Generational Transmissions in Finland project (n = 1,537 younger adults), we study whether those who have half-siblings perceive more unequal parental treatment than those who have full siblings only. In addition, we study how unequal parental treatment is associated with sibling relationship between full, maternal, and paternal half-siblings. First, we found that individuals who have maternal and/or paternal half-siblings are more likely to have encountered unequal maternal treatment than individuals who have full siblings only. Second, we found that unequal parental treatment impairs full as well as maternal and paternal half-sibling relations in adulthood. Third, unequal parental treatment mediates the effect of genetic relatedness on sibling relations in the case of maternal half-siblings, but not in the case of paternal half-siblings. After controlling for unequal parental treatment, the quality of maternal half-sibling relationships did not differ from that of full siblings, whereas the quality of paternal half-sibling relationships still did. Fourth, the qualitative comments (n = 206) from the same population reveal that unequal parental treatment presents itself several ways, such as differential financial, emotional, or practical support.
PubMed ID
26101176 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Autism and mental retardation. More attention should be paid to sibling relations when helping families with severely handicapped children in the future]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36809
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Feb 19;89(8):555-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1992

Birth order and fratricidal behaviour in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205055
Source
Psychol Rep. 1998 Jun;82(3 Pt 1):817-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J D Marleau
J F Saucier
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada. marleauj@videotron.ca
Source
Psychol Rep. 1998 Jun;82(3 Pt 1):817-8
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Canada
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sibling Relations
Abstract
In 1996, Sulloway suggested that older siblings would be more fratricidal than younger ones. In Canada from 1974 to 1955, data on fratricide and sororicide do not support this hypothesis.
PubMed ID
9676492 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care work versus career work: sibling conflict over getting priorities right.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132063
Source
Work. 2011;40(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Bonnie Lashewicz
Author Affiliation
Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. bmlashew@ucalgary.ca
Source
Work. 2011;40(1):15-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anecdotes as Topic
Canada
Caregivers - economics
Conflict (Psychology)
Employment
Frail Elderly
Home Care Services
Humans
Sibling Relations
Abstract
As the average age of the Canadian population continues to increase, and providing care at home to frail older adults becomes ever more prevalent, support for family and friend caregivers remains a key social policy issue. Economic support is an important consideration given the impact of caregiving on labour force participation. Yet the caregiving/paid work relationship is not always straightforward. While caregiving often restricts employment, limited attachment to employment may also influence the decision to provide care. Isabel's story, collected as part of a study of sibling views of fairness in sharing parent care as well as parent assets, provides a case study in how siblings give different priority to care work versus career work and what support needs arise including those related to sibling conflict over differing priorities. Isabel claims she sacrificed her career to care for her ailing mother while her siblings argue that through caregiving, Isabel was sheltered from the paid workforce.
PubMed ID
21849744 View in PubMed
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Comparing parent loss with sibling loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202032
Source
Death Stud. 1999 Jan-Feb;23(1):1-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
J W Worden
B. Davies
D. McCown
Author Affiliation
Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
Source
Death Stud. 1999 Jan-Feb;23(1):1-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bereavement
Canada
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Psychological Tests
Sex Factors
Sibling Relations
United States
Abstract
The death of a loved one is a traumatic loss for children, but little attention has been paid to how children's responses vary according to who died--a parent or a sibling. This article reports the findings of a comparison between children's responses to parent and sibling loss. Two samples of bereaved children were combined for the project, which compared children's scores on the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences between the two loss groups in the total number of problems, in any of the syndrome scales, or in the percentage of children at risk. However, when the two loss groups were considered by gender, differences appeared--boys were more impacted by the loss of a parent than by the loss of a sibling and girls were most affected by the loss of a sibling, particularly a sister. Possible explanations for these differences are discussed.
PubMed ID
10346731 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 6.